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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

BBC not keeping me signed in.



 
 
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  #31  
Old June 5th 17, 06:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
phil m
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Posts: 3
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On 05/06/2017 13:59, Java Jive wrote:
On Mon, 05 Jun 2017 10:04:12 +0100, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

On Mon, 05 Jun 2017 10:27:59 +0200, Martin wrote:

My wife has a PhD in physics is trilingual and not senile. She also has
considerable software experience. She is totally disinterested in having a
mobile phone for anything except phone calls and SMS. She wants a phone that
will fit into a pocket and has a reasonable battery life between charges.


Actually, many smart phones with cameras will fit into a pocket and,
because of their relatively small screen size will last a day or more
between charges.


My phone fits easily into a pocket and usually I charge it every two or
three weeks, though it is only switched on for a few hours a week.
Standby is up to a week. A phone that needs charging every day seems to
be rather inadequate in the battery department.

Phil M

  #32  
Old June 5th 17, 06:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tim+[_4_]
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Posts: 182
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phil m wrote:
On 05/06/2017 13:59, Java Jive wrote:
On Mon, 05 Jun 2017 10:04:12 +0100, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

On Mon, 05 Jun 2017 10:27:59 +0200, Martin wrote:

My wife has a PhD in physics is trilingual and not senile. She also has
considerable software experience. She is totally disinterested in having a
mobile phone for anything except phone calls and SMS. She wants a phone that
will fit into a pocket and has a reasonable battery life between charges.


Actually, many smart phones with cameras will fit into a pocket and,
because of their relatively small screen size will last a day or more
between charges.


My phone fits easily into a pocket and usually I charge it every two or
three weeks, though it is only switched on for a few hours a week.
Standby is up to a week. A phone that needs charging every day seems to
be rather inadequate in the battery department.


Depends what it offers you in exchange for that poorer battery life. Most
smartphone users consider the exchange worthwhile.

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls
  #33  
Old June 5th 17, 07:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Java Jive[_2_]
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Posts: 1,654
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On Mon, 5 Jun 2017 19:39:15 +0100, phil m
wrote:

My phone fits easily into a pocket and usually I charge it every two or
three weeks, though it is only switched on for a few hours a week.
Standby is up to a week. A phone that needs charging every day seems to
be rather inadequate in the battery department.


I can't really see why - given that it is a simple matter to put a
phone to charge overnight, all that's really required of one is that
it can last at least, preferably rather more, than a day, including
making the requisite number of calls for its owner's pattern of usage.

To me, if a phone can last between overnight charges, it makes no
difference at all if it last three weeks or three days - two days
will cover nearly all eventualities including forgetting to put it on
charge overnight, and even my S2 with its rather large screen will
still just about do that, despite it being several years old now, with
a battery correspondingly reduced in effectiveness.
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  #34  
Old June 6th 17, 06:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Posts: 260
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

phil m wrote:

My phone fits easily into a pocket and usually I charge it every two or
three weeks, though it is only switched on for a few hours a week.
Standby is up to a week. A phone that needs charging every day seems to
be rather inadequate in the battery department.


If I put my smartphone in airplane mode it will last for over two weeks
on a charge ... it wouldn't be much use as a phone, but then neither is
yours except for the few hours you turn it on ...

  #35  
Old June 12th 17, 03:53 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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Posts: 530
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In article , Max Demian
wrote:
On 03/06/2017 07:49, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Fri, 2 Jun 2017 19:29:42 +0100, Max Demian
wrote:

They may read it, but not understand it, and so not be able to
remember it.

Most people who can read can also write.

It's hard to copy something that might as well be in a foreign
language.


It's not hard to push a button on a smartphone.


Which button? The "translate from incomprehensible technical jargon to
language that people with no interest in the technicalities of how
computer equipment works" button? There isn't one.


I bought a stick-on "Any" button - very useful in the days of WinXP.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #36  
Old June 12th 17, 03:57 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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Posts: 530
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

In article , Chris Green
wrote:
Martin wrote:
And if somebody doesn't have a mobile phone, doesn't have a camera, or
if they have one they don't know how to take a picture with it, or
they don't know how to read and write well enough to make a note of
something on the screen of their computer, if they're not reasonably
au fait with the moden world or the basic language skills they were
taught at school, what on earth are they doing with a computer in the
first place?


My wife has a PhD in physics is trilingual and not senile. She also has
considerable software experience. She is totally disinterested in
having a mobile phone for anything except phone calls and SMS. She
wants a phone that will fit into a pocket and has a reasonable battery
life between charges.


She sounds rather similar to me then, I too just want a mobile phone to
make phone calls and send SMS. For anything else I use a proper
computer... Maybe I am getting senile (70+) but I do have a degree and
am a proper (i.e. chartered, BCS member) software engineer.


For taking pictures I do have a camera though.


I too have a camera and a proper computer ( about 5 of those) and a degree,
but ther are times (away from home) when the phone's camera is useful. The
phon is a lot easier to carry around than a camera, too.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #37  
Old June 12th 17, 08:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Vir Campestris
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Posts: 359
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On 12/06/2017 17:15, Martin wrote:
Unless the phone is very expensive, it can't take the same resolution images as
a camera costing around a third of the price


Depends what you mean, and the conditions.

Some 'phone cameras are amazingly good, and they have plastic aspherical
lenses. They also have _loads_ of pixels.

The down side is that the sensor cells are _tiny_ and so is the lens.
You're up against the diffraction limits. Size really is everything

Especially at long range, or low light.

Andy
  #38  
Old June 12th 17, 09:27 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Green
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Posts: 140
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

charles wrote:
In article , Chris Green
wrote:
Martin wrote:
And if somebody doesn't have a mobile phone, doesn't have a camera, or
if they have one they don't know how to take a picture with it, or
they don't know how to read and write well enough to make a note of
something on the screen of their computer, if they're not reasonably
au fait with the moden world or the basic language skills they were
taught at school, what on earth are they doing with a computer in the
first place?

My wife has a PhD in physics is trilingual and not senile. She also has
considerable software experience. She is totally disinterested in
having a mobile phone for anything except phone calls and SMS. She
wants a phone that will fit into a pocket and has a reasonable battery
life between charges.


She sounds rather similar to me then, I too just want a mobile phone to
make phone calls and send SMS. For anything else I use a proper
computer... Maybe I am getting senile (70+) but I do have a degree and
am a proper (i.e. chartered, BCS member) software engineer.


For taking pictures I do have a camera though.


I too have a camera and a proper computer ( about 5 of those) and a degree,
but ther are times (away from home) when the phone's camera is useful. The
phon is a lot easier to carry around than a camera, too.

I rarely have just one or the other, most of the time I have neither.
If I can carry the phone then I can carry the camera, not much
difference, the camera is thicker but smaller.

--
Chris Green
·
 




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