A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

BBC not keeping me signed in.



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old June 3rd 17, 02:34 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,831
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On 03/06/2017 14:05, Huge wrote:
On 2017-06-03, Max Demian wrote:
On 03/06/2017 07:49, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Fri, 2 Jun 2017 19:29:42 +0100, Max Demian
wrote:

They may read it, but not understand it, and so not be able to remember it.

Most people who can read can also write.

It's hard to copy something that might as well be in a foreign language.

It's not hard to push a button on a smartphone.


Which button? The "translate from incomprehensible technical jargon to
language that people with no interest in the technicalities of how
computer equipment works" button? There isn't one.


Given that you are too stupid to transcribe an error message you do not
understand (which appears to be all of them), or create a screen grab,
perhaps you should go back to your room and let someone else in the care
home use the computer.


I wasn't referring to myself. And few regular users know how to do a
screen grab on Windows or Android. And what do you do with the image
when you get it? Attach it to the post of a text only newsgroup post?

--
Max Demian
  #22  
Old June 4th 17, 09:19 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,150
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On Sat, 3 Jun 2017 13:54:03 +0100, Max Demian
wrote:

They may read it, but not understand it, and so not be able to remember it.

Most people who can read can also write.

It's hard to copy something that might as well be in a foreign language.


It's not hard to push a button on a smartphone.


Which button? The "translate from incomprehensible technical jargon to
language that people with no interest in the technicalities of how
computer equipment works" button? There isn't one.


The shutter button.

If you don't understand something yourself but know somebody who does,
you should at least have sufficient knowledge of the modern world and
sufficient basic intelligence to realise that however clever they are,
they won't be able to diagnose the problem by clairvoyance. If you
can't remember any details to tell them, the camera in your phone can.

Rod.
  #23  
Old June 4th 17, 09:57 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,831
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On 04/06/2017 09:19, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Sat, 3 Jun 2017 13:54:03 +0100, Max Demian
wrote:

They may read it, but not understand it, and so not be able to remember it.

Most people who can read can also write.

It's hard to copy something that might as well be in a foreign language.

It's not hard to push a button on a smartphone.


Which button? The "translate from incomprehensible technical jargon to
language that people with no interest in the technicalities of how
computer equipment works" button? There isn't one.


The shutter button.


It might be the smartphone that has put up the incomprehensible dialog.

--
Max Demian
  #24  
Old June 4th 17, 01:12 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,150
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On Sun, 04 Jun 2017 13:51:01 +0200, Martin wrote:

They may read it, but not understand it, and so not be able to remember it.

Most people who can read can also write.

It's hard to copy something that might as well be in a foreign language.

It's not hard to push a button on a smartphone.

Which button? The "translate from incomprehensible technical jargon to
language that people with no interest in the technicalities of how
computer equipment works" button? There isn't one.


The shutter button.

If you don't understand something yourself but know somebody who does,
you should at least have sufficient knowledge of the modern world and
sufficient basic intelligence to realise that however clever they are,
they won't be able to diagnose the problem by clairvoyance. If you
can't remember any details to tell them, the camera in your phone can.


Assuming everybody has a phone with the camera.


Nowadays that's a fairly safe assumption. Nearly everybody seems to
have them. If the circumstances are different, you deal with them
differently. If all else fails, there's nothing to beat pencil and
paper, and if you can't manage that, a very common ploy used by people
who ring up tech support call centres - more common than you might
realise - is to call tech support and then hand the phone to a child.
A colleague of mine once managed to set up a wireless router and
connect a laptop to it with the assistance, on the phone, of a four
and a half year old. There's always a way. I can understand people who
don't know; what I can't understand is people who won't even try.

Rod.
  #25  
Old June 4th 17, 02:53 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,831
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On 04/06/2017 13:12, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Sun, 04 Jun 2017 13:51:01 +0200, Martin wrote:

They may read it, but not understand it, and so not be able to remember it.

Most people who can read can also write.

It's hard to copy something that might as well be in a foreign language.

It's not hard to push a button on a smartphone.

Which button? The "translate from incomprehensible technical jargon to
language that people with no interest in the technicalities of how
computer equipment works" button? There isn't one.

The shutter button.

If you don't understand something yourself but know somebody who does,
you should at least have sufficient knowledge of the modern world and
sufficient basic intelligence to realise that however clever they are,
they won't be able to diagnose the problem by clairvoyance. If you
can't remember any details to tell them, the camera in your phone can.


Assuming everybody has a phone with the camera.


Nowadays that's a fairly safe assumption. Nearly everybody seems to
have them.


Some phone based cameras can't do close-ups as they don't have auto
focus. Even some of the cheaper 'smart' (i.e. touch) phones.

--
Max Demian
  #26  
Old June 4th 17, 06:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,150
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On Sun, 04 Jun 2017 14:29:23 +0200, Martin wrote:

If you don't understand something yourself but know somebody who does,
you should at least have sufficient knowledge of the modern world and
sufficient basic intelligence to realise that however clever they are,
they won't be able to diagnose the problem by clairvoyance. If you
can't remember any details to tell them, the camera in your phone can.

Assuming everybody has a phone with the camera.


Nowadays that's a fairly safe assumption. Nearly everybody seems to
have them.


I think you will find that many of the older members of the population don't
even have a mobile phone never mind a mobile phone with a camera.


I *am* one of the older members of the population, and I have both. Of
course there are still people without them, but with mobile phone use
becoming so common that we now have to have laws about it, I think
it's reasonable to say that it's more likely that any randomly chosen
person will have one than not.

And if somebody doesn't have a mobile phone, doesn't have a camera, or
if they have one they don't know how to take a picture with it, or
they don't know how to read and write well enough to make a note of
something on the screen of their computer, if they're not reasonably
au fait with the moden world or the basic language skills they were
taught at school, what on earth are they doing with a computer in the
first place?

Rod.
  #27  
Old June 5th 17, 10:04 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,150
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On Mon, 05 Jun 2017 10:27:59 +0200, Martin wrote:


If you don't understand something yourself but know somebody who does,
you should at least have sufficient knowledge of the modern world and
sufficient basic intelligence to realise that however clever they are,
they won't be able to diagnose the problem by clairvoyance. If you
can't remember any details to tell them, the camera in your phone can.

Assuming everybody has a phone with the camera.

Nowadays that's a fairly safe assumption. Nearly everybody seems to
have them.

I think you will find that many of the older members of the population don't
even have a mobile phone never mind a mobile phone with a camera.


I *am* one of the older members of the population, and I have both. Of
course there are still people without them, but with mobile phone use
becoming so common that we now have to have laws about it, I think
it's reasonable to say that it's more likely that any randomly chosen
person will have one than not.

And if somebody doesn't have a mobile phone, doesn't have a camera, or
if they have one they don't know how to take a picture with it, or
they don't know how to read and write well enough to make a note of
something on the screen of their computer, if they're not reasonably
au fait with the moden world or the basic language skills they were
taught at school, what on earth are they doing with a computer in the
first place?


My wife has a PhD in physics is trilingual and not senile. She also has
considerable software experience. She is totally disinterested in having a
mobile phone for anything except phone calls and SMS. She wants a phone that
will fit into a pocket and has a reasonable battery life between charges.


Good for her. I hope she's found one that suits her. Meanwhile, if an
error message should present itself on her computer screen, being
trilingual and with a PhD in physics, she's probably clever enough to
make notes to tell someone else, if she can't fix it herself.

Rod.
  #28  
Old June 5th 17, 10:50 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Green
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 147
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

Martin wrote:
And if somebody doesn't have a mobile phone, doesn't have a camera, or
if they have one they don't know how to take a picture with it, or
they don't know how to read and write well enough to make a note of
something on the screen of their computer, if they're not reasonably
au fait with the moden world or the basic language skills they were
taught at school, what on earth are they doing with a computer in the
first place?


My wife has a PhD in physics is trilingual and not senile. She also has
considerable software experience. She is totally disinterested in having a
mobile phone for anything except phone calls and SMS. She wants a phone that
will fit into a pocket and has a reasonable battery life between charges.


She sounds rather similar to me then, I too just want a mobile phone
to make phone calls and send SMS. For anything else I use a proper
computer... Maybe I am getting senile (70+) but I do have a degree
and am a proper (i.e. chartered, BCS member) software engineer.

For taking pictures I do have a camera though.

--
Chris Green
·
  #29  
Old June 5th 17, 12:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,150
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On Mon, 05 Jun 2017 11:44:33 +0200, Martin wrote:

Meanwhile, if an
error message should present itself on her computer screen, being
trilingual and with a PhD in physics, she's probably clever enough to
make notes to tell someone else, if she can't fix it herself.


Have you tried asking MS for help with interpreting their error messages? :-)


Not all error messages are from MS, and MS are not the only online
source of help with solving them.

I *have* tried googling error messages, or looking for Youtube
tutorials about them, or forum threads where the problem has been
discussed, or anywhere else I think I might find relevant information,
but in every case I've found it essential to have noted *what the
message says*. Whatever the problem, and whoever you hope might be
able to solve it for you, this is the *first* thing to do. It doesn't
matter how you note the details of a problem, but it's pointless
asking anybody for help if you don't. Whether you copy and paste the
text, or screengrab it or photograph it, or recite it to a talking
parrot or carve it on tablets of stone, nobody will be able to help
you with any problem if you can't tell them what it is.

Rod.
  #30  
Old June 5th 17, 01:59 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Java Jive[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,690
Default BBC not keeping me signed in.

On Mon, 05 Jun 2017 10:04:12 +0100, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

On Mon, 05 Jun 2017 10:27:59 +0200, Martin wrote:

My wife has a PhD in physics is trilingual and not senile. She also has
considerable software experience. She is totally disinterested in having a
mobile phone for anything except phone calls and SMS. She wants a phone that
will fit into a pocket and has a reasonable battery life between charges.


Actually, many smart phones with cameras will fit into a pocket and,
because of their relatively small screen size will last a day or more
between charges. The OpenReach engineer who spent all of Friday
afternoon diagnosing and finally fixing my noisy phone line had one
like that, I didn't think to note the make & model but it was about
half the size of my fairly large Galaxy S2. He was using it to view
the reports coming in from somewhere, presumably the local exchange,
of the tests he'd set up on my line.

Of course, it depends what you want from the camera. If you just want
to take a few landscapes, party shots, and selfies, so macro,
telephoto, or zoom is not important to you, then the inbuilt phone
cameras are perfectly adequate, but obviously they're not much good
for wildlife or other advanced styles of photography.

And they can be surprisingly useful. I use mine to photo notices in
local shops about upcoming events, obscure light bulbs within the
house that I wish to replace with low energy replacements, the labels
on things like lawn mowers to ensure I get the right parts, the
Windows authentication codes on laptops so that I'm not having to peer
awkwardly at the base of it to enter the code when reinstalling, etc,
etc. Also, see below ...

Good for her. I hope she's found one that suits her. Meanwhile, if an
error message should present itself on her computer screen, being
trilingual and with a PhD in physics, she's probably clever enough to
make notes to tell someone else, if she can't fix it herself.


If she's given the chance ... One of the most brainless of the many
brainless 'improvements' to Windows over the years was the default
setting of having a PC reboot automatically if it fails to boot the
first time. This auto reboot setting is just about the first thing I
change on any new installation, because it means that if the PC ever
BSODs, then the unfortunate user never gets a chance to read the BSOD
message, and the machine will just endlessly reboot until it's
switched off.

While I was staying at a lodge in between houses, this happened on a
PC owned by the lodge. I video-ed the boot using my phone, then
copied the video to my PC and played it at half speed so that I could
freeze it on the BSOD, and thus was able to report to them that their
disk was corrupted. The owner of the PC was impressed by my
'ingenuity', saying that she 'would never have thought of doing that'.
Whether it was ingenious or not is not for me to say, but I can say
that my thoughts at the time were more centred in anger at the moronic
stupidity of the auto-reboot setting, which required such a convoluted
process just to read an error message!

And I don't think I could have done that with my Canon S40 digital
camera, because the battery would have run out before I'd finished
setting everything up - it uses a bespoke battery which now lasts
only a minute or two, and is too expensive to be worth replacing -
moral: as far as possible only buy equipment that accepts standard
battery sizes.
--
================================================== ======
Please always reply to ng as the email in this post's
header does not exist. Or use a contact address at:
http://www.macfh.co.uk/JavaJive/JavaJive.html
http://www.macfh.co.uk/Macfarlane/Macfarlane.html
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2017 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.