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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

CRTs



 
 
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  #11  
Old May 21st 17, 05:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Posts: 275
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Roderick Stewart wrote:

Andy Burns wrote:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_nkw=crt+-lcd&_sop=3&LH_Complete=1&LH_Sold=1&_osacat=11071&_ sacat=11071


Can anybody really have a use for them? As they're all "Buy it now"
sales, it's impossible to tell if anybody actually does.

All the ones with green prices are actually sales (aren't they?) so I
guess someone must.

  #12  
Old May 21st 17, 05:34 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Terry Casey[_2_]
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Posts: 706
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In article , says...

Is there any market for these any more? Have a couple of old colour tellies
of the analogue type both sort of work, and can be ok on vintage uhf output
computers like Atari and Specttrum, but appart form that...

Brian


I'm quite sure there is - especially if they are old. In fact, the older the
better!

You could offer them on a vintage radio forum such as Golborne:

http://golbornevintageradio.co.uk/forum/index.php

or if you don't want to join just for this purpose, let us have the details
here and I could post them on your behalf.

Are you giving them away or attempting to sell? If the latter, prices would
be useful

A little personal bio to accompany it might be useful.

I think you're in South London somewhere - can you be a bit more specific?

As I doubt you'd find it easy to pack them for a courier, I'm sure that
someone local to you could be found to collect and start them on their way to
wherever in the country they are needed - you'd be surprised at what gets
shipped around and where it goes. It also preferable if it can be arranged
because couriers are notorious for delivering vintage radios and TVs badly
damaged.

You might find the forum interesting, anyway. Most of it is available openly
- no need to join unless you want to post.

There are a couple of other vintage sites which might be useful.

--

Terry

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  #13  
Old May 21st 17, 05:59 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Terry Casey[_2_]
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Posts: 706
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In article ,
says...

At first glance it seems only the Bang & Olufsen tellies are getting
any bids. I wonder if there's something special about the name?

Those Sony monitors will just be for 625 line analogue PAL video, and
mostly with just 14" screens. Can anybody really have a use for them?
As they're all "Buy it now" sales, it's impossible to tell if anybody
actually does. I doubt it though.


If you doubt the interest in vintage TV, take look at this:

http://www.tech-retro.com/Aurora_Des...Converter.html

Broadcast quality 405-line signals on any Band I/III channel for around 200
- most of this model being sold in Britain, of course.

They even output Test-card C if there is no 625-line input.

--

Terry

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  #14  
Old May 21st 17, 06:46 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
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On Sun, 21 May 2017 18:59:00 +0100, Terry Casey
wrote:

In article ,
says...

At first glance it seems only the Bang & Olufsen tellies are getting
any bids. I wonder if there's something special about the name?

Those Sony monitors will just be for 625 line analogue PAL video, and
mostly with just 14" screens. Can anybody really have a use for them?
As they're all "Buy it now" sales, it's impossible to tell if anybody
actually does. I doubt it though.


If you doubt the interest in vintage TV, take look at this:

http://www.tech-retro.com/Aurora_Des...Converter.html

Broadcast quality 405-line signals on any Band I/III channel for around 200
- most of this model being sold in Britain, of course.

They even output Test-card C if there is no 625-line input.



And that's the problem, it's 200.

Plus, all your source material has to be in 625 "format".

Wouldn't it be better to do it with a computer, and a graphics card
capable of outputting 405 directly costing 5-10?
Like I'm doing here?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9b7_x0g0uM&t=91s

Set is a Cossor 918 from 1949/50

A fellow enthusiast, Peter Scott is using the same technique to get
pictures on his 1937 HMV901 mirror-top 240/405 line set, in both
formats.

French 819 should be no problem either.
--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #15  
Old May 21st 17, 10:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 444
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On Sunday, 21 May 2017 10:12:03 UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:
Is there any market for these any more? Have a couple of old colour tellies
of the analogue type both sort of work, and can be ok on vintage uhf output
computers like Atari and Specttrum, but appart form that...


Probably not.

I bought an IIyama 1600X1200 CRT monitor back in 1996/7 for £900. State of hte art at the time, and another for ~£450 in 2004 *giving a 3200x1200 desktop.

In 2014 I traded up to a 4k monitor and intend to add another. The older CRT was given to a friend to use with his laptop and the other kept for demo' purposes.

Brian

--

  #16  
Old May 22nd 17, 12:01 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham C
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Posts: 168
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On Sun, 21 May 2017 10:12:01 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

Is there any market for these any more? Have a couple of old colour tellies
of the analogue type both sort of work, and can be ok on vintage uhf output
computers like Atari and Specttrum, but appart form that...

Brian


When I was a lad (sigh), the local TV repair shop showed me their
'device'.

We went out the back door into the yard and they opened the door to
their defunct outside loo. There was a shelf about 6 feet up on which
were a few wall bricks. They put their dead CRTs carefully on the
floor and closed the door. There was a piece of string dangling
outside and when pulled temporarily collapsed the shelf and the
wallbricks dropped. The rest is history.

It impressed me!

GrahamC

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  #17  
Old May 22nd 17, 12:25 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,060
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"Graham C" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 21 May 2017 10:12:01 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

Is there any market for these any more? Have a couple of old colour
tellies
of the analogue type both sort of work, and can be ok on vintage uhf
output
computers like Atari and Specttrum, but appart form that...

Brian


When I was a lad (sigh), the local TV repair shop showed me their
'device'.

We went out the back door into the yard and they opened the door to
their defunct outside loo. There was a shelf about 6 feet up on which
were a few wall bricks. They put their dead CRTs carefully on the
floor and closed the door. There was a piece of string dangling
outside and when pulled temporarily collapsed the shelf and the
wallbricks dropped. The rest is history.


I'm surprised a few bricks, landing from a height of about 4-5 feet, would
be enough to break the glass. I suppose if one landed on the neck (assuming
the CRT was standing in the normal sideways-on alignment) it might do the
trick.

I presume CRT glass is heat-treated to toughen the glass to make it stronger
and also more likely to break into small pea-sized pieces (like a Triplex
car windscreen).

I remember there was a car dump on the route of the cross-country run from
school and we'd try to lob bricks at the car windscreens to see if we could
shatter them. Most people aimed for the centre of the window, but the best
results were to aim for the edge of the toughened centre section - closest
to the frame while still being in the toughened section - and to use a
corner of a brick to exert maximum pressure. This is the same as the
instructions for using an emergency exit hammer on a train - aim for the
edge and use a pointy hammer.

That cross-country run route is seared into my brain because it could have
been specially chosen to have the greatest number of hazards on it: wet,
muddy lane with loads of puddles; appalling stink from the factory that
boiled up animal carcasses to make glue; fizzing, crackling arcing from
pylons; guard dogs chained outside car dump. The funny thing is that the
route was in the shape of a capital P, and it didn't take people long to
work out that if they waited at the junction of the stalk and curved part of
the P (which was right by the car dump, hence the time to experiment with
smashing car windscreen) they could have a rest and then re-join the mugs
who had gone the long way round, for the last bit of the run back to school.
All went well until one week the teacher *drove* (he didn't run with us -
nothing so energetic as that) in his nice warm Triumph Stag to the war
memorial at the furthest point of the run, and ticked off people's names as
they passed...

That teacher, Bertie, was a damn good maths teacher who fired up my
enthusiasm for the subject, but I've never quite forgiven him for sitting in
his nice warm car with his scarf on and the heater going full blast, while
the lads were stumbling past, frozen to the core, covered from head to foot
in mud splashed up from the lane, and he gleefully encouraged us through the
car window "Only another mile to go, lads - not far now".

  #18  
Old May 22nd 17, 01:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Richmond[_2_]
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Posts: 9
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I am keeping my Widescreen CRT until it dies, because I think CRT is
better than flat screen, or at least better than the non HD ones.
  #19  
Old May 22nd 17, 01:26 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
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Posts: 876
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On 22/05/2017 14:13, Richmond wrote:

I am keeping my Widescreen CRT until it dies, because I think CRT is
better than flat screen,


Be honest now, it's because you can't lift it, isn't it?

But I suppose it keeps you warm on cold nights.

or at least better than the non HD ones.


They're all HD now.


  #20  
Old May 22nd 17, 01:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Richmond[_2_]
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Posts: 9
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Norman Wells writes:

On 22/05/2017 14:13, Richmond wrote:

I am keeping my Widescreen CRT until it dies, because I think CRT is
better than flat screen,


Be honest now, it's because you can't lift it, isn't it?


No. With a system of ropes and pullies I could drag it out of the
house. Or I could move house and leave it behind.


But I suppose it keeps you warm on cold nights.

or at least better than the non HD ones.


They're all HD now.


Which just goes to show what a waste of money the Pre-HD ones were.
 




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