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Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 18th 17, 10:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,908
Default Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3

Aerial riggers I have known
Part Three
Barry

I’ve changed the names and places, but I swear to God everything else
here is true. I thought I’d better say that because the tale of Barry is
really extraordinary.

In 1981 an English local council which I will not name had worries about
the impending Channel Four. Barry had a contract with this council and
advised them that ‘a bit of work’ would need to be done at each site,
when the time came. Channel Four broadcast a test card for a whole year
before programmes started. During that year, at every site that Barry
visited he fitted a double notch filter to remove the Channel Four
signal. He visited a lot of sites in that year, for several reasons. One
was that he had held the contract for ten years and had botched things
up pretty comprehensively in that time, so there were a lot of
call-outs. The other was that he had the habit of setting head-end
amplifiers to run at a level where there was very slight cross
modulation visible. The addition of the Channel Four signal made this
much worse. When Channel Four programming begun and the tenants started
to demand it he charged £220 per system to ‘add equipment to enable
Channel Four reception.’ In fact he simply removed the notch filter. He
‘earned’ about £16,000 that way.

At the same time as this was going on, another English local council
(which again I will not name!) reacted like the first one by spending
money without first seeking proper impartial advice. They assumed that
every property on their books that was connected to a communal system
would need ‘something’ doing to enable C4 reception. They put the work
out to tender on a cost per dwelling basis. The winner was Barry, who
pointed to his excellent track record at the first council and quoted
£16 per dwelling. This particular council had at that time a number of
high rise blocks with about 60 flats in each. So Barry charged about a
thousand quid per block. And to do what? Well, nothing really, because
the blocks had wideband amplifiers and no channel filters. C4 in that
area was well within group so the aerials worked just fine. The council
also had a lot of low rise blocks and the situation was much the same.
There were in total 2,500 dwellings with a communal aerial connection.
Barry pocketed £40,000. He bought a house, a new Land Rover, a boat
trailer, and a small yacht. The money was the equivalent of £150,000 now.

Barry retired, aged forty-five, but after only two years the money was
gone. He used the house as security against a massive bank loan so the
house was eventually repossessed. His wife ran off when the cheques
started to bounce. To be accurate, she drove off in her little red dart.
Barry moved back to the town where his elderly parents lived and went
back to his earliest occupation, which was bricklaying, but soon he
turned again to TV aerials, and before long he’d wormed his way into the
communal systems part of the trade.

Somehow he managed to fool the second of the two councils into taking
him on again. He re-commenced botching their systems up. Some of the
things he did were staggering, both in terms of TV reception and
electrical safety. After a couple of years he lost his driving licence,
was caught at the wheel and had the ban extended. He boasted proudly
that the police in the town where he had the contract had his reg number
on a post-it note on every dashboard. The pal who agreed to drive him
got fed up so for a while he was using the bus to service communal TV
systems. It was beyond ridiculous.

The council built a huge new estate of bungalows and houses. Barry was
awarded the contract to install the communal TV system. At an early
stage he was asked to supply the cable for the underground links, of
which there were many. As it happened he had come across some knock-off
cable dead cheap that he thought would be ideal. The only problem was it
was 92 ohm data coax with a solid dielectric. When the time came to
connect everything up Barry found that the incorrect impedance plus the
solid dielectric meant that the cable simply didn’t work for UHF TV.
Faced with thirty blocks with no reception and tenants being moved in
every day Barry attended at each complainant and fitted a loft aerial.
Unfortunately this was an area where loft aerials didn’t work very well
at all. I suppose this was really the incident that finally caused the
**** to hit the fan, at least as far as the Architects Dept. were
concerned. Housing and Social Services kept him on for a few more months.

Finally he lost the Housing and SS contracts. In the words of one
housing manager, “I heard one of the girls say to a tenant, ‘Well, we’ll
send the aerial man out but I have to warn you he makes things worse as
often as he makes them better.’ It was then I realised that he had to go.”

Barry went to live in a little house near a river. The rent was cheap
because the house was flooded frequently. By this time he was in his
late fifties, but he took up with a girl of sixteen. She was not
particularly bright. Every so often she and her older sister and their
two babies would travel into town on the bus. They would go to the
aerial wholesalers and buy a few aerials, masts, chimney brackets, and
so forth. They had to pay cash of course. And take the items home on the
bus. His lordship would arise at noon and go out to fix a few aerial in
the village.

Barry died in that house, aged sixty. His aorta split.

Bill

PS I forgot to post Part Two didn't I? I'll fish it out and post it later
  #2  
Old May 18th 17, 10:52 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 265
Default Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3

On Thu, 18 May 2017 11:30:08 +0100
Bill Wright wrote:
Barry died in that house, aged sixty. His aorta split.


Good, I hope he died in pain. Pity it didn't happen 10 years earlier. I've got
zero time for people who rip off public bodies that are already short of cash.

--
Spud

  #3  
Old May 18th 17, 04:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,807
Default Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3

I'm certainly not surprised at the councils. They are notorious for acting
without any kind of research into a problem they might never have.
Same problem occurred locally with TV reception from Sky when a tower block
was built in the way. I never did hear what happened in the end.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
Aerial riggers I have known
Part Three
Barry

I've changed the names and places, but I swear to God everything else here
is true. I thought I'd better say that because the tale of Barry is really
extraordinary.

In 1981 an English local council which I will not name had worries about
the impending Channel Four. Barry had a contract with this council and
advised them that 'a bit of work' would need to be done at each site, when
the time came. Channel Four broadcast a test card for a whole year before
programmes started. During that year, at every site that Barry visited he
fitted a double notch filter to remove the Channel Four signal. He visited
a lot of sites in that year, for several reasons. One was that he had held
the contract for ten years and had botched things up pretty
comprehensively in that time, so there were a lot of call-outs. The other
was that he had the habit of setting head-end amplifiers to run at a level
where there was very slight cross modulation visible. The addition of the
Channel Four signal made this much worse. When Channel Four programming
begun and the tenants started to demand it he charged 220 per system to
'add equipment to enable Channel Four reception.' In fact he simply
removed the notch filter. He 'earned' about 16,000 that way.

At the same time as this was going on, another English local council
(which again I will not name!) reacted like the first one by spending
money without first seeking proper impartial advice. They assumed that
every property on their books that was connected to a communal system
would need 'something' doing to enable C4 reception. They put the work out
to tender on a cost per dwelling basis. The winner was Barry, who pointed
to his excellent track record at the first council and quoted 16 per
dwelling. This particular council had at that time a number of high rise
blocks with about 60 flats in each. So Barry charged about a thousand quid
per block. And to do what? Well, nothing really, because the blocks had
wideband amplifiers and no channel filters. C4 in that area was well
within group so the aerials worked just fine. The council also had a lot
of low rise blocks and the situation was much the same. There were in
total 2,500 dwellings with a communal aerial connection. Barry pocketed
40,000. He bought a house, a new Land Rover, a boat trailer, and a small
yacht. The money was the equivalent of 150,000 now.

Barry retired, aged forty-five, but after only two years the money was
gone. He used the house as security against a massive bank loan so the
house was eventually repossessed. His wife ran off when the cheques
started to bounce. To be accurate, she drove off in her little red dart.
Barry moved back to the town where his elderly parents lived and went back
to his earliest occupation, which was bricklaying, but soon he turned
again to TV aerials, and before long he'd wormed his way into the communal
systems part of the trade.

Somehow he managed to fool the second of the two councils into taking him
on again. He re-commenced botching their systems up. Some of the things he
did were staggering, both in terms of TV reception and electrical safety.
After a couple of years he lost his driving licence, was caught at the
wheel and had the ban extended. He boasted proudly that the police in the
town where he had the contract had his reg number on a post-it note on
every dashboard. The pal who agreed to drive him got fed up so for a while
he was using the bus to service communal TV systems. It was beyond
ridiculous.

The council built a huge new estate of bungalows and houses. Barry was
awarded the contract to install the communal TV system. At an early stage
he was asked to supply the cable for the underground links, of which there
were many. As it happened he had come across some knock-off cable dead
cheap that he thought would be ideal. The only problem was it was 92 ohm
data coax with a solid dielectric. When the time came to connect
everything up Barry found that the incorrect impedance plus the solid
dielectric meant that the cable simply didn't work for UHF TV. Faced with
thirty blocks with no reception and tenants being moved in every day Barry
attended at each complainant and fitted a loft aerial. Unfortunately this
was an area where loft aerials didn't work very well at all. I suppose
this was really the incident that finally caused the **** to hit the fan,
at least as far as the Architects Dept. were concerned. Housing and Social
Services kept him on for a few more months.

Finally he lost the Housing and SS contracts. In the words of one housing
manager, "I heard one of the girls say to a tenant, 'Well, we'll send the
aerial man out but I have to warn you he makes things worse as often as he
makes them better.' It was then I realised that he had to go."

Barry went to live in a little house near a river. The rent was cheap
because the house was flooded frequently. By this time he was in his late
fifties, but he took up with a girl of sixteen. She was not particularly
bright. Every so often she and her older sister and their two babies would
travel into town on the bus. They would go to the aerial wholesalers and
buy a few aerials, masts, chimney brackets, and so forth. They had to pay
cash of course. And take the items home on the bus. His lordship would
arise at noon and go out to fix a few aerial in the village.

Barry died in that house, aged sixty. His aorta split.

Bill

PS I forgot to post Part Two didn't I? I'll fish it out and post it later



  #4  
Old May 18th 17, 04:48 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,807
Default Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3

Actually he probably know little about his death, its very fast, usually.
Now they screen you for it. I had mine done last year.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
wrote in message news
On Thu, 18 May 2017 11:30:08 +0100
Bill Wright wrote:
Barry died in that house, aged sixty. His aorta split.


Good, I hope he died in pain. Pity it didn't happen 10 years earlier. I've
got
zero time for people who rip off public bodies that are already short of
cash.

--
Spud



  #5  
Old May 18th 17, 04:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,807
Default Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3

I think most areas have people like Barry though, it may not always be
aerials, sometimes it is heating engineers instead.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
Aerial riggers I have known
Part Three
Barry

I've changed the names and places, but I swear to God everything else here
is true. I thought I'd better say that because the tale of Barry is really
extraordinary.

In 1981 an English local council which I will not name had worries about
the impending Channel Four. Barry had a contract with this council and
advised them that 'a bit of work' would need to be done at each site, when
the time came. Channel Four broadcast a test card for a whole year before
programmes started. During that year, at every site that Barry visited he
fitted a double notch filter to remove the Channel Four signal. He visited
a lot of sites in that year, for several reasons. One was that he had held
the contract for ten years and had botched things up pretty
comprehensively in that time, so there were a lot of call-outs. The other
was that he had the habit of setting head-end amplifiers to run at a level
where there was very slight cross modulation visible. The addition of the
Channel Four signal made this much worse. When Channel Four programming
begun and the tenants started to demand it he charged 220 per system to
'add equipment to enable Channel Four reception.' In fact he simply
removed the notch filter. He 'earned' about 16,000 that way.

At the same time as this was going on, another English local council
(which again I will not name!) reacted like the first one by spending
money without first seeking proper impartial advice. They assumed that
every property on their books that was connected to a communal system
would need 'something' doing to enable C4 reception. They put the work out
to tender on a cost per dwelling basis. The winner was Barry, who pointed
to his excellent track record at the first council and quoted 16 per
dwelling. This particular council had at that time a number of high rise
blocks with about 60 flats in each. So Barry charged about a thousand quid
per block. And to do what? Well, nothing really, because the blocks had
wideband amplifiers and no channel filters. C4 in that area was well
within group so the aerials worked just fine. The council also had a lot
of low rise blocks and the situation was much the same. There were in
total 2,500 dwellings with a communal aerial connection. Barry pocketed
40,000. He bought a house, a new Land Rover, a boat trailer, and a small
yacht. The money was the equivalent of 150,000 now.

Barry retired, aged forty-five, but after only two years the money was
gone. He used the house as security against a massive bank loan so the
house was eventually repossessed. His wife ran off when the cheques
started to bounce. To be accurate, she drove off in her little red dart.
Barry moved back to the town where his elderly parents lived and went back
to his earliest occupation, which was bricklaying, but soon he turned
again to TV aerials, and before long he'd wormed his way into the communal
systems part of the trade.

Somehow he managed to fool the second of the two councils into taking him
on again. He re-commenced botching their systems up. Some of the things he
did were staggering, both in terms of TV reception and electrical safety.
After a couple of years he lost his driving licence, was caught at the
wheel and had the ban extended. He boasted proudly that the police in the
town where he had the contract had his reg number on a post-it note on
every dashboard. The pal who agreed to drive him got fed up so for a while
he was using the bus to service communal TV systems. It was beyond
ridiculous.

The council built a huge new estate of bungalows and houses. Barry was
awarded the contract to install the communal TV system. At an early stage
he was asked to supply the cable for the underground links, of which there
were many. As it happened he had come across some knock-off cable dead
cheap that he thought would be ideal. The only problem was it was 92 ohm
data coax with a solid dielectric. When the time came to connect
everything up Barry found that the incorrect impedance plus the solid
dielectric meant that the cable simply didn't work for UHF TV. Faced with
thirty blocks with no reception and tenants being moved in every day Barry
attended at each complainant and fitted a loft aerial. Unfortunately this
was an area where loft aerials didn't work very well at all. I suppose
this was really the incident that finally caused the **** to hit the fan,
at least as far as the Architects Dept. were concerned. Housing and Social
Services kept him on for a few more months.

Finally he lost the Housing and SS contracts. In the words of one housing
manager, "I heard one of the girls say to a tenant, 'Well, we'll send the
aerial man out but I have to warn you he makes things worse as often as he
makes them better.' It was then I realised that he had to go."

Barry went to live in a little house near a river. The rent was cheap
because the house was flooded frequently. By this time he was in his late
fifties, but he took up with a girl of sixteen. She was not particularly
bright. Every so often she and her older sister and their two babies would
travel into town on the bus. They would go to the aerial wholesalers and
buy a few aerials, masts, chimney brackets, and so forth. They had to pay
cash of course. And take the items home on the bus. His lordship would
arise at noon and go out to fix a few aerial in the village.

Barry died in that house, aged sixty. His aorta split.

Bill

PS I forgot to post Part Two didn't I? I'll fish it out and post it later



  #6  
Old May 18th 17, 05:14 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mike Tomlinson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 343
Default Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3

En el artculo , brightside
S9 escribi:

After
much head scratching trying to understand the problems, and asking
said terminals manufacturing field support to investigate why so many
terminals were faulty, it was found that the coax used was 50 ohm,
not 92 ohm.


Thin Ethernet is 50 ohm, perhaps the installing firm thought the network
was ethernet rather than 3270/5250 terminals?

--
(\_/)
(='.'=) "Between two evils, I always pick
(")_(") the one I never tried before." - Mae West
  #7  
Old May 24th 17, 04:06 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 607
Default Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3

In article ,
brightside S9 wrote:
On Thu, 18 May 2017 11:30:08 +0100, Bill Wright
wrote:
[snip]
The council built a huge new estate of bungalows and houses. Barry was
awarded the contract to install the communal TV system. At an early
stage he was asked to supply the cable for the underground links, of
which there were many. As it happened he had come across some knock-off
cable dead cheap that he thought would be ideal. The only problem was it
was 92 ohm data coax with a solid dielectric. When the time came to
connect everything up Barry found that the incorrect impedance plus the
solid dielectric meant that the cable simply didnt work for UHF TV.

[snip]


A well known oil company managed to achieve the opposite. There were
to be many new data terminals to be installed in a refinery site's new
offices. The coaxes and power were laid by contracting
'electricians'. The power was OK and some terminals worked OK. After
much head scratching trying to understand the problems, and asking
said terminals manufacturing field support to investigate why so many
terminals were faulty, it was found that the coax used was 50 ohm,
not 92 ohm. Much time was wasted demonstrating to the contractors and
the oil companies management that the specified 92ohm worked perfectly
and the 50 ohm didn't work over long runs. The oil company got a
different contractor to install the correct coax.


I prefer the aerial installtion at the BBC's pavilion at the Royal Welsh
Showground. This was installed by the electrician who was a cousin of
someone.

The aerial fed a two outlet amplifier, then two outlets of which fed a loop
(as in ring main) feeding all the various outlets round the building.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #8  
Old May 24th 17, 04:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 607
Default Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3

In article , Brian Gaff
wrote:
I'm certainly not surprised at the councils. They are notorious for
acting without any kind of research into a problem they might never have.


indeed so. Some years ago our local council issued a safety edict for all
village halls. I wrote and told them it was nonsensical. I can't have
been the only person, since the edict was withdrawn and a real one issued
many months later. They must have found someone who understod the then
current IEE Regs.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
  #9  
Old May 25th 17, 03:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,908
Default Aerial riggers I have known, Part 3

On 24/05/2017 17:06, charles wrote:

I prefer the aerial installtion at the BBC's pavilion at the Royal Welsh
Showground. This was installed by the electrician who was a cousin of
someone.

The aerial fed a two outlet amplifier, then two outlets of which fed a loop
(as in ring main) feeding all the various outlets round the building.


I was called to a new OAP home conversion where I was shown two lengths
of ye olde coax in the loft and told (proudly) by the electricians that
all I had to do was fit an aerial in the loft and 'connect it to both
ends.' This, I was assured, would work fine for all the sockets on the
loop -- all 40 of them.

After about a year of OAP unhappiness I was finally asked to fit a new
system, externally, with cables running across the walls, which were
rendered. It looked terrible.

Bill
 




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