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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.



 
 
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  #61  
Old May 14th 17, 02:37 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tweed[_3_]
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Posts: 9
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

I don't think the objection here is to do with paying the licence,
just with giving the BBC too much personal info.

and what do you think that the BBC are going to do with it?

other than check that you are licensed to receive the service (and probably
not even that)


It's not what the BBC would do with it that should concern us. You're
right that they'd probably use it for nothing more than administering
the service, which as I understand it is all that they're allowed to
do anyway.

However, it would require putting the personal details of millions of
people into the hands of yet another large organisation, and we've
seen time and time again how unsafe that is. It would be justified if
it was necessary for the provision of the service, but it isn't. Some
organisations, the NHS to pick an example at random, have to provide
services that are tailored to the individual, and for that they
absolutely need personal data, but the BBC doesn't. The BBC is a
broadcaster, and has been providing broadcasting services quite
competently without our personal details for more than three quarters
of a century, so there is no valid argument that it needs them now.

I've no issue with authorised agencies using my data for authorised
legal purposes, but there's never any guarantee that those would be
the only people who would get hold of it. Giving it away more often
than necessary just increases the risk that it will fall into the
wrong hands, and if it isn't necessary I don't want to do it.


Here's what the BBC say!
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technolog...word-controls/


Well part of the problem is that the information asked for has nothing to
do with the TV licence. *I* don't have a TV licence but I legally watch the
TV and use iPlayer. The thing is, my wife holds the licence. It is
households (properties, hotels, campsites etc) that are licensed, not
individuals. Members of one household don't even have to share the same
surname, so how any of this is of use for any form of enforcement is beyond
me. What I do think it is for is to get us used to the concept of logging
in, because one day in the future it will be a subscription based service.
(or some parts at least)

  #62  
Old May 14th 17, 03:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,139
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

In article , Martin
wrote:
On Sat, 13 May 2017 12:12:55 +0100, Robin wrote:


On 13/05/2017 11:50, Roderick Stewart wrote:
If they can do it, I don't see why the BBC couldn't.



One reason is that the contracts the BBC entered into with
producers/performers did not give them the right to do so, and the BBC
could be sued if they just ignored the inconvenient fact that people
have intellectual property rights.


As far as I know the BBC has had intellectual property rights to
everything they have produced for at least 15 years. It is written into
contracts.


However some items were made more than 15 years ago, and other have been
made by someone else. Feature films are the obvious example. But the use of
'production companies' more recently might mean that the BBC's rights are
limited to suit production company and save the BBC money.

The problem is that IPR is not a monolithic single total owenrship. Its a
set of associated arrangements that may vary from case to case.

I presume the way some feature films aren't available 'on demand' is down
to such factors. i.e. the BBC was allowed to pay to show them live on TV
but were either refused the rights or asked too much money to also have
them 'on demand'. But it may be that production companies do something
similar and offer a lower price for limited permissions being given to the
BBC.

Jim

--
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  #63  
Old May 15th 17, 12:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 380
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

On Sun, 14 May 2017 06:49:07 +0100, Woody wrote:

"Johnny B Good" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 13 May 2017 20:00:41 +0100, Roderick Stewart wrote:

[snip]
As is made obvious by the uptime (since I last did a soft reset) and
the lease time measured in days, hours, minutes and seconds, the IP
lease on the WAN connection endures for several days (possibly as many
as 7 days but it's hard to figure out from the uptime and lease
remaining figures but unlikely to be less than 2 1/2 days). I'm pretty
sure the same IP is issued on renewal of the lease but won't be able to
verify that until around noon next Tuesday (I've copied the details to
a text document so I can check for such a change when the current lease
is renewed).

Although you usually have to pay a little extra for a fixed IP address,
the 'Dynamic IP Address Allocation' for most broadband customers is
virtually a fixed IP address in practice (but it's not guaranteed,
hence the use of DDNS services by cheap users in support of a self
hosted web server or service).



I have had the same WAN IP address from VM for at least a couple of
years.


I suspect that's likely true for most of VM's cable connected customers,
myself included. Unfortunately, it never occurred to me, all those many
years ago, to take note of the WAN IP address so I could check.

Incidentally, you can usually discover your WAN IP without querying your
router's status pages simply by going to the "ShieldsUP!" page at https://
www.grc.com If you've never availed yourself of "ShieldsUP!" before, I
highly recommend a visit to verify the efficacy of your router's firewall.

I've just run the portscan test (1st 1055 ports which all showed
'green') and the UPnP exposure test (also 'green') just the same result
as the last time I checked a year or three back.

The IP address matches what the SuperHub2 reported some 24 hours earlier
via its own status pages, validating my advice regarding the use of
"ShieldsUP!" to report the IP address of your WAN connection when you
can't find any way to persuade your router to reveal this information.

--
Johnny B Good
  #64  
Old May 15th 17, 12:57 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Posts: 245
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

Johnny B Good wrote:

Woody wrote:

I have had the same WAN IP address from VM for at least a couple of
years.


I suspect that's likely true for most of VM's cable connected customers,


Do they *have* any other type of customers? I thought they ditched all
their ADSL customers to another ISP a year or two back?


  #65  
Old May 15th 17, 09:51 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Robin[_8_]
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Posts: 385
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

On 15/05/2017 01:57, Andy Burns wrote:

I suspect that's likely true for most of VM's cable connected
customers,


Do they *have* any other type of customers? I thought they ditched all
their ADSL customers to another ISP a year or two back?


But they do have some FTTP customers


--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
  #66  
Old May 15th 17, 10:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Posts: 245
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

Robin wrote:

[Virgin]

they do have some FTTP customers

Such as my neighbour, they still use DOCSIS via (RFoG) so at a stretch
you could think of them as 'cable' customers:-)
  #67  
Old May 15th 17, 10:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Robin[_8_]
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Posts: 385
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

On 14/05/2017 16:16, Jim Lesurf wrote:
In article , Martin
wrote:
On Sat, 13 May 2017 12:12:55 +0100, Robin wrote:


On 13/05/2017 11:50, Roderick Stewart wrote:
If they can do it, I don't see why the BBC couldn't.



One reason is that the contracts the BBC entered into with
producers/performers did not give them the right to do so, and the BBC
could be sued if they just ignored the inconvenient fact that people
have intellectual property rights.


As far as I know the BBC has had intellectual property rights to
everything they have produced for at least 15 years. It is written into
contracts.



As Jim Lesurf said, IP is not binary. So eg the BBC's IP rights in a
programme may not entitle it to repeat the programme. And as regards
iPlayer, the BBC/Equity agreement for 2016-17 only provided for iPlayer
use "Up to 30 days post transmission" . See
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/foi/classes/policies_procedures/equity_tv_agreement.pdf
While that's not a contractual document it chimes with what the BBC
have said in the past - eg when they moved from 7 to 30 days as their
default:

"Whilst 30 days is now the default availability period for catch-up
content, there will be some exceptions. We are able to offer some
current affairs programmes (e.g Panorama, Question Time, HARDtalk,
Click, Prime Minister’s Questions) for a full year and many of the
programmes in the BBC Four Collections are available for longer. There
will also be a small minority of programmes that have less than 30 days
availability for legal or contractual reasons (e.g. Crimewatch, Match of
the Day, news bulletins etc.)"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/internet/entries/8518caee-e777-3780-ad36-606d9a1d4be7



--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
  #68  
Old May 15th 17, 02:06 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,417
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

On Sat, 13 May 2017 10:51:03 +0100, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

A dynamic address will not change if the time intervals between
disconnecting and reconnecting are shorter than the DHCP lease time.
Try asking your ISP what their lease time is, and see if they know.


ADSL/VDSL doesn't use DHCP. It uses LCP and PPPoA/PPPoE.
(I have no idea about cable.)

I actually worked in Tech Support for an ISP once and never managed to
find out for certain, as it seemed to depend on who you asked.


Typical level of cluelessness for ISP phone monkeys then I see.
  #69  
Old May 16th 17, 06:28 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
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Posts: 1,016
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

On 15/05/2017 07:54, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Mon, 15 May 2017 01:57:56 +0100, Andy
wrote:

Johnny B Good wrote:

Woody wrote:

I have had the same WAN IP address from VM for at least a couple of
years.

I suspect that's likely true for most of VM's cable connected customers,


Do they *have* any other type of customers? I thought they ditched all
their ADSL customers to another ISP a year or two back?

Yup. Me included. Tried to dump me into TT, but I chose to go to BT
instead. Not had any problems with BT, although I'm sure some would
say that was jumping from the fat into the fire!

Moving *to* BT seems to be safe enough.
But there is hearsay evidence that moving *from* BT to any other ISP
leads to intermittent poor or no connections for a couple of months
after you change.

Jim

  #70  
Old May 18th 17, 04:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Java Jive[_2_]
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Posts: 1,641
Default BBC iPlayer wants me to sign in. Bloody cheek.

On Thu, 11 May 2017 19:15:35 -0000, "Phi" wrote:

I will have to find another way to watch the occasional good program.


"""
Hello,

We’ve made some changes to the BBC’s Privacy and Cookies Policy. This
policy governs your rights if there’s ever a problem, so it’s
important that you read them.

You can view these changes by going to bbc.co.uk and searching for our
Privacy and Cookies Policy or by clicking on the link below.

View updated Privacy & Cookies policy
(((
Note: Almost certainly personalised original URL, which when pasted
into browser lands on:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/usingthebbc/pri...ges&ns _fee=0
)))

You'll find a full PDF copy of the new terms and conditions here. As
you can see at the top of this page, this is version 2.0 and this
version now replaces all previous versions. The last version published
was 1.13, and since then there are changes in sections 3, 4, 7, 8 and
19 which include:

How we show you advertising on social media sites

How we share emails with TV Licensing to check if you are using
BBC iPlayer

Asking you to provide your gender when you register for a BBC
account.

If you are happy for these changes to take place, you don’t need to do
anything. If you don’t want these changes to apply, you’re free to
close your account. We’d be really sorry to see you go – so if you
ever have questions about your agreement with us you can read more in
Using the BBC.

All the best,

The BBC
"""
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