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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

This 'new channels' game



 
 
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  #21  
Old April 17th 17, 09:25 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 394
Default This 'new channels' game

On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 18:17:35 +0100, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 16:19:51 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

Advertising has been such an all pervading and insidious part our lives
since the advent of TV advertising (over half a century ago in the UK)
that it's almost impossible to completely shake off its influence on our
purchasing habits even when we're actively trying to nullify its effect.


You can shake off most of their influence if you don't watch them,
either by using the skip button on playback, or by editing out the
advert breaks before watching.


That's true enough except that even the short glimpses of commercial
content you are forced to contend with when skipping ad breaks on
playback will still give the advertisers some benefit despite their
reduced impact - the ads seem designed specifically to maximise impact
when viewed in this fashion or when the sound is muted during realtime
playback where you are forced to glance at the screen every 20 seconds or
so to avoid missing the end of the ad break.

This is also a problem when snipping out ad breaks from commercial TV
recordings. Thankfully, this is a very rare occupational hazard since I
gave up recording Channel Four's "The Simpsons" episodes a few years
back. I think the last commercial TV broadcast material I've recorded
during the past few years were all airings via Dave such as Red Dwarf
Episodes and a couple of other new Sci Fantasy comedies that ICBA to
check out right now. It's sufficient to say that it must be about a year
ago since I last recorded any commercially aired programmes.


It also saves an enormous amount of your time. A programme that has been
put in a 2 hour time slot will usually have an actual running time of
about 1hr 30min.


It's just under, actually. :-)

I know full well that I'll land up with a 42 minute programme out of an
hour's worth of commercial air time (or, in the case of Dave's airings of
Red Dwarf episodes, 29 minutes per 45 minutes of air time).

As you say, watching recordings that have benefited from an advertectomy,
will save a lot of time. Unfortunately, the extra editing work time can
cancel out most of the time savings so I only bother using commercial OTA
sources when the material on offer is worth the extra effort. These days,
that's very rarely the case AFAIAC.

Others, of course, may think differently and although I ought to pity
them, it's not my place to suggest that they are pitiful fools for even
considering watching "Bait Programming" in the first place. My spin on
the situation is that those "Pitiful Fools" are acting as my "Human
Shield".

--
Johnny B Good
  #22  
Old April 17th 17, 09:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 394
Default This 'new channels' game

On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 12:19:23 +0100, tim... wrote:

"Dave W" wrote in message
news

"Johnny B Good" wrote in message
...

The very layout of such stores from the aisles right down to the
individual shelving is very carefully arranged to maximise sales of
highly profitable lines whilst discouraging sales of low profit
versions provided to give the illusion of choice and is a fine example
of the "Psychological Mind Game" par excellence.


I have to grovel on my knees in Waitrose to get the cheaper items.


Oh that's where they hide them



In this day and age, it lends new meaning to the phrase, "Family
Planning" were the plan is to arrange for a steady supply of
grandchildren and great grandchildren of just the right stature and
enthusiasm for the game of "Hunt The Cheap Goodies off the bottom shelves
in your local supermarket".

With luck, you should have a steady supply of such "Little Helpers" to
see you right through to that time when you finally land up in sheltered
accommodation or an "Old Folks Home". :-)

--
Johnny B Good
  #23  
Old April 17th 17, 10:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
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Posts: 1,676
Default This 'new channels' game


wrote in message
...
On Monday, 17 April 2017 10:06:33 UTC+1, UnsteadyKen wrote:
What in ****s name happened to quality TV I remember?


Not sure I agree.

Yes there are a lot of repeats and a lot of the repeats are of stuff
which wasn't great first time round and doesn't really warrant being
repeated.

But I can remember (weekend afternoons especially) when BBC1 and ITV
would both be showing the *same* football match and the only
offering on BBC2 was some ghastly Western or WW2 film (usually John
Wayne).

Then there would be something good on, "except for viewers in Wales,
Scotland, Northern Ireland" who instead of getting Victoria Wood
live by satellite from Mars would be entertained by "Watching Grass
Grow".



No, no, no. The favourite peak teatime watching in Wales (when the
rest of the UK was watching local news) was things like dicussions
about diseases in pigs trotters and the like - in Welsh.



--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #24  
Old April 18th 17, 12:08 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
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Posts: 1,720
Default This 'new channels' game

On 17/04/2017 20:50, John Hall wrote:

Incidentally, I was twelve at the time, and Julie Christie was the first woman I ever fell in love with.


Hard to get a shag under those circumstances.

Bill

  #26  
Old April 18th 17, 09:58 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,040
Default This 'new channels' game

On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 21:25:31 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

Advertising has been such an all pervading and insidious part our lives
since the advent of TV advertising (over half a century ago in the UK)
that it's almost impossible to completely shake off its influence on our
purchasing habits even when we're actively trying to nullify its effect.


You can shake off most of their influence if you don't watch them,
either by using the skip button on playback, or by editing out the
advert breaks before watching.


That's true enough except that even the short glimpses of commercial
content you are forced to contend with when skipping ad breaks on
playback will still give the advertisers some benefit despite their
reduced impact - the ads seem designed specifically to maximise impact
when viewed in this fashion or when the sound is muted during realtime
playback where you are forced to glance at the screen every 20 seconds or
so to avoid missing the end of the ad break


How does this give any benefit to anybody if it doesn't persuade me to
buy the product? Adverts are irritatating enough when I see them in
full, but the occasional glimpse of a tiny part of one in fast forward
won't even have time to try to persuade me of anything.

Rod.
  #27  
Old April 18th 17, 03:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave W
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Posts: 236
Default This 'new channels' game


"pamela" wrote in message
...
On 09:49 14 Apr 2017, The Other John wrote:

You seem to have forgotten Brian that the primary function of
these channels is to deliver advertising. So called
'programmes' are a necessary evil to fill the gaps therein, so
they buy the cheapest dross they can find. The simplest
solution is to edit your channel list and you end up with about
half a dozen of the least worst!


I believe many scheduling people aim for the "least bad" programme at
any given time in order to capture audience eyeballs.

Overall there's not much to watch on Freeview. And some of the ad
breaks go on for ever. Perhaps the odd BBC programme is worth
watching but those are getting more scarce.

I've given up bothering to even look through the guide and rarely
tune in to a Freeview channel.


Don't paid-for channels have just as much advertising and trailers as
Freeview (15 minutes per hour)? I'm interested in knowing how many minutes
per hour you pay for?
--
Dave W


  #28  
Old April 18th 17, 04:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark[_6_]
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Posts: 82
Default This 'new channels' game

On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 10:58:15 +0100, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 21:25:31 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

Advertising has been such an all pervading and insidious part our lives
since the advent of TV advertising (over half a century ago in the UK)
that it's almost impossible to completely shake off its influence on our
purchasing habits even when we're actively trying to nullify its effect.

You can shake off most of their influence if you don't watch them,
either by using the skip button on playback, or by editing out the
advert breaks before watching.


That's true enough except that even the short glimpses of commercial
content you are forced to contend with when skipping ad breaks on
playback will still give the advertisers some benefit despite their
reduced impact - the ads seem designed specifically to maximise impact
when viewed in this fashion or when the sound is muted during realtime
playback where you are forced to glance at the screen every 20 seconds or
so to avoid missing the end of the ad break


How does this give any benefit to anybody if it doesn't persuade me to
buy the product? Adverts are irritatating enough when I see them in
full, but the occasional glimpse of a tiny part of one in fast forward
won't even have time to try to persuade me of anything.


I avoid adverts if at all possible. If I do see one I make a mental
note never to buy anything from the company (unless I already use
them).

  #29  
Old April 19th 17, 12:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,040
Default This 'new channels' game

On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 16:08:57 +0100, "Dave W"
wrote:


Don't paid-for channels have just as much advertising and trailers as
Freeview (15 minutes per hour)? I'm interested in knowing how many minutes
per hour you pay for?


When I occasionally watch a paid-for movie on Amazon, there are no
adverts, just the movie. This is an improvement on rental DVDs, which
frequently did have them.

rod.
 




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