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  #11  
Old March 19th 17, 12:48 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David Wade[_3_]
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Posts: 2
Default serving the public

On 19/03/2017 10:51, Brian Gaff wrote:
I suspect that a lot of these decisions are now being made due to the
massive hike in business rates on shops, making margins very close. This is
how to kill the high street.
I agree though that he could have been more forthcoming on the real issues,
as nobody turns away a valued customer unless they are a pest, and I cannot
imagine yourself every being seen this way.....
Brian


There hasn't been a massive hike on Business Rates, well except in a few
areas where prosperity has caused property values to rise. I know its
not a shop, but one of our nearby MicroBreweries has had his rates
reduced to virtually zero...
  #12  
Old March 19th 17, 02:15 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 406
Default serving the public

On Sunday, 19 March 2017 13:48:09 UTC, David Wade wrote:
On 19/03/2017 10:51, Brian Gaff wrote:
I suspect that a lot of these decisions are now being made due to the
massive hike in business rates on shops, making margins very close. This is
how to kill the high street.
I agree though that he could have been more forthcoming on the real issues,
as nobody turns away a valued customer unless they are a pest, and I cannot
imagine yourself every being seen this way.....
Brian


There hasn't been a massive hike on Business Rates, well except in a few
areas where prosperity has caused property values to rise. I know its
not a shop, but one of our nearby MicroBreweries has had his rates
reduced to virtually zero...


Rates are based on the market rent. In many cases the actual rent paid by the occupier. If you rent a shop on a busy city centre street for £50kpa then expect that to be its rate-able value and to pay roughly 50% of the rent in rates.

A few free holders apart, few businesses can complain about their rates bill if they are prepared in a free market to pay the rent it is based upon.
  #13  
Old March 19th 17, 02:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
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Posts: 351
Default serving the public



"David Wade" wrote in message
news
On 19/03/2017 10:51, Brian Gaff wrote:
I suspect that a lot of these decisions are now being made due to the
massive hike in business rates on shops, making margins very close. This
is
how to kill the high street.
I agree though that he could have been more forthcoming on the real
issues,
as nobody turns away a valued customer unless they are a pest, and I
cannot
imagine yourself every being seen this way.....
Brian


There hasn't been a massive hike on Business Rates, well except in a few
areas where prosperity has caused property values to rise.


which as the properly will be rented will be of no value to the business
inside the property

so why should it pay extra rates because of it?

tim



  #14  
Old March 19th 17, 03:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bob[_12_]
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Posts: 32
Default serving the public

On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 08:15:54 -0700, R. Mark Clayton wrote:

On Sunday, 19 March 2017 13:48:09 UTC, David Wade wrote:
On 19/03/2017 10:51, Brian Gaff wrote:
I suspect that a lot of these decisions are now being made due to the
massive hike in business rates on shops, making margins very close.
This is how to kill the high street.
I agree though that he could have been more forthcoming on the real
issues,
as nobody turns away a valued customer unless they are a pest, and I
cannot imagine yourself every being seen this way.....
Brian


There hasn't been a massive hike on Business Rates, well except in a
few areas where prosperity has caused property values to rise. I know
its not a shop, but one of our nearby MicroBreweries has had his rates
reduced to virtually zero...


Rates are based on the market rent. In many cases the actual rent paid
by the occupier. If you rent a shop on a busy city centre street for
£50kpa then expect that to be its rate-able value and to pay roughly 50%
of the rent in rates.

A few free holders apart, few businesses can complain about their rates
bill if they are prepared in a free market to pay the rent it is based
upon.


At last, someone has pointed out the truth behind the scare stories. I
do wish that so-called reporters/journalists would do a little bit of
research before they go wild with their stories.
  #15  
Old March 19th 17, 03:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bob[_12_]
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Posts: 32
Default serving the public

On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 15:43:05 +0000, tim... wrote:

"David Wade" wrote in message
news
On 19/03/2017 10:51, Brian Gaff wrote:
I suspect that a lot of these decisions are now being made due to the
massive hike in business rates on shops,


There hasn't been a massive hike on Business Rates, well except in a
few areas where prosperity has caused property values to rise.


which as the properly will be rented will be of no value to the business
inside the property


I don't follow the logic here?

The business creates the profit to pay for (amongst other things) rent
and rates.

The more profit a location will generate the greater the rent that will
be paid to be in that location.


so why should it pay extra rates because of it?


Because the business creates more profit. Unless you are saying that
everything of a given size should pay the same amount?
  #16  
Old March 19th 17, 05:10 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris Youlden[_6_]
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Posts: 3
Default serving the public

On 19/03/2017 16:54, Bob wrote:
On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 15:43:05 +0000, tim... wrote:

"David Wade" wrote in message
news
On 19/03/2017 10:51, Brian Gaff wrote:
I suspect that a lot of these decisions are now being made due to the
massive hike in business rates on shops,

There hasn't been a massive hike on Business Rates, well except in a
few areas where prosperity has caused property values to rise.


which as the properly will be rented will be of no value to the business
inside the property


I don't follow the logic here?

The business creates the profit to pay for (amongst other things) rent
and rates.

The more profit a location will generate the greater the rent that will
be paid to be in that location.


so why should it pay extra rates because of it?


Because the business creates more profit. Unless you are saying that
everything of a given size should pay the same amount?


So McDonalds will pay far more rent and rates than the Phone Bits shop
next door, then?

That might explain why Burger King, McDonalds, Burtons and Dorothy
Perkins amongst others have all closed their Poole town centre shops
whilst the phone bits shops, Pound shops, and pawn brokers happily carry on.


--

Chris

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

  #17  
Old March 19th 17, 06:07 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
critcher[_6_]
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Posts: 51
Default serving the public

On 18/03/2017 16:26, Bill Wright wrote:
For many years I've used a particular butcher. I must have spent
thousands in that shop. I believe in building up a relationship.
Yesterday I asked for something I often buy: beef dripping (it makes
fantastic roasties).
"Don't keep it any more."
"Why?"
"Not many people wanted it." He shrugged and turned away.
I was going to say, "Well I buy it," or something like that, but then I
thought, "Why should I bother?"
It wasn't the lack of beef dripping that did it. It was the dismissive
attitude and the shrug.
Those of us who live by serving the public would do well to remember
that if a good customer wants something that we don't have, it might be
wise to research it with a view to getting him some. If it really is
impossible, it would be good to show some sign of apology and offer an
explanation.
There are two other butchers in the area, just as good, and one of them
is closer to home. So that's where I'll be spending my fifty quids in
future.

Bill



you could buy beef dripping in block form (like 1/2 lb of butter), but
of course it doesn't have the jelly. But it is great for roasties.
  #18  
Old March 19th 17, 06:12 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bob[_12_]
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Posts: 32
Default serving the public

On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 18:10:12 +0000, Chris Youlden wrote:

On 19/03/2017 16:54, Bob wrote:
On Sun, 19 Mar 2017 15:43:05 +0000, tim... wrote:

"David Wade" wrote in message
news On 19/03/2017 10:51, Brian Gaff wrote:
I suspect that a lot of these decisions are now being made due to
the massive hike in business rates on shops,

There hasn't been a massive hike on Business Rates, well except in a
few areas where prosperity has caused property values to rise.

which as the properly will be rented will be of no value to the
business inside the property


I don't follow the logic here?

The business creates the profit to pay for (amongst other things) rent
and rates.

The more profit a location will generate the greater the rent that will
be paid to be in that location.


so why should it pay extra rates because of it?


Because the business creates more profit. Unless you are saying that
everything of a given size should pay the same amount?


So McDonalds will pay far more rent and rates than the Phone Bits shop
next door, then?


If the shops are the same size they would be expected by a landlord to
pay similar amounts. Length of lease and strength of covenant will of
course affect that. Cheap shops move in when brands move out and rents
fall.


That might explain why Burger King, McDonalds, Burtons and Dorothy
Perkins amongst others have all closed their Poole town centre shops
whilst the phone bits shops, Pound shops, and pawn brokers happily carry
on.


Last time I walked down Poole High Street it was filled by cheap shops
and charity shops. Dolphin centre also had a sense of struggling
somewhat.

I expect that the business generated for each of the retailers you
mention (Burtons excepted as they went into liquidation AIR) having
closed was insufficient for them to keep open. The increase in vacant
units will then drive down rents overall as landlords seek to keep some
income by having an occupier of some kind to mitigate their costs. Think
of pop-up Christmas shops for example that are only open for a few weeks
but generate some income for the landlord.

The lowering of rental values then attracts the businesses that cannot
afford the previous higher rents.

Shopping Centres OTOH work rents on a different basis - usually a
threshold rent per unit plus a turnover rent on top of that.
  #19  
Old March 19th 17, 08:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Benderthe.evilrobot
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Posts: 146
Default serving the public


"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 18 Mar 2017 21:55:19 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

For many years I've used a particular butcher. I must have spent
thousands
in that shop. I believe in building up a relationship. Yesterday I
asked
for something I often buy: beef dripping (it makes fantastic roasties).

Apparently the latest trendy thing is goose fat - jars of it are common
in
various stores.

Hardly the latest thing. I've been using it on bread and toast for
many years instead of olive-oil-based spreads, the taste of which I
strongly dislike. Goose fat often tastes a bit like dripping and is
full of unsaturates; not quite as good as olive oil, but a lot better
than butter or dripping. The softer it is in the jar, the more
unsaturated fat/oil it contains. Tesco's Finest is very good. Spreads
straight from the fridge. In fact if you don't keep it in the fridge
it goes quite runny.


Try Mascarpone cheese (Sainsbury's is best) instead of butter,


I tried a pack of camembert from sainsburys - now I'm wondering how to stop
my fridge smelling worse than my feet ever have wearing work boots in a
heatwave.........

  #20  
Old March 19th 17, 08:44 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Benderthe.evilrobot
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Posts: 146
Default serving the public


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 18/03/2017 23:04, Max Demian wrote:
On 18/03/2017 16:26, Bill Wright wrote:
For many years I've used a particular butcher. I must have spent
thousands in that shop. I believe in building up a relationship.
Yesterday I asked for something I often buy: beef dripping (it makes
fantastic roasties).
"Don't keep it any more."
"Why?"
"Not many people wanted it." He shrugged and turned away.


Is butcher's dripping any better than the stuff you can buy at
supermarkets, e.g. "Britannia" brand?


It seems to be.

That's too bland for me. I used to
like home made beef dripping, in a pudding basin, with jelly underneath.
A rare treat on bread or toast in a middle class home.


Pork dripping is better for that purpose in my opinion.


Specifically bacon dripping - saltier the better.

 




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