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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Hybrid electric generators



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 8th 17, 09:51 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Hybrid electric generators

There's just been an item on the 10:30pm BBC 1 local news for London
about using a hybrid generator to supply the electricity for the
operations to demolish a Ford site in Dagenham.

The hybrid generator uses diesel and electricity - so when it's running
on electricity, it's using electricity to generate electricity.

Are we approaching the time when efficiencies of more than 100% can be
obtained?
--
Ian
  #2  
Old March 9th 17, 06:28 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tim+[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 182
Default Hybrid electric generators

Ian Jackson wrote:
There's just been an item on the 10:30pm BBC 1 local news for London
about using a hybrid generator to supply the electricity for the
operations to demolish a Ford site in Dagenham.

The hybrid generator uses diesel and electricity - so when it's running
on electricity, it's using electricity to generate electricity.

Are we approaching the time when efficiencies of more than 100% can be
obtained?


Unless you can provide a link to the original story I think either you or
the broadcaster has misunderstood/misquoted something.

A quick internet search suggests that hybrid generators have a battery bank
to supply power during times of low power demand when the generator would
normally be working at low efficiency.

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls
  #3  
Old March 9th 17, 07:45 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Hybrid electric generators

In message , Tim+
writes
Ian Jackson wrote:
There's just been an item on the 10:30pm BBC 1 local news for London
about using a hybrid generator to supply the electricity for the
operations to demolish a Ford site in Dagenham.

The hybrid generator uses diesel and electricity - so when it's running
on electricity, it's using electricity to generate electricity.

Are we approaching the time when efficiencies of more than 100% can be
obtained?


Unless you can provide a link to the original story I think either you or
the broadcaster has misunderstood/misquoted something.

A quick internet search suggests that hybrid generators have a battery bank
to supply power during times of low power demand when the generator would
normally be working at low efficiency.

Yes - I suppose diesel-electric hybrid generators do make sense, as they
allow a smaller diesel engine to be used for most of the time, with a
trickle-charged battery providing a bit more umph when demand is high.
It's just that it sounded a bit odd when I heard it!
--
Ian
  #4  
Old March 9th 17, 08:27 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,564
Default Hybrid electric generators

I did not get that either.
I just do not get the thing at all. Surely the only other way would be to
use a fuel cell.


What one really needs is a way to harness the wasted energy in bull****.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Ian Jackson" wrote in message
...
There's just been an item on the 10:30pm BBC 1 local news for London about
using a hybrid generator to supply the electricity for the operations to
demolish a Ford site in Dagenham.

The hybrid generator uses diesel and electricity - so when it's running on
electricity, it's using electricity to generate electricity.

Are we approaching the time when efficiencies of more than 100% can be
obtained?
--
Ian



  #5  
Old March 9th 17, 08:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,564
Default Hybrid electric generators

Yes but this was not what the piece actually said. I heard it on both itv
and bbc, and I suspect the same source for both.
The one thing we all need is an efficient way to store electricity, and
that seems to have eluded people for many years.
I wonder what the cost of making, say a single use alkaline battery is and
the cost of disp0osing of it, ie what is its efficiency from start to end.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Tim+" wrote in message
news
Ian Jackson wrote:
There's just been an item on the 10:30pm BBC 1 local news for London
about using a hybrid generator to supply the electricity for the
operations to demolish a Ford site in Dagenham.

The hybrid generator uses diesel and electricity - so when it's running
on electricity, it's using electricity to generate electricity.

Are we approaching the time when efficiencies of more than 100% can be
obtained?


Unless you can provide a link to the original story I think either you or
the broadcaster has misunderstood/misquoted something.

A quick internet search suggests that hybrid generators have a battery
bank
to supply power during times of low power demand when the generator would
normally be working at low efficiency.

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls



  #6  
Old March 9th 17, 08:35 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Robin[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 392
Default Hybrid electric generators

On 09/03/2017 08:45, Ian Jackson wrote:


Yes - I suppose diesel-electric hybrid generators do make sense, as they
allow a smaller diesel engine to be used for most of the time, with a
trickle-charged battery providing a bit more umph when demand is high.
It's just that it sounded a bit odd when I heard it!


I think it's t'other way round for some at least:

- diesel runs when lots of umph required and charges battery pack at the
same time

- diesel off and battery pack supplies low loads

One benefit is that there's no need to run a loud diesel generator
overnight just for lights, security, security guard's satellite TV[1], etc.


[1] it's the thought that counts

--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
  #7  
Old March 9th 17, 10:49 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,190
Default Hybrid electric generators

On Wed, 8 Mar 2017 22:51:50 +0000, Ian Jackson
wrote:

There's just been an item on the 10:30pm BBC 1 local news for London
about using a hybrid generator to supply the electricity for the
operations to demolish a Ford site in Dagenham.

The hybrid generator uses diesel and electricity - so when it's running
on electricity, it's using electricity to generate electricity.

Are we approaching the time when efficiencies of more than 100% can be
obtained?


Not yet!

This describes a hybrid generator system. As it says, the power is
provided by the battery, with the diesel generator running only when it
is needed to recharge the battery:
http://www.powerengineeringint.com/a...r-systems.html

THE BATTERY BECOMES THE PRIMARY POWER SOURCE

A potential solution to these challenges is now emerging in the form
of hybrid power systems incorporating a cycling rechargeable
battery. Rather than using the diesel generator as the primary power
source, the hybrid system relies on the battery as its primary
source of power, with the genset providing the recharging current.

This approach is targeted mainly at installations where grid
connectivity is unavailable or unstable, requiring diesel generators
to be running for at least 30 per cent of each day. In addition to
new-build sites, this system can also be used as a retrofit
solution.

The main advantage of this hybrid system is a reduction in operating
costs (OPEX) of 50 to 85 per cent combined with a reduction in
carbon emissions of 48 to 80 per cent, depending on site load,
compared with continuous generator operation. The gensets only need
to run for a fraction of the time, reducing fuel consumption,
emissions and maintenance requirements.

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
 




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