A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

New TV channel for BBC in Scotland



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old February 27th 17, 09:33 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,195
Default New TV channel for BBC in Scotland

In article , Bill Taylor
wrote:

You've not heard of these strange things called "lending libraries"
then. Oddly enough they are still quite widely used, although I expect
it won't be long before the influence of those who think everything has
its price will close them all.


Sadly, many public libraries *are* being shut down or converted into other
kinds of uses as Councils find ways to "save money".

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scot...o/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

  #52  
Old February 27th 17, 09:37 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,195
Default New TV channel for BBC in Scotland

In article , Norman Wells
wrote:
"Bill Taylor" wrote in message
...


You've not heard of these strange things called "lending libraries"
then. Oddly enough they are still quite widely used, although I expect
it won't be long before the influence of those who think everything
has its price will close them all.


Borrowing from public lending libraries has reduced from over 400
million issues in 1997/8 to 247 million in 2013/14, a decline of about
40%, and it has fallen substantially since.


That's quite a dramatic reduction over just 20 years.


There comes a time when their purpose and value for money have to be
questioned.


However there also comes a time when people need to avoid jumping to
conclusions. The reason for the fall in the last decade or so is the
reduction in the number of libraries and their funding. People can't borrow
books from a library that has closed. Nor can they borrow one it can't
afford to stock.

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scot...o/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

  #53  
Old February 27th 17, 05:04 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 949
Default New TV channel for BBC in Scotland


"Jim Lesurf" wrote in message
...
In article , Norman Wells
wrote:
"Bill Taylor" wrote in message
...


You've not heard of these strange things called "lending libraries"
then. Oddly enough they are still quite widely used, although I expect
it won't be long before the influence of those who think everything
has its price will close them all.


Borrowing from public lending libraries has reduced from over 400
million issues in 1997/8 to 247 million in 2013/14, a decline of about
40%, and it has fallen substantially since.


That's quite a dramatic reduction over just 20 years.


There comes a time when their purpose and value for money have to be
questioned.


However there also comes a time when people need to avoid jumping to
conclusions. The reason for the fall in the last decade or so is the
reduction in the number of libraries and their funding. People can't borrow
books from a library that has closed. Nor can they borrow one it can't
afford to stock.


It's down to many things, but I think the closure of libraries follows the reduction
in borrowing, not the other way round.

There are many other factors at work, the major one being of course the internet
which has slaughtered most use of reference works in libraries. Ebook readers have
also had a major effect on fossil book borrowing. No-one now takes a pile of
paperbacks on holiday to read, for example.

The fact is public libraries have had their day, and will inevitably decline further
and close. That will leave some of the middle classes rather tearful, but they just
have to leave behind their Famous Five 1950's fantasy images of cosy family life
round the coal fire and move on.

  #54  
Old February 28th 17, 09:43 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,195
Default New TV channel for BBC in Scotland

In article , Norman Wells
wrote:
However there also comes a time when people need to avoid jumping to
conclusions. The reason for the fall in the last decade or so is the
reduction in the number of libraries and their funding. People can't
borrow books from a library that has closed. Nor can they borrow one
it can't afford to stock.


It's down to many things, but I think the closure of libraries follows
the reduction in borrowing, not the other way round.


You may think that, but the details given in Private Eye as they've
documented this issue-by-issue in recent years shows otherwise.

There are many other factors at work, the major one being of course the
internet which has slaughtered most use of reference works in
libraries. Ebook readers have also had a major effect on fossil book
borrowing. No-one now takes a pile of paperbacks on holiday to read,
for example.


Your "no-one" assertion yet again shows you're rather divorced from
reality. :-)

The *reality* is that public libraries have been providing services like
internet access for the people who *don't* have their own machines for
this. And allow people to access e-books as well as paper ones.

One point to clarify, though, is that your vague wording blurs two
quite distinct periods. Until 5-10 years ago there was a gradual
decline in both borrowing and library provision. But more recently
library provision has been pushed off a financial cliff. The situation
is actually worse than the official figures because many councils
have converted from libraries to 'centers' with a few books called
a library. But which may have few/no/amateur librarians.


Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scot...o/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

  #55  
Old February 28th 17, 05:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 949
Default New TV channel for BBC in Scotland

"Jim Lesurf" wrote in message
...
In article , Norman Wells
wrote:
However there also comes a time when people need to avoid jumping to
conclusions. The reason for the fall in the last decade or so is the
reduction in the number of libraries and their funding. People can't
borrow books from a library that has closed. Nor can they borrow one
it can't afford to stock.


It's down to many things, but I think the closure of libraries follows
the reduction in borrowing, not the other way round.


You may think that, but the details given in Private Eye as they've
documented this issue-by-issue in recent years shows otherwise.

There are many other factors at work, the major one being of course the
internet which has slaughtered most use of reference works in
libraries. Ebook readers have also had a major effect on fossil book
borrowing. No-one now takes a pile of paperbacks on holiday to read,
for example.


Your "no-one" assertion yet again shows you're rather divorced from
reality. :-)


I don't think so. I go on quite a lot of holidays, and I see an awful lot of people
reading stuff on Kindles and the like. Every one of those is avoiding fossil books,
and with very good reason.

The *reality* is that public libraries have been providing services like
internet access for the people who *don't* have their own machines for
this. And allow people to access e-books as well as paper ones.

One point to clarify, though, is that your vague wording blurs two
quite distinct periods. Until 5-10 years ago there was a gradual
decline in both borrowing and library provision. But more recently
library provision has been pushed off a financial cliff. The situation
is actually worse than the official figures because many councils
have converted from libraries to 'centers' with a few books called
a library. But which may have few/no/amateur librarians.


It's bound to be a downward spiral. Fewer books borrowed = library closures = fewer
books borrowed, and it becomes a bit chicken and egg. But it can't and won't be
reversed however much you may wish otherwise. People have changed their reading
habits too much since the 1950s and it's only the staid over-70's who think they
really serve any useful purpose. And they're mistaken.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2017 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.