A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Humax overheating



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old February 22nd 17, 03:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Yellow[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 114
Default Update: Humax overheating

In article , lid
says...

On Wed, 22 Feb 2017 14:17:50 -0000
Yellow wrote:

In article ,
lid
says...

On Tue, 21 Feb 2017 14:28:00 +0000
Davey wrote:

On Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:22:23 -0000
"Paul D Smith" wrote:

"Chris Hogg" wrote in message
...

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 22:26:48 -0000, "Benderthe.evilrobot"
wrote:


I've seen someone inject fresh oil into fan bearings with a
diabetic syringe.

Yep. Use a light machine oil, 3-in-1 or sewing machine oil. A
small drop on the end of a pin applied once or twice is all it
needs. ++++++++
If you need to replace it, consider whether you can fit a
slightly larger fan and look for the 'silent' fans sold for
media player PCs. Did this years ago with an old Xbox v1 and
the result was a much quieter box - a larger fan can often also
be run slower for the same throughput.

Out of interest, how hot does this box get? I've got the Fox T2
(Freeview) and it doesn't even have a fan.

Paul DS.


Until very recently, I have never watched its temperature. But
when it locked up the other evening, it was reporting an Air
Temp. of 55 C. Now, with a minimum fan speed of about 50%, it
seems to stay in the 35~40 C range, even when recording two
programmes at once, if that makes any effective difference.

Noise has never been a problem, and I am hard of hearing!

I have a couple of busy days ahead, so this 'lube job' will have
to wait a little bit. But I will take dimensions and label data
of the fan while it's out of the box.

No response yet from Humax, surprise, surprise.


Received from Humax:

"Hi,

Thank you for contacting Humax.

Sadly we no longer manufacture the HDR-FOXT2 so we no longer offer a
repair and can not advise the spec on spare parts.


Best Regards, etc."

At least they replied, which is more than some companies would have
done. But they could at least have given me the details of the fan.
Oh well.


Does the fan not have a label on it?


Yes, but I cannot read it without removing it from the Humax. I had
hoped to be able to order a new one, and then to be able to do
a straight swap, only dismantling the PVR once. But as I have since
found that it is working, although sluggishly, I will remove it,
photograph the label, lubricate the fan, and re-install it. I will then
have its details with which to work and find a replacement.
It might be the same as the one from a different unit described earlier,
but it might not.


I hope it goes OK and let us know how you get on.
  #52  
Old February 22nd 17, 03:55 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,257
Default Update: Humax overheating

On Wed, 22 Feb 2017 15:43:43 -0000
Yellow wrote:

In article , lid
says...

On Wed, 22 Feb 2017 14:17:50 -0000
Yellow wrote:

In article ,
lid says...

On Tue, 21 Feb 2017 14:28:00 +0000
Davey wrote:

On Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:22:23 -0000
"Paul D Smith" wrote:

"Chris Hogg" wrote in message
...

On Mon, 20 Feb 2017 22:26:48 -0000, "Benderthe.evilrobot"
wrote:


I've seen someone inject fresh oil into fan bearings with a
diabetic syringe.

Yep. Use a light machine oil, 3-in-1 or sewing machine oil.
A small drop on the end of a pin applied once or twice is
all it needs. ++++++++
If you need to replace it, consider whether you can fit a
slightly larger fan and look for the 'silent' fans sold for
media player PCs. Did this years ago with an old Xbox v1 and
the result was a much quieter box - a larger fan can often
also be run slower for the same throughput.

Out of interest, how hot does this box get? I've got the
Fox T2 (Freeview) and it doesn't even have a fan.

Paul DS.


Until very recently, I have never watched its temperature. But
when it locked up the other evening, it was reporting an Air
Temp. of 55 C. Now, with a minimum fan speed of about 50%, it
seems to stay in the 35~40 C range, even when recording two
programmes at once, if that makes any effective difference.

Noise has never been a problem, and I am hard of hearing!

I have a couple of busy days ahead, so this 'lube job' will
have to wait a little bit. But I will take dimensions and
label data of the fan while it's out of the box.

No response yet from Humax, surprise, surprise.


Received from Humax:

"Hi,

Thank you for contacting Humax.

Sadly we no longer manufacture the HDR-FOXT2 so we no longer
offer a repair and can not advise the spec on spare parts.


Best Regards, etc."

At least they replied, which is more than some companies would
have done. But they could at least have given me the details of
the fan. Oh well.

Does the fan not have a label on it?


Yes, but I cannot read it without removing it from the Humax. I had
hoped to be able to order a new one, and then to be able to do
a straight swap, only dismantling the PVR once. But as I have since
found that it is working, although sluggishly, I will remove it,
photograph the label, lubricate the fan, and re-install it. I will
then have its details with which to work and find a replacement.
It might be the same as the one from a different unit described
earlier, but it might not.


I hope it goes OK and let us know how you get on.


Thank you, and I will.

--
Davey.
  #53  
Old February 22nd 17, 04:35 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave W
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 265
Default Update: Humax overheating


"Benderthe.evilrobot" wrote in message
...

"Vir Campestris" wrote in message
...
On 20/02/2017 23:06, Ian Jackson wrote:
I've oiled computer fans (with WD40 and 3-in-1).


Both I take it?

WD40 will sometimes unstick things as the solvents go in. Then they
evaporate, and leave the sticky Water Displacing coating which is where
the product got its name.

It's not a lubricant.


Not only that - but it washes out or dilutes any lubricant that remains
from before.

In extreme cases it can do more harm than good.

I thought it would wash out the old stiff lubricant from a fan heater, which
it did, but I followed immediately with 3-in-1 lookalike oil from
Wilkinsons. Let's see how long it lasts.
--
Dave W


  #54  
Old February 22nd 17, 07:49 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Benderthe.evilrobot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 148
Default Update: Humax overheating


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 21/02/2017 21:47, Benderthe.evilrobot wrote:

"Vir Campestris" wrote in message
...
On 20/02/2017 23:06, Ian Jackson wrote:
I've oiled computer fans (with WD40 and 3-in-1).

Both I take it?

WD40 will sometimes unstick things as the solvents go in. Then they
evaporate, and leave the sticky Water Displacing coating which is
where the product got its name.

It's not a lubricant.


Not only that - but it washes out or dilutes any lubricant that remains
from before.

In extreme cases it can do more harm than good.


I once totally wrecked a complicated multipole switch with it.


Many electronic components are made with ABS/polycarbonate, it just crumbles
if you subject it to any kind of hydrocarbon solvent.

Once I squirted switch cleaner on a VCR mode switch and watched in amazement
as it turned into tiny granules in front of my eyes.

Most motorcycle helmets are ABS - cleaning with any kind of solvent or
applying stickers voids the warranty.

On the advice of an acclaimed bicycle maintenance book I used PTFE fortified
bicycle grease on the gear change twistgrip - about a week later the plastic
housing split open as I was changing gear.

  #55  
Old February 22nd 17, 08:00 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Benderthe.evilrobot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 148
Default Update: Humax overheating


"Dave W" wrote in message
news

"Benderthe.evilrobot" wrote in
message ...

"Vir Campestris" wrote in message
...
On 20/02/2017 23:06, Ian Jackson wrote:
I've oiled computer fans (with WD40 and 3-in-1).

Both I take it?

WD40 will sometimes unstick things as the solvents go in. Then they
evaporate, and leave the sticky Water Displacing coating which is where
the product got its name.

It's not a lubricant.


Not only that - but it washes out or dilutes any lubricant that remains
from before.

In extreme cases it can do more harm than good.

I thought it would wash out the old stiff lubricant from a fan heater,
which it did, but I followed immediately with 3-in-1 lookalike oil from
Wilkinsons. Let's see how long it lasts.


Someone told me 3 in 1 is vegetable based oil. Apparently its prone to
solidifying in some cases.

What I use is neat Slick50. Its a bit thick and sticky to run into tiny fan
bearings, so I use WD40/GT85 to wet the bearing and to some extent dilute
the Slick50.

The fan on my PC has outlived several motherboards since being serviced with
PTFE lubricant.

  #56  
Old February 22nd 17, 08:09 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Benderthe.evilrobot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 148
Default Update: Humax overheating


"Chris Green" wrote in message
...
Ian Jackson wrote:
In message , Chris Green
writes
Vir Campestris wrote:
On 20/02/2017 23:06, Ian Jackson wrote:
I've oiled computer fans (with WD40 and 3-in-1).

Both I take it?

WD40 will sometimes unstick things as the solvents go in. Then they
evaporate, and leave the sticky Water Displacing coating which is
where
the product got its name.

It's not a lubricant.

Exactly my experience with it. If you use it in the classic
application of getting a cold, damp petrol engine started by
squirting it on the distributor and leads (OK, old petrol engine)
then it works at the time but a few weeks later the sticky residue has
made all sorts of dirt, dust etc. stick to the HT leads etc. The
final result is often a worse problem than the simple damp that was
originally dispersed.


But who would spray a lubricant on a distributor and HT leads? I
wouldn't choose to (certainly not without intending to clean things up
at the earliest opportunity).

This was surely one of its advertised uses.


It displaces water sure enough, but as stated; the oil film gathers dust and
grime that can cause tracking on HT leads.

Generally I find just wiping the distributor and leads with a dry absorbent
cloth does the trick.

Most motorcycles have potted coils with non replaceable HT leads - not that
it stopped me replacing a few. A film of oil such as WD40 would've made it
extremely difficult to seal the new leads in.

  #57  
Old February 22nd 17, 08:31 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tim+[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 190
Default Update: Humax overheating

Benderthe.evilrobot wrote:


On the advice of an acclaimed bicycle maintenance book I used PTFE fortified
bicycle grease on the gear change twistgrip - about a week later the plastic
housing split open as I was changing gear.



Yeah but, twist grip gear changers are only fitted on bikes at the cheap
end of the market so are unlikely to be high quality in the first place.

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls
  #58  
Old February 22nd 17, 09:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Benderthe.evilrobot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 148
Default Update: Humax overheating


"Tim+" wrote in message
news
Benderthe.evilrobot wrote:


On the advice of an acclaimed bicycle maintenance book I used PTFE
fortified
bicycle grease on the gear change twistgrip - about a week later the
plastic
housing split open as I was changing gear.



Yeah but, twist grip gear changers are only fitted on bikes at the cheap
end of the market so are unlikely to be high quality in the first place.


Was that remark supposed to belittle me?

I have a long memory of peoples past posting history.

  #59  
Old February 22nd 17, 09:42 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Tim+[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 190
Default Update: Humax overheating

Benderthe.evilrobot wrote:

"Tim+" wrote in message
news
Benderthe.evilrobot wrote:


On the advice of an acclaimed bicycle maintenance book I used PTFE
fortified
bicycle grease on the gear change twistgrip - about a week later the
plastic
housing split open as I was changing gear.



Yeah but, twist grip gear changers are only fitted on bikes at the cheap
end of the market so are unlikely to be high quality in the first place.


Was that remark supposed to belittle me?


No, just pointing out that a twistgrip gearchange disintegrating isn't
necessarily proof of a lubricant induced problem.

Tim


--
Please don't feed the trolls
  #60  
Old February 22nd 17, 09:56 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Benderthe.evilrobot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 148
Default Update: Humax overheating


"Tim+" wrote in message
news
Benderthe.evilrobot wrote:

"Tim+" wrote in message
news
Benderthe.evilrobot wrote:


On the advice of an acclaimed bicycle maintenance book I used PTFE
fortified
bicycle grease on the gear change twistgrip - about a week later the
plastic
housing split open as I was changing gear.



Yeah but, twist grip gear changers are only fitted on bikes at the cheap
end of the market so are unlikely to be high quality in the first place.


Was that remark supposed to belittle me?


No, just pointing out that a twistgrip gearchange disintegrating isn't
necessarily proof of a lubricant induced problem.


The guy in Halfords announced "they only last a couple of years" as he
merrily squirted GT85 on a showroom model - they're ABS and the solvent in
penetrating oil will destroy it.

The one on my bike was so old I had trouble finding a catalogue example of
the bike - it worked just fine till I lubricated it.

I'm quite pleased that you don't believe solvents damage ABS plastics -
you're the one that's going to come a cropper.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2017 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.