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Radio 2



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 8th 17, 05:12 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
JNugent[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 133
Default Radio 2

On 07/02/2017 10:56, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Mon, 6 Feb 2017 17:55:15 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

When I was student I worked in a tin box factory, shoveled sand in a waterworks
and sorted mail and parcels at Xmas. Music provided in the GPO made the sorting
shifts go faster. Music While You Work was provided because it was thought to
help productivity.


https://youtu.be/xLhUK23coA8

Memories!


The BBC was still playing this stuff in the 1960s, even after the
advent of the Beatles and Rolling Stones, as if the rock'nroll decade,
the 1950s, had never happened.


Indeed. It was the 1967 reorganisation, and the demise of the Light
Programme, which changed things.

Nowadays (and ever since 1967), the presenter is more important than the
content.

I liked it better when the content was the star. And that applied to
Luxembourg as well. It was not an improvement when the schedule changed
from the 15/30/60 minute sponsored slots to two and three hour sessions
with a "personality".

But for the likes of Radio Luxembourg
and the so-called "pirate" offshore stations, the public might never
have discovered that anything other than classical, light orchestral,
and wartime dance band music existed.


Well, popular music was always there on the Light, but it was just one
element of a generic station's output, as were news, comedy and one or
two of the lighter drama offerings (wasn't "Mrs Dale's Diary" originally
a Light Programme item?). You wouldn't expect BBC1 to be nothing but
comedy.

On the Light, though, popular music was featured in a way which was not
just the playing-out of records (though there were some programmes which
were just that). Semi-live programmes like "Easy Beat" and "Saturday
Club" were a combination of live versions of current singles by the
artistes concerned, live "cover" versions by resident musicians and
singers and even some reference back to the dance band days.





---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

  #22  
Old February 8th 17, 09:12 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 334
Default Radio 2

On Wed, 8 Feb 2017 18:12:51 +0000, JNugent
wrote:

On 07/02/2017 10:56, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Mon, 6 Feb 2017 17:55:15 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

When I was student I worked in a tin box factory, shoveled sand in a waterworks
and sorted mail and parcels at Xmas. Music provided in the GPO made the sorting
shifts go faster. Music While You Work was provided because it was thought to
help productivity.

https://youtu.be/xLhUK23coA8

Memories!


The BBC was still playing this stuff in the 1960s, even after the
advent of the Beatles and Rolling Stones, as if the rock'nroll decade,
the 1950s, had never happened.


Indeed. It was the 1967 reorganisation, and the demise of the Light
Programme, which changed things.

Nowadays (and ever since 1967), the presenter is more important than the
content.

I liked it better when the content was the star. And that applied to
Luxembourg as well. It was not an improvement when the schedule changed
from the 15/30/60 minute sponsored slots to two and three hour sessions
with a "personality".

But for the likes of Radio Luxembourg
and the so-called "pirate" offshore stations, the public might never
have discovered that anything other than classical, light orchestral,
and wartime dance band music existed.


Well, popular music was always there on the Light, but it was just one
element of a generic station's output, as were news, comedy and one or
two of the lighter drama offerings (wasn't "Mrs Dale's Diary" originally
a Light Programme item?). You wouldn't expect BBC1 to be nothing but
comedy.

On the Light, though, popular music was featured in a way which was not
just the playing-out of records (though there were some programmes which
were just that). Semi-live programmes like "Easy Beat" and "Saturday
Club" were a combination of live versions of current singles by the
artistes concerned, live "cover" versions by resident musicians and
singers and even some reference back to the dance band days.





---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com


There was a programme featuring Craig David on BBC radio the other
week, and in it he tells us how he is still hip, scratching & mixing,
down-with-the-kids and how he's been able to re-invent himself again
and again.

It was on whisper Radio Four.


--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #23  
Old February 8th 17, 09:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 334
Default Radio 2

On Wed, 8 Feb 2017 18:12:51 +0000, JNugent
wrote:

On 07/02/2017 10:56, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Mon, 6 Feb 2017 17:55:15 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

When I was student I worked in a tin box factory, shoveled sand in a waterworks
and sorted mail and parcels at Xmas. Music provided in the GPO made the sorting
shifts go faster. Music While You Work was provided because it was thought to
help productivity.

https://youtu.be/xLhUK23coA8

Memories!


The BBC was still playing this stuff in the 1960s, even after the
advent of the Beatles and Rolling Stones, as if the rock'nroll decade,
the 1950s, had never happened.


Indeed. It was the 1967 reorganisation, and the demise of the Light
Programme, which changed things.

Nowadays (and ever since 1967), the presenter is more important than the
content.

I liked it better when the content was the star. And that applied to
Luxembourg as well. It was not an improvement when the schedule changed
from the 15/30/60 minute sponsored slots to two and three hour sessions
with a "personality".

But for the likes of Radio Luxembourg
and the so-called "pirate" offshore stations, the public might never
have discovered that anything other than classical, light orchestral,
and wartime dance band music existed.


Well, popular music was always there on the Light, but it was just one
element of a generic station's output, as were news, comedy and one or
two of the lighter drama offerings (wasn't "Mrs Dale's Diary" originally
a Light Programme item?). You wouldn't expect BBC1 to be nothing but
comedy.

On the Light, though, popular music was featured in a way which was not
just the playing-out of records (though there were some programmes which
were just that). Semi-live programmes like "Easy Beat" and "Saturday
Club" were a combination of live versions of current singles by the
artistes concerned, live "cover" versions by resident musicians and
singers and even some reference back to the dance band days.





---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com



And Radio 1 didn't even have an exclusive FM allocation while Radio 3
with a tiny audience did.


--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  #24  
Old February 9th 17, 12:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
JNugent[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 133
Default Radio 2

On 08/02/2017 22:12, Graham. wrote:
On Wed, 8 Feb 2017 18:12:51 +0000, JNugent
wrote:

On 07/02/2017 10:56, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Mon, 6 Feb 2017 17:55:15 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

When I was student I worked in a tin box factory, shoveled sand in a waterworks
and sorted mail and parcels at Xmas. Music provided in the GPO made the sorting
shifts go faster. Music While You Work was provided because it was thought to
help productivity.

https://youtu.be/xLhUK23coA8

Memories!

The BBC was still playing this stuff in the 1960s, even after the
advent of the Beatles and Rolling Stones, as if the rock'nroll decade,
the 1950s, had never happened.


Indeed. It was the 1967 reorganisation, and the demise of the Light
Programme, which changed things.

Nowadays (and ever since 1967), the presenter is more important than the
content.

I liked it better when the content was the star. And that applied to
Luxembourg as well. It was not an improvement when the schedule changed
from the 15/30/60 minute sponsored slots to two and three hour sessions
with a "personality".

But for the likes of Radio Luxembourg
and the so-called "pirate" offshore stations, the public might never
have discovered that anything other than classical, light orchestral,
and wartime dance band music existed.


Well, popular music was always there on the Light, but it was just one
element of a generic station's output, as were news, comedy and one or
two of the lighter drama offerings (wasn't "Mrs Dale's Diary" originally
a Light Programme item?). You wouldn't expect BBC1 to be nothing but
comedy.

On the Light, though, popular music was featured in a way which was not
just the playing-out of records (though there were some programmes which
were just that). Semi-live programmes like "Easy Beat" and "Saturday
Club" were a combination of live versions of current singles by the
artistes concerned, live "cover" versions by resident musicians and
singers and even some reference back to the dance band days.





---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com


There was a programme featuring Craig David on BBC radio the other
week, and in it he tells us how he is still hip, scratching & mixing,
down-with-the-kids and how he's been able to re-invent himself again
and again.

It was on whisper Radio Four.


weary shake of the head

Please tell mne it was a programme about business (success and failure)
and not one about artistic endeavour.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

  #25  
Old February 9th 17, 09:29 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,906
Default Radio 2

On Wed, 8 Feb 2017 18:12:51 +0000, JNugent
wrote:

https://youtu.be/xLhUK23coA8

Memories!


The BBC was still playing this stuff in the 1960s, even after the
advent of the Beatles and Rolling Stones, as if the rock'nroll decade,
the 1950s, had never happened.


Indeed. It was the 1967 reorganisation, and the demise of the Light
Programme, which changed things.


And what was it that had prompted the change? I doubt very much that
the BBC would have decided all by themselves that what the nation
wanted was a channel that broadcast nothing but pop music. They might
still be using the needle-time restriction as an excuse even now if
they hadn't been given a massive kick up the backside by the so-called
"pirate" stations demonstrating what the public really wanted.

The pirate stations got round the needle-time restriction by simply
ignoring it, and the record companies complained that this was
damaging their business, but simultaneously paid for the helicopters
that took advance copies of their records out to the boats.

And the world of broadcasting changed, but not thanks to the BBC.

Rod.
  #26  
Old February 9th 17, 11:49 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 222
Default Radio 2

On 09/02/2017 12:07, Martin wrote:

EU officials said the BBC service would need to introduce a system that verifies
the country of residence of users, which services like Netflix and Amazon
already have."


I think the only way Netflix knows I'm a UK citizen, is because of my
credit card details.

Ah !



--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #27  
Old February 10th 17, 05:54 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John J Armstrong
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 71
Default Radio 2

On Thu, 09 Feb 2017 10:29:37 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

On Wed, 8 Feb 2017 18:12:51 +0000, JNugent
wrote:

https://youtu.be/xLhUK23coA8

Memories!

The BBC was still playing this stuff in the 1960s, even after the
advent of the Beatles and Rolling Stones, as if the rock'nroll decade,
the 1950s, had never happened.


Indeed. It was the 1967 reorganisation, and the demise of the Light
Programme, which changed things.


And what was it that had prompted the change? I doubt very much that
the BBC would have decided all by themselves that what the nation
wanted was a channel that broadcast nothing but pop music. They might
still be using the needle-time restriction as an excuse even now if
they hadn't been given a massive kick up the backside by the so-called
"pirate" stations demonstrating what the public really wanted.

The pirate stations got round the needle-time restriction by simply
ignoring it, and the record companies complained that this was
damaging their business, but simultaneously paid for the helicopters
that took advance copies of their records out to the boats.

And the world of broadcasting changed, but not thanks to the BBC.

Rod.


The Marine Broadcasting Offences Act 1967. Sir Anthony
Wedgwood-Benn's finest hour.

Possibly.
  #28  
Old February 10th 17, 10:58 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
James Heaton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 79
Default Radio 2


"JNugent" wrote in message
...
On 08/02/2017 22:12, Graham. wrote:
On Wed, 8 Feb 2017 18:12:51 +0000, JNugent
wrote:

On 07/02/2017 10:56, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Mon, 6 Feb 2017 17:55:15 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

When I was student I worked in a tin box factory, shoveled sand in a
waterworks
and sorted mail and parcels at Xmas. Music provided in the GPO made
the sorting
shifts go faster. Music While You Work was provided because it was
thought to
help productivity.

https://youtu.be/xLhUK23coA8

Memories!

The BBC was still playing this stuff in the 1960s, even after the
advent of the Beatles and Rolling Stones, as if the rock'nroll decade,
the 1950s, had never happened.

Indeed. It was the 1967 reorganisation, and the demise of the Light
Programme, which changed things.

Nowadays (and ever since 1967), the presenter is more important than the
content.

I liked it better when the content was the star. And that applied to
Luxembourg as well. It was not an improvement when the schedule changed
from the 15/30/60 minute sponsored slots to two and three hour sessions
with a "personality".

But for the likes of Radio Luxembourg
and the so-called "pirate" offshore stations, the public might never
have discovered that anything other than classical, light orchestral,
and wartime dance band music existed.

Well, popular music was always there on the Light, but it was just one
element of a generic station's output, as were news, comedy and one or
two of the lighter drama offerings (wasn't "Mrs Dale's Diary" originally
a Light Programme item?). You wouldn't expect BBC1 to be nothing but
comedy.

On the Light, though, popular music was featured in a way which was not
just the playing-out of records (though there were some programmes which
were just that). Semi-live programmes like "Easy Beat" and "Saturday
Club" were a combination of live versions of current singles by the
artistes concerned, live "cover" versions by resident musicians and
singers and even some reference back to the dance band days.





---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com


There was a programme featuring Craig David on BBC radio the other
week, and in it he tells us how he is still hip, scratching & mixing,
down-with-the-kids and how he's been able to re-invent himself again
and again.

It was on whisper Radio Four.


weary shake of the head

Please tell mne it was a programme about business (success and failure)
and not one about artistic endeavour.


I imagine it was Mastertapes, 2x half hour programmes.

1st one, John Wilson interviews the featured artist about making a
significant album.

2nd one, the audience question the same artist.

James


  #29  
Old February 10th 17, 06:15 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Scott[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,171
Default Radio 2

On Fri, 10 Feb 2017 18:27:19 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Fri, 10 Feb 2017 16:07:34 +0000, wrote:

On Thu, 09 Feb 2017 10:29:37 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:



The BBC was still playing this stuff in the 1960s,

Indeed. It was the 1967 reorganisation, and the demise of the Light
Programme, which changed things.


The pirate stations got round the needle-time restriction by simply
ignoring it, and the record companies complained that this was
damaging their business, but simultaneously paid for the helicopters
that took advance copies of their records out to the boats.


Not so sure about the Helicopter bit, the Tenders( usually the
Offshore 1) went out almost daily weather permitting .
https://vimeo.com/125143389

None of the vessels used for transmission had helipads and hovering
closely around a vessel festooned with guy wires attached to a 50
metre mast that unlike a land based one could wave around a bit isn't
something most helicopter pilots would like to do.


Radio Caroline was moored just outside the 3 mile limit near Southend. I was
with a group who sailed out to it in a charter boat at Easter in 1966. They
played Nancy Sinatra's Boots for us AFAIR.


Sailing there would be perfectly feasible (weather permitting) but
this does not mean you could get a helicopter in.
  #30  
Old February 10th 17, 09:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Scott[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,171
Default Radio 2

On Fri, 10 Feb 2017 23:11:55 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Fri, 10 Feb 2017 19:15:00 +0000, Scott wrote:

On Fri, 10 Feb 2017 18:27:19 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Fri, 10 Feb 2017 16:07:34 +0000, wrote:

On Thu, 09 Feb 2017 10:29:37 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:



The BBC was still playing this stuff in the 1960s,

Indeed. It was the 1967 reorganisation, and the demise of the Light
Programme, which changed things.

The pirate stations got round the needle-time restriction by simply
ignoring it, and the record companies complained that this was
damaging their business, but simultaneously paid for the helicopters
that took advance copies of their records out to the boats.

Not so sure about the Helicopter bit, the Tenders( usually the
Offshore 1) went out almost daily weather permitting .
https://vimeo.com/125143389

None of the vessels used for transmission had helipads and hovering
closely around a vessel festooned with guy wires attached to a 50
metre mast that unlike a land based one could wave around a bit isn't
something most helicopter pilots would like to do.

Radio Caroline was moored just outside the 3 mile limit near Southend. I was
with a group who sailed out to it in a charter boat at Easter in 1966. They
played Nancy Sinatra's Boots for us AFAIR.


Sailing there would be perfectly feasible (weather permitting) but
this does not mean you could get a helicopter in.


I wasn't suggesting it was.


By adding your comment to a sub-thread about helicopters I thought you
were commenting on ... helicopters. I visited Blackhill TV
transmitter in 1967 and got there by car.

 




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