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BBC1 Scheduling - Contempt for Viewers?



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 8th 17, 02:52 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
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Posts: 319
Default BBC1 Scheduling - Contempt for Viewers?



"Sam" wrote in message
news
On 07/02/2017 19:12, tim... wrote:


"Sam" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 07/02/2017 18:21, tim... wrote:


"Sam" wrote in message
o.uk...
On 07/02/2017 15:45, tim... wrote:


"Sam" wrote in message
o.uk...

In this case particularly (a series made up of self contained
stories),
I wouldn't get your 'pants in a twist. I'm sure it'll all work out
right
in the end. You'll see/record all 15 episodes eventually, even if
there's
a week or four's gap somewhere in the sequence.


Each episode, unless a two part one, contains a "self contained"
story
but there is also a back story.

only very very trivially

tim



In your opinion.

We are still talking about Father Brown, we haven't switched to
something else and I missed it?

OK then, what the **** is it?

It's not even like the supporting characters are the same each series.

Only Brown and the Housekeeper are the same. For the rest, we are now
on the third incarnation

And I don't recall seeing any behind the scenes relationships going on
between the main players :-)

tim



You obviously haven't seen the series.


I've seen them all


None of them a one off episode only appearance.


Eh?

tim



Re-phrase:

The characters listed appeared in more than one episode - contrary to your
statements:

"It's not even like the supporting characters are the same each series"


well I didn't say that they were different from episode to episode


and

"Only Brown and the Housekeeper are the same. For the rest, we are now
on the third incarnation"


which we are


  #22  
Old February 14th 17, 03:40 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 336
Default BBC1 Scheduling - Contempt for Viewers?

On Tue, 07 Feb 2017 19:13:21 +0000, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Tue, 7 Feb 2017 18:56:37 +0000, Sam wrote:

Each episode, unless a two part one, contains a "self contained"
story but there is also a back story.

only very very trivially

tim



In your opinion.

We are still talking about Father Brown, we haven't switched to
something else and I missed it?

OK then, what the **** is it?

It's not even like the supporting characters are the same each series.

Only Brown and the Housekeeper are the same. For the rest, we are now
on the third incarnation

And I don't recall seeing any behind the scenes relationships going on
between the main players :-)

tim



You obviously haven't seen the series.

Cast Examples - thanks to IMDB:

Nancy Carroll as Lady Felicia in over 40 episodes.

Hugo Speer as Inspector Valentine in 11 episodes

Alex Price as Sid Carter in 42 episodes.

None of them a one off episode only appearanced.


I've seen some of them, but have yet to see anything vaguely reminiscent
of anything written by G K Chesterton. They're quite reasonable
afternoon dramas in their own right, anodyne and not too mentally
taxing, but to describe them as "based on" the Father Brown stories is
wildly imaginative as absolutely the only thing in common with the
original is the central character's name. He's not really the same
character either. Nothing else about these programmes seems to have
anything to do with any of the original stories.

I think if you see mention of the phrase, "Based upon..." in the credits
of a BBC drama series, they're generally being economic with the truth by
leaving out the vital adverb, "Loosely" at the beginning of that phrase.
I think you can safely translate any such phrases as "Based upon" to read
"Loosely based upon" for a more accurate description.

--
Johnny B Good
  #23  
Old February 14th 17, 04:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 336
Default BBC1 Scheduling - Contempt for Viewers?

On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 10:02:40 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 04:40:28 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

On Tue, 07 Feb 2017 19:13:21 +0000, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Tue, 7 Feb 2017 18:56:37 +0000, Sam wrote:

Each episode, unless a two part one, contains a "self contained"
story but there is also a back story.

only very very trivially

tim



In your opinion.

We are still talking about Father Brown, we haven't switched to
something else and I missed it?

OK then, what the **** is it?

It's not even like the supporting characters are the same each
series.

Only Brown and the Housekeeper are the same. For the rest, we are
now on the third incarnation

And I don't recall seeing any behind the scenes relationships going
on between the main players :-)

tim



You obviously haven't seen the series.

Cast Examples - thanks to IMDB:

Nancy Carroll as Lady Felicia in over 40 episodes.

Hugo Speer as Inspector Valentine in 11 episodes

Alex Price as Sid Carter in 42 episodes.

None of them a one off episode only appearanced.

I've seen some of them, but have yet to see anything vaguely
reminiscent of anything written by G K Chesterton. They're quite
reasonable afternoon dramas in their own right, anodyne and not too
mentally taxing, but to describe them as "based on" the Father Brown
stories is wildly imaginative as absolutely the only thing in common
with the original is the central character's name. He's not really the
same character either. Nothing else about these programmes seems to
have anything to do with any of the original stories.

I think if you see mention of the phrase, "Based upon..." in the
credits
of a BBC drama series, they're generally being economic with the truth
by leaving out the vital adverb, "Loosely" at the beginning of that
phrase. I think you can safely translate any such phrases as "Based
upon" to read "Loosely based upon" for a more accurate description.


They often replace a good ending with a poor one, because they are
hoping to make a second series.


I presume you're referring to a series finale ending rather than
individual episode endings.

BTW, when I was admiring the arrival of my post onto the news server (as
it made its debut to the wider usenet community, as it were), it occurred
to me that I should also have included the need to make use of the
descriptive, "very" in front of the "loosely based upon" phrase so often
required by many such adaptations in the "Father Brown" genre.

I suppose the commissioning company are worried that such "Brutal
Honesty" might put off viewers after such a protracted period of use of
such 'economy of phrasing' rather than be admired for their sudden
honesty. Perhaps a more accurate alternative might be to use the phrase,
"In the style of" which conveys pretty much the same message but using a
lower letter count. :-)

--
Johnny B Good
  #24  
Old February 14th 17, 05:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 1,906
Default BBC1 Scheduling - Contempt for Viewers?

On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 17:45:27 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 10:02:40 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 04:40:28 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

On Tue, 07 Feb 2017 19:13:21 +0000, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Tue, 7 Feb 2017 18:56:37 +0000, Sam wrote:

Each episode, unless a two part one, contains a "self contained"
story but there is also a back story.

only very very trivially

tim



In your opinion.

We are still talking about Father Brown, we haven't switched to
something else and I missed it?

OK then, what the **** is it?

It's not even like the supporting characters are the same each
series.

Only Brown and the Housekeeper are the same. For the rest, we are
now on the third incarnation

And I don't recall seeing any behind the scenes relationships going
on between the main players :-)

tim



You obviously haven't seen the series.

Cast Examples - thanks to IMDB:

Nancy Carroll as Lady Felicia in over 40 episodes.

Hugo Speer as Inspector Valentine in 11 episodes

Alex Price as Sid Carter in 42 episodes.

None of them a one off episode only appearanced.

I've seen some of them, but have yet to see anything vaguely
reminiscent of anything written by G K Chesterton. They're quite
reasonable afternoon dramas in their own right, anodyne and not too
mentally taxing, but to describe them as "based on" the Father Brown
stories is wildly imaginative as absolutely the only thing in common
with the original is the central character's name. He's not really the
same character either. Nothing else about these programmes seems to
have anything to do with any of the original stories.

I think if you see mention of the phrase, "Based upon..." in the
credits
of a BBC drama series, they're generally being economic with the truth
by leaving out the vital adverb, "Loosely" at the beginning of that
phrase. I think you can safely translate any such phrases as "Based
upon" to read "Loosely based upon" for a more accurate description.


They often replace a good ending with a poor one, because they are
hoping to make a second series.


I presume you're referring to a series finale ending rather than
individual episode endings.

BTW, when I was admiring the arrival of my post onto the news server (as
it made its debut to the wider usenet community, as it were), it occurred
to me that I should also have included the need to make use of the
descriptive, "very" in front of the "loosely based upon" phrase so often
required by many such adaptations in the "Father Brown" genre.

I suppose the commissioning company are worried that such "Brutal
Honesty" might put off viewers after such a protracted period of use of
such 'economy of phrasing' rather than be admired for their sudden
honesty. Perhaps a more accurate alternative might be to use the phrase,
"In the style of" which conveys pretty much the same message but using a
lower letter count. :-)

--
Johnny B Good


I don't think the BBC afternoon Father Brown series is "in the style
of" anything other than BBC afternoon drama. They're quite enjoyable
programmes on their own terms, but if you've read a few of the G K
Chesterton stories you'll see no similarities at all. They might as
well call the central character Father Smith or Father Bloggs without
the dramatic connection being any less tenuous.

It's a series of stories about a priest who is rooted in a village
community, not the one who crops up in any location as in Chesterton's
stories. Everybody knows him and recognises him, and he's certainly
not the "little priest" (as described in the original stories) whose
very insignificance enables him to move around unnoticed and gain
access to places and people which gives him an advantage that others
may not have when solving crimes. And he lives in the 1960s, not the
1920s and earlier. (Perhaps it's easier to get the props). His name's
the same though. It's Brown. That seems to be about all.

I can't help thinking that if you're going to show a TV drama and
claim that it's based on something, it ought to have something more in
common with the original material than just somebody's name. There's
nothing wrong with adapting something, but if you're going to change
the substance of it beyond all recognition, it would be more honest to
call it something else.

Rod.
  #25  
Old February 14th 17, 05:44 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 1,906
Default BBC1 Scheduling - Contempt for Viewers?

On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 18:32:31 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

They might as
well call the central character Father Smith or Father Bloggs without
the dramatic connection being any less tenuous.


I think I meant "more tenuous". Too many negatives.

Rod.
  #26  
Old February 14th 17, 10:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 336
Default BBC1 Scheduling - Contempt for Viewers?

On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 18:44:17 +0000, Roderick Stewart wrote:

On Tue, 14 Feb 2017 18:32:31 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

They might as well call the central character Father Smith or Father
Bloggs without the dramatic connection being any less tenuous.


I think I meant "more tenuous". Too many negatives.


So, in this case at least, the phrase "very loosley based upon" 'nails
it' then. :-)

--
Johnny B Good
 




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