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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Stop the midwife



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 1st 17, 10:11 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Terry Casey[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 694
Default Stop the midwife

In article ,
says...

On Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:50:39 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

She may not have seen series mind as she has lived
both in the UK and Belgium since then moving back and forth between
countries and husbands.


Not a problem as the vast majority of Belgian homes* have
cable TV which carries BBC1 & BBC2. Plus, of course, it may
have been shown on one of the Dutch/Belgian channels in
English with Dutch/Flemish subtitles.

The French and Walloon channels insist on programes being
dubbed into French and I'm sure I recall reading that 'Allo,
'Allow was dubbed for TV there because the article explained
how the dialogue had been cleverly changed so that the
humour of the original wasn't lost.

* It is rare to see many TV aerials except, possibly, in the
countryside.

When I first started visiting Belgium in the early 70s,
virtually every roof on the coast carried a variety of Band
I, Band III and UHF aerials pointing every which way -
inland for the local and Walloon channels, North East
towards the Netherlands, South to France and, of course,
West - towards the Dover transmitter. The Dover signal
didn't penetrate far beyond the coast so systems inland
omitted the Dover aerial but were otherwise the same. Some
of the more sophisticated systems employed multi-bsand
aerials with rotators. I shudder to think what the insurance
must have cost for some of these aluminium 'forests', guyed
to all four corners of the buildings!

And then the cable arrived.

Within a year or so, every one of these magnificent arrays
had disappeared. One selling point for cable was that
expensive multi-standard TVs were no longer required as
conversion to a single standard was done at the Headend, so
subscibers saved more than the first year's cost if they
bought a new TV and the reduction in insurance costs would
have resulted in the rapid removal of all the roof mounted
metalwork.

--

Terry
  #24  
Old February 1st 17, 11:12 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 362
Default Stop the midwife

On Wed, 1 Feb 2017 11:11:36 -0000, Terry Casey
wrote:

In article ,
says...

On Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:50:39 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

She may not have seen series mind as she has lived
both in the UK and Belgium since then moving back and forth between
countries and husbands.


Not a problem as the vast majority of Belgian homes* have
cable TV which carries BBC1 & BBC2. Plus, of course, it may
have been shown on one of the Dutch/Belgian channels in
English with Dutch/Flemish subtitles.

The French and Walloon channels insist on programes being
dubbed into French and I'm sure I recall reading that 'Allo,
'Allow was dubbed for TV there because the article explained
how the dialogue had been cleverly changed so that the
humour of the original wasn't lost.


How on earth would you transalate
"Good moaning, I was just ****ing and I heard a shat"
into French?

When Fawlty Towers was shown in Spain, Manuel the waiter from
Barceona, became an Italian from Paolo.


--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #25  
Old February 1st 17, 11:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 356
Default Stop the midwife



"Graham." wrote in message
news
On Wed, 1 Feb 2017 11:11:36 -0000, Terry Casey
wrote:

In article ,
says...

On Tue, 31 Jan 2017 13:50:39 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

She may not have seen series mind as she has lived
both in the UK and Belgium since then moving back and forth between
countries and husbands.


Not a problem as the vast majority of Belgian homes* have
cable TV which carries BBC1 & BBC2. Plus, of course, it may
have been shown on one of the Dutch/Belgian channels in
English with Dutch/Flemish subtitles.

The French and Walloon channels insist on programes being
dubbed into French and I'm sure I recall reading that 'Allo,
'Allow was dubbed for TV there because the article explained
how the dialogue had been cleverly changed so that the
humour of the original wasn't lost.


How on earth would you transalate
"Good moaning, I was just ****ing and I heard a shat"
into French?

When Fawlty Towers was shown in Spain, Manuel the waiter from
Barceona, became an Italian from Paolo.


and who did Paolo sire in order to begat Manuel?

tim





  #26  
Old February 1st 17, 11:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 999
Default Stop the midwife

"Terry Casey" wrote in message
...
In article ,
says...

On Tue, 31 Jan 2017 09:06:37 -0000, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

So when were two-tone horns introduced? when did they stop using
bells, what did they use in-between?


Assuming that they were introduced at the same time as the
blue lights, mid 1962 (at least, with the Essex County
Constabulary - other forces might differ).


I hadn't realised that blue lights came later than bells. I'll have to find
a few cinema films from the 1950s and 60s, and look to see whether police
black Wolseleys, sounding their bells, had blue flashing lights on them.
(OK, on black and white films, I'll just be able to say that they had
flashing lights, colour unknown!). I suppose in those days there was usually
less traffic so there wasn't the need to show where the emergency vehicle
was with blue lights as it approached because it was more easily seen as it
came up behind you and overtook you without (as often)having to wait for a
gap in the oncoming traffic.

I heard a two-tone horn the other day, which surprised me: I'd have thought
that all emergency vehicles on the road today would be new enough to be
fitted with warbling rising/falling pitch sirens rather than two-tone horns.

I do wonder about the sanity of the person who thought that *red* flashing
lights on a police car (in addition to the blue ones) were a good idea,
given that red flashing means everyone (including emergency vehicles) stop
here and do not pass - as used on level crossings and swing bridges, whereas
police cars use them when stationary at the side of the road having stopped
someone or at the site of an accident, when the meaning is the same as the
blue lights - take care as you are passing and maybe pass slowly, but no
need to stop. It tends to weaken the meaning of red lights at level
crossings.

  #29  
Old February 1st 17, 01:11 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Terry Casey[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 694
Default Stop the midwife

In article ,
says...

On Wed, 1 Feb 2017 11:11:36 -0000, Terry Casey
wrote:


The French and Walloon channels insist on programes being
dubbed into French and I'm sure I recall reading that 'Allo,
'Allow was dubbed for TV there because the article explained
how the dialogue had been cleverly changed so that the
humour of the original wasn't lost.


How on earth would you transalate
"Good moaning, I was just ****ing and I heard a shat"
into French?


As I said, the dialogue was changed as a direct translation
- or should that be mispronunciation? - into French wouldn't
have worked.

Suitably mangled French would have been substituted instead.

One character spoke French with a bad English accent, for
example.

Aparently it was a headache for the Dutch who subtitle all
non-Dutch programming.

I know that a lot of Dutch/Flemish ignore subtitles because
their English is good enough to follow the original sound
track but they must have found it very puzzling in this case
because, if there was something they couldn't understand,
the subtitles almost certainly said something different!

A rather deep discussion can be found he

http://tinyurl.com/zckp93x

which includes references to the Dutch subtitling.

If your French is up to it, you could try this for yourself:

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xad...-allo-version-
francaise-episode_fun

or http://tinyurl.com/z2j4lxn

Surprisingly, 'Allo 'Allo made it to German TV!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7368058.stm

--

Terry
 




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