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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

dialogue on some programmes



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 20th 17, 09:00 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,570
Default dialogue on some programmes

Now I'm not an Eastenders view/listener, but had it running while waiting
for Spy in the wild. last night. The dialogue was from OK to mumble aand
background noise, while the AD track was always very loud. Is it always this
way?
I'd have thought that by now having been running so long the sound
engineers could have done better?
In case you are wondering about the perverse reason for a blind person
wanting to listen to a program dedicated to hidden cameras whos output he
cannot see, well it does have very good Audio description, and was enjoyable
in that way.
The next program, Death in Paradise needed more AD. It was Ok for things
like people moving silently, and who was present and all that, but when
locations switched you often had to listen for the background sounds to
change to indicate this.
I don't like over described stuff, but also too little does leave you a bit
confused sometimes.

Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!


  #2  
Old January 20th 17, 10:01 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 852
Default dialogue on some programmes

"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Now I'm not an Eastenders view/listener, but had it running while waiting for Spy
in the wild. last night. The dialogue was from OK to mumble aand background noise,
while the AD track was always very loud. Is it always this way?


I don't know, but have a related query. When I was away recently in a hotel in
Lanzarote, I noticed that AD was activated on EastEnders and that the remote, which
controlled everything else, could not turn it off even though I found the menu item
about it and tried to mute it. I don't know how the hotel acquires its signal but a
couple of years ago they weren't able to receive a satellite signal when it moved to
a satellite with a smaller footprint.

Any ideas? Is there a channel that broadcasts or redistributes a signal with
embedded AD perhaps?

  #3  
Old January 20th 17, 10:16 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,024
Default dialogue on some programmes

"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Now I'm not an Eastenders view/listener, but had it running while waiting
for Spy in the wild. last night. The dialogue was from OK to mumble aand
background noise, while the AD track was always very loud. Is it always
this way?
I'd have thought that by now having been running so long the sound
engineers could have done better?
In case you are wondering about the perverse reason for a blind person
wanting to listen to a program dedicated to hidden cameras whos output he
cannot see, well it does have very good Audio description, and was
enjoyable in that way.


Spy in the Wild was in parts very intriguing and in parts utterly hilarious.
Some of the animatronic model animals were more realistic than others. Some
looked like a taxidermist's failures. They generally moved rather jerkily.
But they seemed to convince the squirrels, pigs, orang utans etc that one of
their brethren was nearby. The two laugh-out-loud scenes featured a model
pig waddling very stiffly and rocking from side to side as it walked along a
stream bed (I kept thinking "I hope it doesn't fall over"), and a model
orang utan sitting on a veranda sawing very unconvincingly at a branch.
However the model orang utan must have been convincing because a real orang
utan was sitting beside the model, and it soon learned to copy the model and
learned to saw the branch, though it couldn't quite get the hang of sawing
right through and gave up half way - I could just imagine my dad saying to
me "frame yourself, lad" (ie "stop messing about and do it properly, like I
showed you").

The next program, Death in Paradise needed more AD. It was Ok for things
like people moving silently, and who was present and all that, but when
locations switched you often had to listen for the background sounds to
change to indicate this.
I don't like over described stuff, but also too little does leave you a
bit confused sometimes.


I've not listened to AD much, because I don't have any software that will
play the AD track at the same time as the dialogue track, to judge how they
interleave. But like you, I'd expect that the one thing that AD would tell
you is "the scene has now switched to X's living room". It must be a fine
line between saying too little versus revealing important plot points too
soon. Whereas a sighted person would see subtle clues about the living room
and would gradually realise whose house it was, as the director gradually
unfolds the storyline, the AD track can't be quite as subtle and either has
to describe a few key features and let you work out that you've already been
shown the room earlier in the film, by the fact that the description is the
same, or else it just comes straight out and says "this is X's house". If I
can get VLC or some similar software to combine the two audio tracks, I'll
have to try "watching" a drama with no picture, just relying on AD and
dialogue to work out what's happening. I imagine it will be a humbling
experience...

  #4  
Old January 20th 17, 01:07 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
pinnerite
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 71
Default dialogue on some programmes

Brian Gaff wrote:

Now I'm not an Eastenders view/listener, but had it running while waiting
for Spy in the wild. last night. The dialogue was from OK to mumble aand
background noise, while the AD track was always very loud. Is it always
this way?
I'd have thought that by now having been running so long the sound
engineers could have done better?
In case you are wondering about the perverse reason for a blind person
wanting to listen to a program dedicated to hidden cameras whos output he
cannot see, well it does have very good Audio description, and was
enjoyable in that way.
The next program, Death in Paradise needed more AD. It was Ok for things
like people moving silently, and who was present and all that, but when
locations switched you often had to listen for the background sounds to
change to indicate this.
I don't like over described stuff, but also too little does leave you a
bit
confused sometimes.

Brian


I found over last few years that when I sat watching our on-the-wall TV, I
was increasingly raising the volume to gain clarity. My wife needed it even
higher. We decided to have our hearing tested. We now both have hearing aids
that have definitely solved the problem. They are not perfect but the high
frequencies have been restored.

Just a thought.

Alan

--
Mageia 5.1 for x86_64, Kernel:4.4.39-desktop-2.mga5
KDE version 4.14.5 on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition.

  #5  
Old January 20th 17, 02:11 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,570
Default dialogue on some programmes

No but the I player has two streams, one with embedded ad and one without.
I suspect the button might just not have been working on your remote
perhaps?

A lot of people actually like the AD as busy people buzzing about the house
while its on can stay up to date on the action while doing other things.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Norman Wells" wrote in message
...
"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Now I'm not an Eastenders view/listener, but had it running while waiting
for Spy in the wild. last night. The dialogue was from OK to mumble aand
background noise, while the AD track was always very loud. Is it always
this way?


I don't know, but have a related query. When I was away recently in a
hotel in Lanzarote, I noticed that AD was activated on EastEnders and that
the remote, which controlled everything else, could not turn it off even
though I found the menu item about it and tried to mute it. I don't know
how the hotel acquires its signal but a couple of years ago they weren't
able to receive a satellite signal when it moved to a satellite with a
smaller footprint.

Any ideas? Is there a channel that broadcasts or redistributes a signal
with embedded AD perhaps?



  #6  
Old January 20th 17, 02:15 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,570
Default dialogue on some programmes

Its actually not that bad you know. Many programs like dramas don't need
pictures much unless they are special effect fests or take place in
breathtaking scenery of course.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"NY" wrote in message
o.uk...
"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
Now I'm not an Eastenders view/listener, but had it running while waiting
for Spy in the wild. last night. The dialogue was from OK to mumble aand
background noise, while the AD track was always very loud. Is it always
this way?
I'd have thought that by now having been running so long the sound
engineers could have done better?
In case you are wondering about the perverse reason for a blind person
wanting to listen to a program dedicated to hidden cameras whos output
he cannot see, well it does have very good Audio description, and was
enjoyable in that way.


Spy in the Wild was in parts very intriguing and in parts utterly
hilarious. Some of the animatronic model animals were more realistic than
others. Some looked like a taxidermist's failures. They generally moved
rather jerkily. But they seemed to convince the squirrels, pigs, orang
utans etc that one of their brethren was nearby. The two laugh-out-loud
scenes featured a model pig waddling very stiffly and rocking from side to
side as it walked along a stream bed (I kept thinking "I hope it doesn't
fall over"), and a model orang utan sitting on a veranda sawing very
unconvincingly at a branch. However the model orang utan must have been
convincing because a real orang utan was sitting beside the model, and it
soon learned to copy the model and learned to saw the branch, though it
couldn't quite get the hang of sawing right through and gave up half way -
I could just imagine my dad saying to me "frame yourself, lad" (ie "stop
messing about and do it properly, like I showed you").

The next program, Death in Paradise needed more AD. It was Ok for things
like people moving silently, and who was present and all that, but when
locations switched you often had to listen for the background sounds to
change to indicate this.
I don't like over described stuff, but also too little does leave you a
bit confused sometimes.


I've not listened to AD much, because I don't have any software that will
play the AD track at the same time as the dialogue track, to judge how
they interleave. But like you, I'd expect that the one thing that AD would
tell you is "the scene has now switched to X's living room". It must be a
fine line between saying too little versus revealing important plot points
too soon. Whereas a sighted person would see subtle clues about the living
room and would gradually realise whose house it was, as the director
gradually unfolds the storyline, the AD track can't be quite as subtle and
either has to describe a few key features and let you work out that you've
already been shown the room earlier in the film, by the fact that the
description is the same, or else it just comes straight out and says "this
is X's house". If I can get VLC or some similar software to combine the
two audio tracks, I'll have to try "watching" a drama with no picture,
just relying on AD and dialogue to work out what's happening. I imagine it
will be a humbling experience...



  #7  
Old January 20th 17, 02:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,570
Default dialogue on some programmes

Yes I know, but its not the hf that is the issue its just the general level.
Of course you can turn the ad down against the rest, but each show seems to
have a different level aas well.
I think its down to how much compression you use. In something like
Eastenders its not that much, but American drama series seem to use more
bringing up quiietly spoken people to that of the louder ones.

Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Pinnerite" wrote in message
news
Brian Gaff wrote:

Now I'm not an Eastenders view/listener, but had it running while waiting
for Spy in the wild. last night. The dialogue was from OK to mumble aand
background noise, while the AD track was always very loud. Is it always
this way?
I'd have thought that by now having been running so long the sound
engineers could have done better?
In case you are wondering about the perverse reason for a blind person
wanting to listen to a program dedicated to hidden cameras whos output
he
cannot see, well it does have very good Audio description, and was
enjoyable in that way.
The next program, Death in Paradise needed more AD. It was Ok for things
like people moving silently, and who was present and all that, but when
locations switched you often had to listen for the background sounds to
change to indicate this.
I don't like over described stuff, but also too little does leave you a
bit
confused sometimes.

Brian


I found over last few years that when I sat watching our on-the-wall TV, I
was increasingly raising the volume to gain clarity. My wife needed it
even
higher. We decided to have our hearing tested. We now both have hearing
aids
that have definitely solved the problem. They are not perfect but the high
frequencies have been restored.

Just a thought.

Alan

--
Mageia 5.1 for x86_64, Kernel:4.4.39-desktop-2.mga5
KDE version 4.14.5 on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition.



  #8  
Old January 21st 17, 08:11 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 852
Default dialogue on some programmes

"Martin" wrote in message
...

It used to be part of an extra package of channels, but it seems to be one
price gets most channels now, other than film and sport channels. I wouldn't
pay a penny to watch it separately. We have UK TV via Freesat as well as BBC on
the cable. We only keep the cable for my wife.


Is the other end tied to the table leg?

 




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