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SpaceX’s Falcon 9 Launch 5:54:39 pm tonight



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 14th 17, 08:43 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Adrian Caspersz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 249
Default SpaceX’s Falcon 9 Launch 5:54:39 pm tonight

Flinging more things into space, and ...

http://www.spacex.com/sites/spacex/f..._press_kit.pdf

"following stage separation, the first stage of Falcon 9 will attempt
a landing on the 'Just Read the Instructions' droneship that will be
stationed in the Pacific Ocean"

Webcast is live 20 minutes before launch.

http://www.spacex.com/webcast

--
Adrian C
  #2  
Old January 14th 17, 05:04 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 365
Default SpaceXs Falcon 9 Launch 5:54:39 pm tonight

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 09:43:17 +0000, Adrian Caspersz
wrote:

Flinging more things into space, and ...

http://www.spacex.com/sites/spacex/f..._press_kit.pdf

"following stage separation, the first stage of Falcon 9 will attempt
a landing on the 'Just Read the Instructions' droneship that will be
stationed in the Pacific Ocean"

Webcast is live 20 minutes before launch.

http://www.spacex.com/webcast


Absolutely fantastic!


--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #3  
Old January 15th 17, 09:20 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,506
Default SpaceX's Falcon 9 Launch 5:54:39 pm tonight

Erm, well obviously I only listened to the webcast missing out on the
visuals. The saturn v1 had only just enough thrust to get everything off in
one go. Many people at Nasa say that if doing this today it could probably
be done in two or three launches instead with a better power to weight
ratio.

Fanfare for the Common man was used I seem to recall when promoting a
shuttle launch much later on. Sadly this was the first and last citizen in
space launch in86 which when it was launched killed all7 on board due to a
frozen O ring cracking in the solid booster join near the bottom bracket due
to an unusualy hard frost at the cape thj the night before.

I don't think they ever used it again.


Was not that the one when John Denver was going to go but was ruled out due
to undisclosed medical issues when he was being tested for suitablity.
OK he was a bit unhinged mentally, but many creative folk seem to have a
bit of that.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Chris Hogg" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 01:55:22 +0000, Graham.
wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 21:43:37 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:33:58 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:


Agreed, particularly getting the first stage back onto the barge. But
it takes a lot to better the Saturn 5 moon-shot lift-offs.

You mean thrust wise?

Just for sheer spectacle, which I suppose equates to thrust, Saturn-5
being somewhat larger than the Falcon-9 currently used by Spacex.
Especially when introduced by some mind-blowing music, but at this
distance in time I can't remember if it was Copeland or Strauss.
Copeland, I think; Strauss was used by Kubrick.

The Spacex launch brought the first stage back and put 10 satellites in
LEO.
That also takes some doing :-)

Whether they will ever reuse the returned first stages in launches is
another
question :-)


Strangely, I was thinking about this on Friday.
BBC used "Also sprach Zarathustra"
ITV used a piece called "Footprints on the Moon", odd that I remember
the title, but not the tune. It's on youtube. The Johnny Harris
Orchestra.


Kubrick certainly used Zarathustra for his introductory music for
'2001: A Space Odyssey'. But who, if anyone, used Copeland's 'Fanfare
for the Common Man' as theme music for their moon-shot coverage? Or am
I misremembering it completely?

--

Chris



  #4  
Old January 15th 17, 11:09 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,966
Default SpaceXs Falcon 9 Launch 5:54:39 pm tonight

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 08:23:10 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

Kubrick certainly used Zarathustra for his introductory music for
'2001: A Space Odyssey'. But who, if anyone, used Copeland's 'Fanfare
for the Common Man' as theme music for their moon-shot coverage? Or am
I misremembering it completely?


I recall the BBC using the opening chords for some of their coverage
of the moonshot, or perhaps a contemporary documentary about to it.

Rod.
  #5  
Old January 15th 17, 12:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,186
Default SpaceX’s Falcon 9 L

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 10:37:57 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 22:03:25 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 21:43:37 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:33:58 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:24:15 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 19:06:05 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 18:04:57 +0000, Graham.
wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 09:43:17 +0000, Adrian Caspersz
wrote:

Flinging more things into space, and ...

http://www.spacex.com/sites/spacex/f..._press_kit.pdf

"following stage separation, the first stage of Falcon 9 will attempt
a landing on the 'Just Read the Instructions' droneship that will be
stationed in the Pacific Ocean"

Webcast is live 20 minutes before launch.

http://www.spacex.com/webcast

Absolutely fantastic!

Agreed, particularly getting the first stage back onto the barge. But
it takes a lot to better the Saturn 5 moon-shot lift-offs.

You mean thrust wise?

Just for sheer spectacle, which I suppose equates to thrust, Saturn-5
being somewhat larger than the Falcon-9 currently used by Spacex.
Especially when introduced by some mind-blowing music, but at this
distance in time I can't remember if it was Copeland or Strauss.
Copeland, I think; Strauss was used by Kubrick.

The Spacex launch brought the first stage back and put 10 satellites in LEO.


Gosh, all that way, and so quickly http://tinyurl.com/zfa9php :-)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_Earth_orbit :-P


The existing Iridium satellites are "at a height of approximately 485 mi
(781 km)"
From:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iridiu..._constellation

That height is less than the straight-line distance between the
extremities of Great Britain, Land's End and John o' Groats, which is
"603 miles (970 km)".
From:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land's_End_to_John_o'_Groats

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #7  
Old January 15th 17, 02:35 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 365
Default SpaceXs Falcon 9 Launch 5:54:39 pm tonight

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 13:41:54 +0000, Peter Duncanson
wrote:

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 10:37:57 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 22:03:25 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 21:43:37 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:33:58 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:24:15 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 19:06:05 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 18:04:57 +0000, Graham.
wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 09:43:17 +0000, Adrian Caspersz
wrote:

Flinging more things into space, and ...

http://www.spacex.com/sites/spacex/f..._press_kit.pdf

"following stage separation, the first stage of Falcon 9 will attempt
a landing on the 'Just Read the Instructions' droneship that will be
stationed in the Pacific Ocean"

Webcast is live 20 minutes before launch.

http://www.spacex.com/webcast

Absolutely fantastic!

Agreed, particularly getting the first stage back onto the barge. But
it takes a lot to better the Saturn 5 moon-shot lift-offs.

You mean thrust wise?

Just for sheer spectacle, which I suppose equates to thrust, Saturn-5
being somewhat larger than the Falcon-9 currently used by Spacex.
Especially when introduced by some mind-blowing music, but at this
distance in time I can't remember if it was Copeland or Strauss.
Copeland, I think; Strauss was used by Kubrick.

The Spacex launch brought the first stage back and put 10 satellites in LEO.

Gosh, all that way, and so quickly http://tinyurl.com/zfa9php :-)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_Earth_orbit :-P


The existing Iridium satellites are "at a height of approximately 485 mi
(781 km)"
From:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iridiu..._constellation

That height is less than the straight-line distance between the
extremities of Great Britain, Land's End and John o' Groats, which is
"603 miles (970 km)".
From:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land's_End_to_John_o'_Groats



And yet they couldn't get real-time telemetry back to Mission Control
during the satellite deployments.
They said they only expected to lose it during the tenth deployment
(perhaps it occurred over the N or S pole). Did they announce what
went wrong?



--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #8  
Old January 15th 17, 02:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 365
Default SpaceXs Falcon 9 Launch 5:54:39 pm tonight

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 12:09:59 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 08:23:10 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

Kubrick certainly used Zarathustra for his introductory music for
'2001: A Space Odyssey'. But who, if anyone, used Copeland's 'Fanfare
for the Common Man' as theme music for their moon-shot coverage? Or am
I misremembering it completely?


I recall the BBC using the opening chords for some of their coverage
of the moonshot, or perhaps a contemporary documentary about to it.

Rod.




Apollo Soyuz - "Fanfare for the Common Man" was used by the BBC as the
signature tune for its programmes covering the Apollo Soyuz linkup
mission in the mid 1970s

http://www.mfiles.co.uk/composers/Aaron-Copland.htm


--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #9  
Old January 15th 17, 03:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,186
Default SpaceX’s Falcon 9 L

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 15:21 +0000 (GMT Standard Time),
(Paul Cummins) wrote:

In article ,

(Chris Hogg) wrote:

I always think that when journalists say 'it's visible from space'


Satellites in psace do the google Earth, which can resolve images to the
centimetric range.


I don't think so. Google uses relatively low-flying aircraft to get
close-up images for Google Earth.

https://www.quora.com/How-does-Googl...for-their-maps

Austin Froude
Written Apr 8, 2016

Google get its aerial imageries in several ways. In recent years it
has attracted a lot of attention for its vehicle-mounted camera. But
it only serves the purpose of taking images for street view
features. The aerial view shots of the Google map comes from the
satellite images and airplane cameras. Most of the city images of
the Google map come from aerial photography through cameras in
airplanes that fly over the area at between 800 and 1500 feet.

I've seen the same information in several different places.

Prety much everything is now "visible from space" as a result.


--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #10  
Old January 15th 17, 04:09 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,186
Default SpaceX’s Falcon 9 L

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 15:35:49 +0000, Graham.
wrote:

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 13:41:54 +0000, Peter Duncanson
wrote:

On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 10:37:57 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 22:03:25 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 21:43:37 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:33:58 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 20:24:15 +0100, Martin wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 19:06:05 +0000, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 18:04:57 +0000, Graham.
wrote:

On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 09:43:17 +0000, Adrian Caspersz
wrote:

Flinging more things into space, and ...

http://www.spacex.com/sites/spacex/f..._press_kit.pdf

"following stage separation, the first stage of Falcon 9 will attempt
a landing on the 'Just Read the Instructions' droneship that will be
stationed in the Pacific Ocean"

Webcast is live 20 minutes before launch.

http://www.spacex.com/webcast

Absolutely fantastic!

Agreed, particularly getting the first stage back onto the barge. But
it takes a lot to better the Saturn 5 moon-shot lift-offs.

You mean thrust wise?

Just for sheer spectacle, which I suppose equates to thrust, Saturn-5
being somewhat larger than the Falcon-9 currently used by Spacex.
Especially when introduced by some mind-blowing music, but at this
distance in time I can't remember if it was Copeland or Strauss.
Copeland, I think; Strauss was used by Kubrick.

The Spacex launch brought the first stage back and put 10 satellites in LEO.

Gosh, all that way, and so quickly http://tinyurl.com/zfa9php :-)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_Earth_orbit :-P


The existing Iridium satellites are "at a height of approximately 485 mi
(781 km)"
From:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iridiu..._constellation

That height is less than the straight-line distance between the
extremities of Great Britain, Land's End and John o' Groats, which is
"603 miles (970 km)".
From:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land's_End_to_John_o'_Groats



And yet they couldn't get real-time telemetry back to Mission Control
during the satellite deployments.
They said they only expected to lose it during the tenth deployment
(perhaps it occurred over the N or S pole). Did they announce what
went wrong?


Wasn't there a comment during an earlier part of the flight about losing
communication with a ground station? I think that meant communication on
Earth between the ground station and the launch site where the webcast
was coming from.

If that problem hadn't been fixed it could have resulted in another loss
of communication later. I seem to remember that there are several ground
stations distributed round the Earth to maintain line-of-site with the
rocket/spacecraft as it orbits.

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
 




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