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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Local low-power transmitters



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 22nd 16, 07:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Steve Thackery[_4_]
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Posts: 17
Default Local low-power transmitters

I've been having some fun perusing the very informative Wolfbane web
site (http://www.wolfbane.com/) and a question comes to mind. I see
that a lot of low power local transmitters transmit only three of the
muxes.

For instance, near me I have Ambergate, Bolehill, Belper, Derby plus
others, and they only transmit muxes 1, 2 and B.

Does that mean that people using those transmitters are missing out
on all the channels that are broadcast on muxes A, C and D?

--
Steve Thackery, Nottingham, UK
  #2  
Old December 22nd 16, 11:40 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,414
Default Local low-power transmitters

On 22 Dec 2016 20:16:00 GMT, Steve Thackery wrote:

For instance, near me I have Ambergate, Bolehill, Belper, Derby plus
others, and they only transmit muxes 1, 2 and B.

Does that mean that people using those transmitters are missing out
on all the channels that are broadcast on muxes A, C and D?


Duh. Do you really need that answering? Is not not absolutely
bleedin' obvious?
You can't receive what it don't transmit...
  #3  
Old December 23rd 16, 12:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Steve Thackery[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 17
Default Local low-power transmitters

Paul Ratcliffe wrote:

Duh. Do you really need that answering? Is not not absolutely
bleedin' obvious?
You can't receive what it don't transmit...


I see the years haven't mellowed you, Paul.

No, I was wondering if there was some kind of arrangement which I
wasn't aware of for getting the other channels to people. I don't
know much about this stuff, but maybe the idea is that the other
muxes could be picked up off another transmitter, or something. Or
maybe they could forego HD and shove all the SD channels into the
three muxes. Or some other arrangement I haven't thought of.

When can we expect you to mature into an adult, Paul? It can't come
soon enough for my liking.

--
Steve Thackery, Nottingham, UK
  #4  
Old December 23rd 16, 01:52 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
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Posts: 1,638
Default Local low-power transmitters


"Steve Thackery" wrote in message
...
Paul Ratcliffe wrote:

Duh. Do you really need that answering? Is not not absolutely
bleedin' obvious?
You can't receive what it don't transmit...


I see the years haven't mellowed you, Paul.

No, I was wondering if there was some kind of arrangement which I
wasn't aware of for getting the other channels to people. I don't
know much about this stuff, but maybe the idea is that the other
muxes could be picked up off another transmitter, or something. Or
maybe they could forego HD and shove all the SD channels into the
three muxes. Or some other arrangement I haven't thought of.

When can we expect you to mature into an adult, Paul? It can't come
soon enough for my liking.


Small relay sites only transmit what are now known as PSB1-3, or what
used to be BBCA, D3/4, amd BBCB. They have become known in the trade
as 'Freeview Lite.'

PSB1 carries all BBC channels and radio
PSB2 carries the regular ITV channels as in ITV, CH4, five, ITV2 and a
couple of others plus more radio.
PSB3 uses DVB-T2 and transits the basic HD channels, BBC1, BBC2, ITV,
Ch4 and five.

Most of these stations are off-air repeaters from main stations or in
some cases upgraded relays. For example Sheffield and Chesterfield
used to be relays off Emley in analogue days but are now classed as
main stations. Neither are now relays and both transmit Com4-6 as
well. Nottingham (Kimberley) also falls into this category. (Sheffield
and Kimberley also transmit local TV.)

Some of the original main stations, such as Emley and Sutton Coldfield
are what are known as 'enhanced' transmitters and transmit Com7-8
which both use DVB-T2 for transmission but not all stations on those
muxes are in HD.

Having been involved with DSO at Bole Hill I know for fact that it is
only Freeview Lite. If you look at ukfree.tv you will find all you
need on channel/station information for every transmitter in the
country.


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #5  
Old December 23rd 16, 05:58 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,611
Default Local low-power transmitters

On 23/12/2016 02:52, Woody wrote:

Small relay sites only transmit what are now known as PSB1-3, or what
used to be BBCA, D3/4, amd BBCB. They have become known in the trade
as 'Freeview Lite.'


I invented that expression and used it in an article in What Satellite
many years ago.

Bill

  #6  
Old December 23rd 16, 07:56 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,504
Default Local low-power transmitters

Kind of makes you wonder if its really any point in it, you would be better
of with a sat dish and a tv to match.


Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Chris Hogg" wrote in message
...
On 22 Dec 2016 20:16:00 GMT, "Steve Thackery"
wrote:

I've been having some fun perusing the very informative Wolfbane web
site (
http://www.wolfbane.com/) and a question comes to mind. I see
that a lot of low power local transmitters transmit only three of the
muxes.

For instance, near me I have Ambergate, Bolehill, Belper, Derby plus
others, and they only transmit muxes 1, 2 and B.

Does that mean that people using those transmitters are missing out
on all the channels that are broadcast on muxes A, C and D?


I don't know if this answers your question, but we receive from a
low-power relay transmitter that only transmits 'Freeview Light',
consisting only of PSB channels, none of the commercial or COM ones.
AIUI all low-power relay transmitters transmit only 'Freeview Light'.
https://ukfree.tv/transmitters/tv/Praa_Sands
http://www.digitaluk.co.uk/operations/multiplexes

--

Chris



  #7  
Old December 23rd 16, 08:11 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 252
Default Local low-power transmitters

On 23/12/2016 02:52, Woody wrote:
If you look at ukfree.tv you will find all you
need on channel/station information for every transmitter in the
country.


How many times do I have to say this, please please please, take that
site with a large pinch of salt, a lot of it is speculation, and wishful
thinking) The new post 700 MHZ allocations listed on there are pure
fiction (I was talking to a friend at Arqiva about it).

Why do you keep linking to it Woody ?

Use this:-

http://www.ofcom.org.uk/static/broad...uency-plan.xls

Or this (use the 'detailed view' click box)

http://www.digitaluk.co.uk/coveragechecker/




--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #8  
Old December 23rd 16, 08:33 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,638
Default Local low-power transmitters


"Mark Carver" wrote in message
...
On 23/12/2016 02:52, Woody wrote:
If you look at ukfree.tv you will find all you
need on channel/station information for every transmitter in the
country.


How many times do I have to say this, please please please, take
that site with a large pinch of salt, a lot of it is speculation,
and wishful thinking) The new post 700 MHZ allocations listed on
there are pure fiction (I was talking to a friend at Arqiva about
it).

Why do you keep linking to it Woody ?

Use this:-

http://www.ofcom.org.uk/static/broad...uency-plan.xls

Or this (use the 'detailed view' click box)

http://www.digitaluk.co.uk/coveragechecker/




For a not-so-technical person it is still a good site as most of it is
pretty well right, it shows the muxes on the site and what those muxes
carry. Only technically interested people will go digging around it
for the 700MHz allocations that are not even going to be in use for a
couple of years yet, so for Joe Public it is probably more useful than
not.

I would not argue that the links above are worthwhile but they are
still not that 'user friendly' to a non-tech, where at least ukfree.tv
does make an attempt to indicate what the coverage might be.



--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #9  
Old December 23rd 16, 08:38 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 252
Default Local low-power transmitters

On 23/12/2016 09:33, Woody wrote:

Why do you keep linking to it Woody ?

Use this:-

http://www.ofcom.org.uk/static/broad...uency-plan.xls

Or this (use the 'detailed view' click box)

http://www.digitaluk.co.uk/coveragechecker/




For a not-so-technical person it is still a good site as most of it is
pretty well right,


This is (or was !) a technical newsgroup, (the clue is in the name)
therefore we should all strive for maximum possible technical accuracy.

That said, the Digital UK site, does in its basic form, present
information in layman's terms perfectly (using a bona fide technical
database to drive it)


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #10  
Old December 23rd 16, 09:36 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,414
Default Local low-power transmitters

On Fri, 23 Dec 2016 09:38:18 +0000, Mark Carver
wrote:

For a not-so-technical person it is still a good site as most of it is
pretty well right,


This is (or was !) a technical newsgroup, (the clue is in the name)
therefore we should all strive for maximum possible technical accuracy.

That said, the Digital UK site, does in its basic form, present
information in layman's terms perfectly (using a bona fide technical
database to drive it)


Like mostly everything else these days, this newsgroup has been
dumbed down by stupidity, ignorance, laziness and sheer pig-headedness
of most of the people who post to it.
Unworthy sites like ukfree.tv profit from these attitudes, sadly.
 




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