A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Local low-power transmitters



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old December 25th 16, 02:22 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ashley Booth[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 90
Default Local low-power transmitters

Mark Carver wrote:

On 24/12/2016 12:49, Jim Lesurf wrote:
I recall that the gate had a chain with a
'series' of padlocks. This was so the various site users could each
have their own padlock and key rather than organising a shared one.


And there's mechanisms that are cleverer and neater than a chain,

Bottom shot he-

http://tx.mb21.co.uk/gallery/toothill.php


Going to a mid-point when working for ITN Links I always carried a
hacksaw and a padlock.

Remove a link from the chain and replace it with the padlock.

--


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

  #42  
Old December 25th 16, 04:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,622
Default Local low-power transmitters


"Ashley Booth" wrote in message
...
Mark Carver wrote:

On 24/12/2016 12:49, Jim Lesurf wrote:
I recall that the gate had a chain with a
'series' of padlocks. This was so the various site users could
each
have their own padlock and key rather than organising a shared
one.


And there's mechanisms that are cleverer and neater than a chain,

Bottom shot he-

http://tx.mb21.co.uk/gallery/toothill.php


Going to a mid-point when working for ITN Links I always carried a
hacksaw and a padlock.

Remove a link from the chain and replace it with the padlock.

--



Since we had four different types of padlock it was not unusual -
especially on sites with PMR as well - to find two or even three of
them in the chain. Easy.

The best though was to have a Vodafone key as that got you into almost
anywhere!


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #43  
Old December 26th 16, 08:24 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,543
Default Local low-power transmitters

On 25/12/2016 17:29, Woody wrote:

The best though was to have a Vodafone key as that got you into almost
anywhere!


When I was working I had 'engineering keys' to various hospitals.
Security was absurdly lax.

At the height of the IRA terrorism I once arrived at a sports venue to
install a TV set, and went completely unchallenged into a room where HRH
Princess Anne was due to set up camp later that day. In that room I
lifted ceiling tiles and could easily have planted a bomb. No-one took
the slightest notice.

Bill
  #44  
Old December 26th 16, 08:43 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,622
Default Local low-power transmitters


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 25/12/2016 17:29, Woody wrote:

The best though was to have a Vodafone key as that got you into
almost
anywhere!


When I was working I had 'engineering keys' to various hospitals.
Security was absurdly lax.

At the height of the IRA terrorism I once arrived at a sports venue
to install a TV set, and went completely unchallenged into a room
where HRH Princess Anne was due to set up camp later that day. In
that room I lifted ceiling tiles and could easily have planted a
bomb. No-one took the slightest notice.


The opposite side of that is prisons where the mantra seems to be
'trust no-one', yet they have phones, drugs, etc etc in there.
Everyone - visitors, staff, even prison transfer and police vehicles -
all went through the same procedure whether on foot or otherwise. I
got so fed up with it that I took the absolute minimum of test gear in
and used the works electrician's tools as he had a workshop next door
to the equipment room.


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #45  
Old December 26th 16, 09:18 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,931
Default Local low-power transmitters

On Mon, 26 Dec 2016 09:24:07 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

The best though was to have a Vodafone key as that got you into almost
anywhere!


When I was working I had 'engineering keys' to various hospitals.
Security was absurdly lax.

At the height of the IRA terrorism I once arrived at a sports venue to
install a TV set, and went completely unchallenged into a room where HRH
Princess Anne was due to set up camp later that day. In that room I
lifted ceiling tiles and could easily have planted a bomb. No-one took
the slightest notice.


I wonder how our general attitude to security is going to evolve in
light of the recent apparent realisation by religious murderers that
if you want to kill lots of people indiscriminately you don't even
need to use explosives. You don't need discreet contacts to obtain the
materials, or any expertise with chemistry or electronics, or
clandestime premises to manufacture the bombs, or to face the risk
that your enterprise might be discovered at any time.

All you need is a vehicle, and anybody can get hold of one of those
with no suspicion at all. Or you could just steal one, a practice that
has been commonplace for many years. It's difficult to imagine any
security measures that would eliminate this risk without rendering the
entire concept of motoring completely useless. A garage full of
homemade bombs would make their intended use pretty clear, but there's
nothing about a lorry or a van that tells you anything about what some
religious nutter might do with it.

Rod.
  #46  
Old December 27th 16, 08:16 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Robin[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 371
Default Local low-power transmitters

On 23/12/2016 20:00, charles wrote:
"super-counties" (Regions) scheme was tried out in Scotland & Wales
and then never done in England


I think that's potentially very misleading so a couple more OT points

a. the reorganisation in Scotland was not really a trial: it was
recommended by Scots, for Scotland, without regard to E&W, against the
b/g of widespread desire for reform. See eg
http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Government/local-government/localg/history

b. while E&W did not have the same loss of "shires"[1], the
reorganisation in 1974 that (among other things) created metropolitan
counties and a 2-tier system was similar in approach.

[1] though some in Yorkshire seemed to think the 4 horsemen were riding
out

--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
  #47  
Old December 27th 16, 10:52 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,543
Default Local low-power transmitters

On 26/12/2016 09:43, Woody wrote:

The opposite side of that is prisons where the mantra seems to be
'trust no-one', yet they have phones, drugs, etc etc in there.
Everyone - visitors, staff, even prison transfer and police vehicles -
all went through the same procedure whether on foot or otherwise. I
got so fed up with it that I took the absolute minimum of test gear in
and used the works electrician's tools as he had a workshop next door
to the equipment room.


Agreed, and yet I witnessed many security breaches in prisons. Obviously
I can't say any more.

Bill
  #48  
Old December 27th 16, 10:54 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,543
Default Local low-power transmitters

On 26/12/2016 10:18, Roderick Stewart wrote:

All you need is a vehicle, and anybody can get hold of one of those
with no suspicion at all. Or you could just steal one, a practice that
has been commonplace for many years. It's difficult to imagine any
security measures that would eliminate this risk without rendering the
entire concept of motoring completely useless. A garage full of
homemade bombs would make their intended use pretty clear, but there's
nothing about a lorry or a van that tells you anything about what some
religious nutter might do with it.

Rod.

The solution (which will not be adopted) is to intern all suspects.

Bill
  #49  
Old December 28th 16, 09:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,931
Default Local low-power transmitters

On Tue, 27 Dec 2016 11:54:30 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

All you need is a vehicle, and anybody can get hold of one of those
with no suspicion at all. Or you could just steal one, a practice that
has been commonplace for many years. It's difficult to imagine any
security measures that would eliminate this risk without rendering the
entire concept of motoring completely useless. A garage full of
homemade bombs would make their intended use pretty clear, but there's
nothing about a lorry or a van that tells you anything about what some
religious nutter might do with it.

Rod.

The solution (which will not be adopted) is to intern all suspects.


Define "suspect".

Try to define it, in this context, without defining it as "any brown
person who speaks Arabic", because that will get you into trouble with
those who guard free speech against the right to use it.

Rod.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2017 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.