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Complaint from a tenant today



 
 
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  #11  
Old December 23rd 16, 06:09 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,720
Default Complaint from a tenant today

On 23/12/2016 19:05, Pinnerite wrote:
Bill Wright wrote:


I had a customer who followed up my every remark with "So you say!" I
was at his house once when the phone rang. He listened to the voice at
the other end then, "So you say!" Listened a bit more then, "So you say!"


My wife and her first cousin have an irritating habit which is to assume
that anyone who refuses a second helping of anything do not know their own
minds. "Are you sure?" absolutely grates on me.


Maybe they assume that polite people will always refuse initially in
case they will be thought greedy.

--
Max Demian
  #12  
Old December 23rd 16, 07:15 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
pinnerite
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 71
Default Complaint from a tenant today

Max Demian wrote:

On 23/12/2016 19:05, Pinnerite wrote:
Bill Wright wrote:


I had a customer who followed up my every remark with "So you say!" I
was at his house once when the phone rang. He listened to the voice at
the other end then, "So you say!" Listened a bit more then, "So you
say!"


My wife and her first cousin have an irritating habit which is to assume
that anyone who refuses a second helping of anything do not know their
own minds. "Are you sure?" absolutely grates on me.


Maybe they assume that polite people will always refuse initially in
case they will be thought greedy.


You are too courteous. It's in their dna. Their mothers and sisters did the
same. My father-in-law would automatically say 'No thank you' even when
asleep!


--
Mageia 5.1 for x86_64, Kernel:4.4.36-desktop-1.mga5
KDE version 4.14.5 on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition.

  #13  
Old December 24th 16, 10:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 436
Default Complaint from a tenant today

On Friday, 23 December 2016 19:05:07 UTC, Pinnerite wrote:
Bill Wright wrote:

On 23/12/2016 08:49, Brian Gaff wrote:
There were in the old days many people you met when around a house with
what I used to call human ghosting.
They used to say everything twice for some reason as if it was required
as
nobody would believe them otherwise.

I think a certain person used to write about such an individual in
television Magazine, mr Doubleday as I recall. these people still exist I
am told.
Brian


I had a customer who followed up my every remark with "So you say!" I
was at his house once when the phone rang. He listened to the voice at
the other end then, "So you say!" Listened a bit more then, "So you say!"

Bill


My wife and her first cousin have an irritating habit which is to assume
that anyone who refuses a second helping of anything do not know their own
minds. "Are you sure?" absolutely grates on me.


I'll bet that when your wife says "Not tonight, I'v got a headache.", you ask "Are you sure?".



Alan


  #14  
Old December 24th 16, 10:29 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,720
Default Complaint from a tenant today

On Sat, 24 Dec 2016 03:26:28 -0800 (PST), "R. Mark Clayton"
wrote:
On Friday, 23 December 2016 19:05:07 UTC, Pinnerite wrote:


My wife and her first cousin have an irritating habit which is to

assume
that anyone who refuses a second helping of anything do not know

their own
minds. "Are you sure?" absolutely grates on me.


I'll bet that when your wife says "Not tonight, I'v got a

headache.", you ask "Are you sure?".

Or, "It's not your head I'm interested in."

--
Max Demian
  #15  
Old December 24th 16, 10:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 381
Default Complaint from a tenant today

On Fri, 23 Dec 2016 14:10:32 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

On 23/12/2016 08:49, Brian Gaff wrote:
There were in the old days many people you met when around a house with what
I used to call human ghosting.
They used to say everything twice for some reason as if it was required as
nobody would believe them otherwise.

I think a certain person used to write about such an individual in
television Magazine, mr Doubleday as I recall. these people still exist I am
told.
Brian


I had a customer who followed up my every remark with "So you say!" I
was at his house once when the phone rang. He listened to the voice at
the other end then, "So you say!" Listened a bit more then, "So you say!"

Bill


It's disconserting when you leave a customers house after, from your
perspective, a successful visit, and the customer says "Thanks",
followed by the qualification "Anyway".

In my early days as a field engineer, I worked in the various council
estates in and around Middleton (near Rochdale).

It was quite common for parents to refer to you as The Master.

eg. "That Master will take you away in his tool-case if you don't shut
up".


--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #16  
Old December 25th 16, 12:27 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,676
Default Complaint from a tenant today

On 24/12/2016 23:29, Graham. wrote:


It was quite common for parents to refer to you as The Master.

eg. "That Master will take you away in his tool-case if you don't shut
up".


It was 'mister' round here. "Now don't be a bad lad. Give the mister his
drill back."

Bill


  #17  
Old December 25th 16, 12:46 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 554
Default Complaint from a tenant today

Is this not the old Groucho Marks Joke.
Lots of You don't say etc, and when asked who was on the phone he said, he
didn't say.

No the human ghosting is a bit like those elderly folk who forget they
already told you something except often they are not elderly and they repeat
because on the day the engineer visits the problem they describe does not
put in an appearance. haunted TVs do exist, I am sure of it.
I actually feel its the way people use them. Not so bad these days when its
just usually a knackered remote that nobody can get a new one of, but when
people had to get up and push buttons and twist knobs I suspect some people
just were not as gentle or did it in some odd way, so the device resented
this abuse and malfunctioned.

mechanical push buttons that suddenly release the pressed in one was quit
common then later on the varicap tuner controlled by grotty multi turn pots
or thumb wheels that went noisy and moved the tuning all over the place.

I found the latter was a serious issue on Philips VCRs of the N1700 kind,
which otherwise were pretty robust and bloody heavy machines.

Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
Remember, if you don't like where I post
or what I say, you don't have to
read my posts! :-)
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 23/12/2016 08:49, Brian Gaff wrote:
There were in the old days many people you met when around a house with
what
I used to call human ghosting.
They used to say everything twice for some reason as if it was required
as
nobody would believe them otherwise.

I think a certain person used to write about such an individual in
television Magazine, mr Doubleday as I recall. these people still exist I
am
told.
Brian


I had a customer who followed up my every remark with "So you say!" I was
at his house once when the phone rang. He listened to the voice at the
other end then, "So you say!" Listened a bit more then, "So you say!"

Bill



  #18  
Old December 25th 16, 12:48 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 554
Default Complaint from a tenant today

Hmm, I'm always being fed food as if the whole world revolved around the
uninvited provision of the stuff. I have to watch my diet these days and its
sometimes very hard not to be rude at this time of year when friends invite
you over and then ply you with cakes and stuff.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
Remember, if you don't like where I post
or what I say, you don't have to
read my posts! :-)
"Pinnerite" wrote in message
news
Bill Wright wrote:

On 23/12/2016 08:49, Brian Gaff wrote:
There were in the old days many people you met when around a house with
what I used to call human ghosting.
They used to say everything twice for some reason as if it was required
as
nobody would believe them otherwise.

I think a certain person used to write about such an individual in
television Magazine, mr Doubleday as I recall. these people still exist
I
am told.
Brian


I had a customer who followed up my every remark with "So you say!" I
was at his house once when the phone rang. He listened to the voice at
the other end then, "So you say!" Listened a bit more then, "So you say!"

Bill


My wife and her first cousin have an irritating habit which is to assume
that anyone who refuses a second helping of anything do not know their own
minds. "Are you sure?" absolutely grates on me.

Alan

--
Mageia 5.1 for x86_64, Kernel:4.4.36-desktop-1.mga5
KDE version 4.14.5 on an AMD Phenom II X4 Black edition.



  #19  
Old December 25th 16, 12:52 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 554
Default Complaint from a tenant today

Never heard that one before..
I do however remember that if my father had had a fiver for every time a
particular remark was made he would be a rich man.
The remark?
I think the picture valve has gone.
I'd love to know what the modern equiv of this is, but then these days
nobody repairs anything, do they they just domp it and buy another one.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
Remember, if you don't like where I post
or what I say, you don't have to
read my posts! :-)
"Graham." wrote in message
news
On Fri, 23 Dec 2016 14:10:32 +0000, Bill Wright
wrote:

On 23/12/2016 08:49, Brian Gaff wrote:
There were in the old days many people you met when around a house with
what
I used to call human ghosting.
They used to say everything twice for some reason as if it was required
as
nobody would believe them otherwise.

I think a certain person used to write about such an individual in
television Magazine, mr Doubleday as I recall. these people still exist
I am
told.
Brian


I had a customer who followed up my every remark with "So you say!" I
was at his house once when the phone rang. He listened to the voice at
the other end then, "So you say!" Listened a bit more then, "So you say!"

Bill


It's disconserting when you leave a customers house after, from your
perspective, a successful visit, and the customer says "Thanks",
followed by the qualification "Anyway".

In my early days as a field engineer, I worked in the various council
estates in and around Middleton (near Rochdale).

It was quite common for parents to refer to you as The Master.

eg. "That Master will take you away in his tool-case if you don't shut
up".


--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%



  #20  
Old December 25th 16, 12:54 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 554
Default Complaint from a tenant today

And what about the health and safety aspects of hot soldering irons when
there are children about. as I say nobody does that kind of thing in houses
any more if at all.

Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
Remember, if you don't like where I post
or what I say, you don't have to
read my posts! :-)
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
news
On 24/12/2016 23:29, Graham. wrote:


It was quite common for parents to refer to you as The Master.

eg. "That Master will take you away in his tool-case if you don't shut
up".


It was 'mister' round here. "Now don't be a bad lad. Give the mister his
drill back."

Bill




 




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