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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

It's almost like having valves...



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 19th 16, 07:37 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul D Smith[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 720
Default It's almost like having valves...

My LCD TV, a pretty recent Panasonic, has an interesting problem that I
thought the group might find amusing. Being as tight as insert suitable
phrase, I keep the house at a pleasant 18degC and with the TV close to the
chimney (partially blocked but there's still some air through it), I imagine
that corner of the room is slightly colder.

So I find that when I turn on the TV I observe that the screen is vaguely
grey and if I've had the program guide up, it's visible in the background as
a ghost for sometime afterwards, just like the old days of screen burn.
Eventually all this goes away and the screen becomes black at the right
times and images don't hang around so I'm guessing that the TV is quite
literally warming up and until it does the LC of the LCDs are not moving
properly.

Perhaps TVs should come with the LCD equivalent of a 'block heater' (used to
pre-warm cars in cold climes) :-).

And FYI, leaving it on standby instead of off doesn't help.

Paul DS.

  #2  
Old December 19th 16, 08:45 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,622
Default It's almost like having valves...


"Paul D Smith" wrote in message
news
My LCD TV, a pretty recent Panasonic, has an interesting problem
that I thought the group might find amusing. Being as tight as
insert suitable phrase, I keep the house at a pleasant 18degC and
with the TV close to the chimney (partially blocked but there's
still some air through it), I imagine that corner of the room is
slightly colder.

So I find that when I turn on the TV I observe that the screen is
vaguely grey and if I've had the program guide up, it's visible in
the background as a ghost for sometime afterwards, just like the old
days of screen burn. Eventually all this goes away and the screen
becomes black at the right times and images don't hang around so I'm
guessing that the TV is quite literally warming up and until it does
the LC of the LCDs are not moving properly.

Perhaps TVs should come with the LCD equivalent of a 'block heater'
(used to pre-warm cars in cold climes) :-).

And FYI, leaving it on standby instead of off doesn't help.




LCDs are well known to be lazy when cold, but they eventually warm up
from their own lighting and the TV electronics and perform as they
should. You could of course try wrapping it in a blanket to keep it
warm at night?

18C in a living room is a bit on the cold side - usual recommendation
is 20-22C living and 18C for bedrooms.


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #3  
Old December 19th 16, 12:33 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,543
Default It's almost like having valves...

On 19/12/2016 09:45, Woody wrote:
"Paul D Smith" wrote in message
news


18C in a living room is a bit on the cold side - usual recommendation
is 20-22C living and 18C for bedrooms.


I keep my whole house at 22C. It's too hot really so I have to strip
off. The reason I keep the house so warm is that I don't like the
greenies telling me to save energy.

Bill
  #4  
Old December 19th 16, 02:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,622
Default It's almost like having valves...


"Martin" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 09:45:07 -0000, "Woody"
wrote:


"Paul D Smith" wrote in message
news
My LCD TV, a pretty recent Panasonic, has an interesting problem
that I thought the group might find amusing. Being as tight as
insert suitable phrase, I keep the house at a pleasant 18degC
and
with the TV close to the chimney (partially blocked but there's
still some air through it), I imagine that corner of the room is
slightly colder.

So I find that when I turn on the TV I observe that the screen is
vaguely grey and if I've had the program guide up, it's visible in
the background as a ghost for sometime afterwards, just like the
old
days of screen burn. Eventually all this goes away and the screen
becomes black at the right times and images don't hang around so
I'm
guessing that the TV is quite literally warming up and until it
does
the LC of the LCDs are not moving properly.

Perhaps TVs should come with the LCD equivalent of a 'block
heater'
(used to pre-warm cars in cold climes) :-).

And FYI, leaving it on standby instead of off doesn't help.




LCDs are well known to be lazy when cold, but they eventually warm
up
from their own lighting and the TV electronics and perform as they
should. You could of course try wrapping it in a blanket to keep it
warm at night?

18C in a living room is a bit on the cold side - usual
recommendation
is 20-22C living

if you have small children otherwise 18-22C according to Watchdog.
We have our
living room set to 22C
and 18C for bedrooms.


We sleep in an unheated bedroom, except in very cold winters.
--



Yes but............ being in Dutchland I would guess the levels of
insulation are significantly higher than over here, so even if you
don't heat it I bet it isn't cold either?


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #5  
Old December 19th 16, 07:31 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,431
Default It's almost like having valves...

Hmm, no its not. I do have a valve amp on my computer. It saves on the
heating and you get that added wonderful smell of warming up dust and stuff
that I used to miss with transistors.
I do recall though that the very first cd player I had and still have made
by philips cd100, has a similar smell due to an analogue power supply at the
back with a nice black finned heatsink.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Paul D Smith" wrote in message
news
My LCD TV, a pretty recent Panasonic, has an interesting problem that I
thought the group might find amusing. Being as tight as insert suitable
phrase, I keep the house at a pleasant 18degC and with the TV close to
the chimney (partially blocked but there's still some air through it), I
imagine that corner of the room is slightly colder.

So I find that when I turn on the TV I observe that the screen is vaguely
grey and if I've had the program guide up, it's visible in the background
as a ghost for sometime afterwards, just like the old days of screen burn.
Eventually all this goes away and the screen becomes black at the right
times and images don't hang around so I'm guessing that the TV is quite
literally warming up and until it does the LC of the LCDs are not moving
properly.

Perhaps TVs should come with the LCD equivalent of a 'block heater' (used
to pre-warm cars in cold climes) :-).

And FYI, leaving it on standby instead of off doesn't help.

Paul DS.



  #6  
Old December 19th 16, 07:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,681
Default It's almost like having valves...

On 19/12/2016 14:31, Martin wrote:
On Mon, 19 Dec 2016 09:45:07 -0000, "Woody" wrote:


18C in a living room is a bit on the cold side - usual recommendation
is 20-22C living

if you have small children otherwise 18-22C according to Watchdog. We have our
living room set to 22C
and 18C for bedrooms.


We sleep in an unheated bedroom, except in very cold winters.


By unheated, do you mean heated during the day, or never heated? What
about stray heating from heated parts of the house? In the days before
central heating, unheated bedrooms were really freezing, especially if a
long way from the heated living room.


--
Max Demian
  #7  
Old December 20th 16, 08:31 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul D Smith[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 720
Default It's almost like having valves...

....snip...


We sleep in an unheated bedroom, except in very cold winters.
--



Yes but............ being in Dutchland I would guess the levels of
insulation are significantly higher than over here, so even if you
don't heat it I bet it isn't cold either?


modern UK houses are better insulated that a 1967 Dutch house :-)

I'd always slept in unheated bedrooms in UK, except in modern hotels.
--
I have the windows open unless it's quite a bit below zero all night. I
also live in an uninsulated 1930s solid wall house with a flat roof and zero
insulation and getting it up much above 18degC is hard. I'd like to
insulate but that involves removing the roof or ceilings throughout the
house and removing the external render, cladding and re-rendering. It will
get done at some point but it's not cheap and there are more pressing
matters tugging at my wallet.

Paul DS.

  #8  
Old December 20th 16, 10:27 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Terry Casey[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 691
Default It's almost like having valves...

In article ,
says...


It helps if you put the content of your post ABOVE the
signature separator rather than below it!

--

Terry
  #9  
Old December 20th 16, 10:46 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 406
Default It's almost like having valves...

On Monday, 19 December 2016 20:31:40 UTC, Brian Gaff wrote:
Hmm, no its not. I do have a valve amp on my computer. It saves on the
heating and you get that added wonderful smell of warming up dust and stuff
that I used to miss with transistors.
I do recall though that the very first cd player I had and still have made
by philips cd100, has a similar smell due to an analogue power supply at the
back with a nice black finned heatsink.
Brian


You mean using a mains transformer and rectification, rather than switched mode?


--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Paul D Smith" wrote in message
news
My LCD TV, a pretty recent Panasonic, has an interesting problem that I
thought the group might find amusing. Being as tight as insert suitable
phrase, I keep the house at a pleasant 18degC and with the TV close to
the chimney (partially blocked but there's still some air through it), I
imagine that corner of the room is slightly colder.

So I find that when I turn on the TV I observe that the screen is vaguely
grey and if I've had the program guide up, it's visible in the background
as a ghost for sometime afterwards, just like the old days of screen burn.
Eventually all this goes away and the screen becomes black at the right
times and images don't hang around so I'm guessing that the TV is quite
literally warming up and until it does the LC of the LCDs are not moving
properly.

Perhaps TVs should come with the LCD equivalent of a 'block heater' (used
to pre-warm cars in cold climes) :-).


You can still get them [and auxiliary heating] in the USa or posh cars destined for very cold countries.


And FYI, leaving it on standby instead of off doesn't help.


0.5W is not going to keep the screen much above ambient.


Paul DS.


  #10  
Old December 20th 16, 01:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave W
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 224
Default It's almost like having valves...


"Paul D Smith" wrote in message
news
...snip...


We sleep in an unheated bedroom, except in very cold winters.
--



Yes but............ being in Dutchland I would guess the levels of
insulation are significantly higher than over here, so even if you
don't heat it I bet it isn't cold either?


modern UK houses are better insulated that a 1967 Dutch house :-)

I'd always slept in unheated bedrooms in UK, except in modern hotels.
--
I have the windows open unless it's quite a bit below zero all night. I
also live in an uninsulated 1930s solid wall house with a flat roof and
zero insulation and getting it up much above 18degC is hard. I'd like to
insulate but that involves removing the roof or ceilings throughout the
house and removing the external render, cladding and re-rendering. It
will get done at some point but it's not cheap and there are more pressing
matters tugging at my wallet.

Paul DS.

I trump you with my 1901 terrace house. It does have the advantage of
sucking in quite a bit of heat from my neighbours on both sides though. I
too have the windows open most of the time, and hate being in environments
where the temperature is the same everywhere.
--
Dave W


 




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