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BBC3



 
 
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  #21  
Old December 9th 16, 11:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham Murray
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Posts: 225
Default BBC3

Martin writes:

BBC/ BBC contractor brings the prosecutions. The BBC's interpretation is the one
that counts.


Surely the one that counts is that of the judge who rules whether the
BBC's interpretation is correct.
  #22  
Old December 9th 16, 12:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
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Posts: 293
Default BBC3

On 09/12/2016 12:03, Graham Murray wrote:
"Brian Gaff" writes:

Stop talking rot. There is no such thing as a radio only licence. It is
excepted by other legislation. However bbc 3 has video and thus is tv.


Apart from being shown on iPlayer, what makes BBC3 'TV Programmes' where
productions shown on Amazon, Netflix etc. are not 'TV'.


BBC 3 programmes are programmes made with licence fee money, it's not
that you are viewing them per se, that a licence is required.

What's interesting is the line about S4C. The BBC have always supplied
programming to S4C free of charge (and adverts were not (still aren't ?)
permitted in and around them).

A few years ago, when it became clear that S4C was no longer financially
viable to be supported by advertising alone (remember until DSO it used
to show timeshifted C4 programmes), then it was decided to divert some
of the licence fee towards it.



--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #23  
Old December 9th 16, 12:51 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Posts: 265
Default BBC3

On Fri, 9 Dec 2016 13:03:43 +0000
Mark Carver wrote:
A few years ago, when it became clear that S4C was no longer financially
viable to be supported by advertising alone (remember until DSO it used
to show timeshifted C4 programmes), then it was decided to divert some
of the licence fee towards it.


I feel sorry for the majority of the welsh people who had to watch that
parochial tripe instead of C4 just so a minority language could be kept on
life support. Anyone who wanted to speak welsh already did, it didn't need
an entire TV channel dedicated to it. Ditto the gaelic stuff up in scotland.

--
Spud


  #26  
Old December 9th 16, 03:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
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Posts: 265
Default BBC3

On Fri, 9 Dec 2016 14:43:51 +0000
Mark Carver wrote:
Digital telly was a godsend, C4 was available on Sky, and
OnDigital/Freeview, though of course none other than a couple of the
relays carried any DTT until DSO.


I imagine S4Cs viewing figures must be in the toilet these days other than
in a few welsh speaking areas.

--
Spud

  #27  
Old December 9th 16, 06:57 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_6_]
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Posts: 48
Default BBC3

In message , Paul
Cummins writes
In article ,
(Ian Jackson) wrote:

What I do think is daft are the bi-lingual 'Welcome to Scotland"
signs when you cross the border from England. The nearest
indigenous predominantly Gaelic speaker is probably at least 150
miles away.


And Gaelic is not an Indigenous language of Scotland in any case. There
is a linguistic distinction between English and Scottish Standard English,
together with a further distinction between SSE and Scots, which is the
spoken tongue among the majority.

This is not simply a dialectal difference, Scots is further from Standard
English then either American English or Australasian English.

I do miss The White Heather Club.
--
Ian
  #28  
Old December 9th 16, 07:04 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles[_2_]
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Posts: 538
Default BBC3

In article , Ian Jackson
wrote:
In message , Paul
Cummins writes
In article ,
(Ian Jackson) wrote:

What I do think is daft are the bi-lingual 'Welcome to Scotland" signs
when you cross the border from England. The nearest indigenous
predominantly Gaelic speaker is probably at least 150 miles away.


And Gaelic is not an Indigenous language of Scotland in any case. There
is a linguistic distinction between English and Scottish Standard
English, together with a further distinction between SSE and Scots,
which is the spoken tongue among the majority.

This is not simply a dialectal difference, Scots is further from
Standard English then either American English or Australasian English.

I do miss The White Heather Club.


you must be the only one ;-)

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
 




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