A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

BBC late running



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old December 12th 16, 07:03 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,016
Default BBC late running

On 11/12/2016 21:57, Paul Ratcliffe wrote:
On Thu, 08 Dec 2016 08:03:21 +0000, Chris J Dixon
wrote:

Most nights BBC One's The One Show runs minutes early.


There is a clear and deliberate difference between published
schedule and actual working timings.


Only two minutes. The standard granularity virtually industry
wide is 5.


I am old enough to remember when the BBC used to show a clock on the
screen counting down the last few seconds and every programme started
*exactly* at the listed time. If there was a little time to fill, the
voice of a continuity announcer was broadcast alongside the clock.

Of course there was a down side. If a broadcast (most likely the news)
overran, it would be cut off so that the next one could start.

Jim
  #22  
Old December 12th 16, 07:58 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 254
Default BBC late running

On 12/12/2016 08:03, Indy Jess John wrote:
On 11/12/2016 21:57, Paul Ratcliffe wrote:
On Thu, 08 Dec 2016 08:03:21 +0000, Chris J Dixon
wrote:

Most nights BBC One's The One Show runs minutes early.

There is a clear and deliberate difference between published
schedule and actual working timings.


Only two minutes. The standard granularity virtually industry
wide is 5.


I am old enough to remember when the BBC used to show a clock on the
screen counting down the last few seconds and every programme started
*exactly* at the listed time.


When was that ? I recall the clock being used before the news, and
Grandstand, but that was about it ? Times for most programmes were
never exactly 'on the dot' but yes, they were within a minute or two,
and rarely more than 30 secs early


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #23  
Old December 12th 16, 08:09 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,966
Default BBC late running

On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 21:52:58 GMT, Paul Ratcliffe
wrote:

And despite the Xmas/Hogmanay issue of Radio Times being a two-week
one,


It only covers 17-30th... no New Year at all.


It's bloody ridiculous. It should be 24th Dec. to 6th Jan.


Digiguide is already showing details until 6th Jan.

Rod.
  #24  
Old December 12th 16, 08:12 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 245
Default BBC late running

Mark Carver wrote:

Indy Jess John wrote:

I am old enough to remember when the BBC used to show a clock on the
screen counting down the last few seconds


I recall the clock being used before the news, and
Grandstand, but that was about it ?


And before school programmes, though I think it was the ITV school clock
that slowly ate itself as part of the countdown


  #25  
Old December 12th 16, 08:21 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,966
Default BBC late running

On Mon, 12 Dec 2016 08:58:44 +0000, Mark Carver
wrote:

Most nights BBC One's The One Show runs minutes early.

There is a clear and deliberate difference between published
schedule and actual working timings.

Only two minutes. The standard granularity virtually industry
wide is 5.


I am old enough to remember when the BBC used to show a clock on the
screen counting down the last few seconds and every programme started
*exactly* at the listed time.


When was that ? I recall the clock being used before the news, and
Grandstand, but that was about it ? Times for most programmes were
never exactly 'on the dot' but yes, they were within a minute or two,
and rarely more than 30 secs early


I remember it too. Throughout most of the years BD, that is "Before
Digital", clocks were sometimes shown on TV and the Greenwich pips
were broadcast on the wireless, and whenever both were available at
the same programme junction, it was possible to verify that they
corresponded exactly. On a few such occasions I called the speaking
clock on the phone just out of curiosity and found that it too agreed
to the second. You could set your watch by the BBC and know that it
could be trusted absolutely. No such thing as an ntp server then...

Rod.
  #26  
Old December 12th 16, 08:50 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 254
Default BBC late running

On 12/12/2016 09:21, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Mon, 12 Dec 2016 08:58:44 +0000, Mark Carver


When was that ? I recall the clock being used before the news, and
Grandstand, but that was about it ? Times for most programmes were
never exactly 'on the dot' but yes, they were within a minute or two,
and rarely more than 30 secs early


I remember it too. Throughout most of the years BD, that is "Before
Digital", clocks were sometimes shown on TV and the Greenwich pips
were broadcast on the wireless, and whenever both were available at
the same programme junction, it was possible to verify that they
corresponded exactly. On a few such occasions I called the speaking
clock on the phone just out of curiosity and found that it too agreed
to the second. You could set your watch by the BBC and know that it
could be trusted absolutely. No such thing as an ntp server then...


All 'on screen' clocks deliberately ran half a second fast, so you'd see
them 'hit the top' before cutting to the programme.

Veering off topic, with MSF etc being increasing difficult to receive
owing to the Tx being too far away (for us Southerners) and for all
getting lost in RF pollution, is anybody aware of a clock that simply
takes a sniff of ntp via a WiFi network ? Be simples, would it not ?




--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #27  
Old December 12th 16, 08:59 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,966
Default BBC late running

On Mon, 12 Dec 2016 03:23:51 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

I can understand such reluctance to use a desktop PC as a domestic PVR
since most tend to generate fan and hard drive noise and take up
considerably more room than a typical 'Shop Bought' PVR designed to
discretely rest on the shelf of a typical TV stand.

However, since all PVRs are essentially underpowered computers with
proprietary OS firmware, there's no reason not to build a small form
factor PC that can outdo the typical shop bought PVR for about the same
power consumption yet with far more cpu grunt even though it may contain
less processing power than a cheap entry level desktop machine.


There's rather less reason to do so now, if you don't want to archive
everything but simply want to watch current TV programmes at times
that suit you rather than the broadcasters, and you have an internet
service that is good enough to use a streaming box. Some years ago I
built a dedicated PC as a media centre and used that for a while to
access things like iPlayer and YouTube, but later aquired a streaming
box, since when I've hardly ever switched the PC on. My internet
streaming box is the Amazon one, but presumably the others are
similar. Normally it consumes less power than an LED light bulb, about
10W in fact, which would be hard to beat with any PC, and it has no
fans at all and is tiny.

It's not
difficult to assemble a quiet running SFF PC these days for just such a
function. Even a 2nd hand refurbished laptop with a USB DVB-T or T2
adapter or two plugged into it will be more than capable of functioning
as an effective Freeview PVR. :-)


It's not difficult but I wouldn't bother to do it again. I have a
couple of PVRs (two because when I acquired the new one for HD there
was still nothing wrong with the old one so no reason to discard it),
and as they both have simple editing facilities I normally use these
for anything with adverts because I can whittle them out, and the
Amazon box for BBC programmes. I also have several boxes of DVDs
recorded by one of the PVRs, which has this facility, but as I have
never watched most of them I gave up recording DVDs some time ago.

I think there comes a time when you have to take a look at the stuff
you are hoarding (in particular, recordings you never watch) and ask
yourself if you are really keeping it for any valid reason, and how
much of it will be of any interest to those who get to clear out your
belongings after you've gone. I just enjoy whatever's on the telly
that's worth enjoying (which is precious little of it these days), and
don't worry about preserving anything else that I probably wouldn't
have the time to watch anyway.

Rod.
  #28  
Old December 12th 16, 09:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default BBC late running

In message , Roderick
Stewart writes
On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 21:52:58 GMT, Paul Ratcliffe
wrote:

And despite the Xmas/Hogmanay issue of Radio Times being a two-week
one,

It only covers 17-30th... no New Year at all.


It's bloody ridiculous. It should be 24th Dec. to 6th Jan.


Digiguide is already showing details until 6th Jan.

I remember the good old days when, although BBC radio (and later, BBC
and ITV TV) had a few special programmes for Christmas, New Year was
virtually ignored.
--
Ian
  #29  
Old December 12th 16, 09:32 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default BBC late running

In message , Indy Jess John
writes
On 11/12/2016 21:57, Paul Ratcliffe wrote:
On Thu, 08 Dec 2016 08:03:21 +0000, Chris J Dixon
wrote:

Most nights BBC One's The One Show runs minutes early.

There is a clear and deliberate difference between published
schedule and actual working timings.


Only two minutes. The standard granularity virtually industry
wide is 5.


I am old enough to remember when the BBC used to show a clock on the
screen counting down the last few seconds and every programme started
*exactly* at the listed time. If there was a little time to fill, the
voice of a continuity announcer was broadcast alongside the clock.

Of course there was a down side. If a broadcast (most likely the news)
overran, it would be cut off so that the next one could start.

All programmes should be scheduled to end 5 minutes before the start of
the next one, and the Potter's Wheel used to fill in as required. The 5
minute gap will provide plenty of time to make a cup of tea, get another
beer, or have a pee.

--
Ian
  #30  
Old December 12th 16, 09:47 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,966
Default BBC late running

On Mon, 12 Dec 2016 10:32:11 +0000, Ian Jackson
wrote:

All programmes should be scheduled to end 5 minutes before the start of
the next one, and the Potter's Wheel used to fill in as required. The 5
minute gap will provide plenty of time to make a cup of tea, get another
beer, or have a pee.


Where's the petition...?

Rod.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2017 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.