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BBC late running



 
 
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  #11  
Old December 10th 16, 09:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 336
Default BBC late running

On Tue, 06 Dec 2016 19:18:11 +0000, Scott wrote:

Both BBC One and BBC Two were running two minutes late at 10 pm last
night. How could this happen?


Call that *late running*? That's actually normal start up timing (+/-2
minutes) practice by the Beeb ime over the past decade of my Freeview
recording scheduling history. :-)

I only regard a Beeb broadcast as "Late Running" when it starts eleven
or more minutes later than scheduled.

--
Johnny B Good
  #12  
Old December 10th 16, 09:57 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 336
Default BBC late running

On Thu, 08 Dec 2016 16:18:32 +0000, tim... wrote:

"Scott" wrote in message
news
Both BBC One and BBC Two were running two minutes late at 10 pm last
night. How could this happen?


It's normal for BBC2 to run 2-3 minutes late at 10pm. I reckon that it
does that 6 weekdays each week

A right PITA if I'm recording two programs from 9-10 and one from 10-11
getting the PVR to stop the BBC1 recording at 10 and not the BBC2
recording.

And a right PITA for me too until I discovered the joys of unfettered
scheduling of the Beeb's SD Freeview output over 18 months back when I
gave up the restrictions of my previous win2k/DTVR setup for a Linux Mint/
Kaffeine PVR 'solution' where there's simply no such thing as a padding
overlap conflict amongst every single single TV stream in any one
multiplex I happen to have a tuner available to capture the streams with.

--
Johnny B Good
  #13  
Old December 11th 16, 09:33 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
tim...[_2_]
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Posts: 319
Default BBC late running



"Johnny B Good" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 08 Dec 2016 16:18:32 +0000, tim... wrote:

"Scott" wrote in message
news
Both BBC One and BBC Two were running two minutes late at 10 pm last
night. How could this happen?


It's normal for BBC2 to run 2-3 minutes late at 10pm. I reckon that it
does that 6 weekdays each week

A right PITA if I'm recording two programs from 9-10 and one from 10-11
getting the PVR to stop the BBC1 recording at 10 and not the BBC2
recording.

And a right PITA for me too until I discovered the joys of unfettered
scheduling of the Beeb's SD Freeview output over 18 months back when I
gave up the restrictions of my previous win2k/DTVR setup for a Linux Mint/
Kaffeine PVR 'solution' where there's simply no such thing as a padding
overlap conflict amongst every single single TV stream in any one
multiplex I happen to have a tuner available to capture the streams with.


I assume that you have a PC hidden away in the corner, permanently hooked up
as a TV receiver

I prefer not to do that

or have I missed something

tim



--
Johnny B Good



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  #14  
Old December 11th 16, 10:36 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,126
Default BBC late running

In article , Chris J Dixon
wrote:

A bit like the way magazines keep moving the issue date earlier, so I'm
now reading PC Pro's February edition.


Cover dates like this are also to try and ensure the issue stays on the
shelves in Smugs, etc, and doesn't look 'out of date' to punters. Give the
impression it is 'new' for as long as possible.

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scot...o/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

  #15  
Old December 11th 16, 12:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 939
Default BBC late running

"Jim Lesurf" wrote in message
...
In article , Chris J Dixon
wrote:

A bit like the way magazines keep moving the issue date earlier, so I'm
now reading PC Pro's February edition.


Cover dates like this are also to try and ensure the issue stays on the
shelves in Smugs, etc, and doesn't look 'out of date' to punters. Give the
impression it is 'new' for as long as possible.


Coupled with the other bugbear: putting the issue date in very small print
in an obscure place on the front cover.

  #16  
Old December 11th 16, 03:58 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,126
Default BBC late running

In article , Martin
wrote:
Cover dates like this are also to try and ensure the issue stays on
the shelves in Smugs, etc, and doesn't look 'out of date' to punters.
Give the impression it is 'new' for as long as possible.


Coupled with the other bugbear: putting the issue date in very small
print in an obscure place on the front cover.


At one time Gardeners's World had problems because the month they
printed on the cover made the contents not topical.


To complicate things even more. the tendency seems to be to adopt having
*thirteen* issues per year with a 4-week production cycle. This means one
issue ends up with some name like 'mid-December' or 'Yearbook' issue. And
the day number of publication gets early as the months pass.

I first encountered this with USA mags many years ago. But it seems to have
crossed the pond and mags here now do it.

And despite the Xmas/Hogmanay issue of Radio Times being a two-week one,
the issues before it all get 'advanced' shelf dates. One of our local shops
this year had three successive issues on sale side by side a few days ago
to help customers avoid finding they'd missed one because they were caught
out.

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scot...o/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

  #18  
Old December 11th 16, 08:52 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,399
Default BBC late running

On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 19:53 +0000 (GMT Standard Time), Paul
Cummins wrote:

And despite the Xmas/Hogmanay issue of Radio Times being a two-week
one,


It only covers 17-30th... no New Year at all.


It's bloody ridiculous. It should be 24th Dec. to 6th Jan.
  #19  
Old December 11th 16, 08:57 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,399
Default BBC late running

On Thu, 08 Dec 2016 08:03:21 +0000, Chris J Dixon
wrote:

Most nights BBC One's The One Show runs minutes early.


There is a clear and deliberate difference between published
schedule and actual working timings.


Only two minutes. The standard granularity virtually industry
wide is 5.

I raised the matter on a visit to the BBC studio locally, where I
was actually able to sit in a control room and hear the network
give the countdown down the line, for The One Show, in compliance
with the printed running sheet in front of me, at 18:58. No
explanation was forthcoming.


How shall we say this politely? The people who run these
tours probably wouldn't have a clue.
But given the time you say you were there, it probably wasn't
one of those?

My belief is that starting early is a ploy intended to grab
audience at a programme junction by starting ahead of the other
channels.


In the aforementioned case, it's so they can shove in 90 seconds
worth of news at 19:58.
  #20  
Old December 12th 16, 02:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 336
Default BBC late running

On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 10:33:03 +0000, tim... wrote:

"Johnny B Good" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 08 Dec 2016 16:18:32 +0000, tim... wrote:

"Scott" wrote in message
news Both BBC One and BBC Two were running two minutes late at 10 pm last
night. How could this happen?

It's normal for BBC2 to run 2-3 minutes late at 10pm. I reckon that
it does that 6 weekdays each week

A right PITA if I'm recording two programs from 9-10 and one from
10-11 getting the PVR to stop the BBC1 recording at 10 and not the
BBC2 recording.

And a right PITA for me too until I discovered the joys of unfettered
scheduling of the Beeb's SD Freeview output over 18 months back when I
gave up the restrictions of my previous win2k/DTVR setup for a Linux
Mint/
Kaffeine PVR 'solution' where there's simply no such thing as a padding
overlap conflict amongst every single single TV stream in any one
multiplex I happen to have a tuner available to capture the streams
with.


I assume that you have a PC hidden away in the corner, permanently
hooked up as a TV receiver


Wrong assumption! I'm running this "PVR" operation on my 'office'
desktop machine. By 'office', I'm referring to a spare bedroom that was
used as my business office come workshop until a couple of years ago and
is now my 'Den' (or an 'in doors' shed if you prefer :-)


I prefer not to do that


I can understand such reluctance to use a desktop PC as a domestic PVR
since most tend to generate fan and hard drive noise and take up
considerably more room than a typical 'Shop Bought' PVR designed to
discretely rest on the shelf of a typical TV stand.

However, since all PVRs are essentially underpowered computers with
proprietary OS firmware, there's no reason not to build a small form
factor PC that can outdo the typical shop bought PVR for about the same
power consumption yet with far more cpu grunt even though it may contain
less processing power than a cheap entry level desktop machine. It's not
difficult to assemble a quiet running SFF PC these days for just such a
function. Even a 2nd hand refurbished laptop with a USB DVB-T or T2
adapter or two plugged into it will be more than capable of functioning
as an effective Freeview PVR. :-)

However (again!), I'm not too bothered about 'discreteness' so using my
desktop PC to archive BBC programmes onto my NAS box is my preferred
solution to both recording and watching 'Live' TV (I don't build *loud*
desktop PCs), especially as the setup allows me to watch programmes my
other half would not tolerate interfering with her daily soap operas,
"Strictly" (and other similar rubbish and 'Life Style' programming) she
just can't seem to manage without.

Our tastes in TV viewing have been so extremely polarised that even
twenty years ago, I was glad to be able to use the office PC just to
watch 'Live TV' in 'full frame' sans the gross over-scanning of a typical
domestic TV set (not record) using an analogue tuner adapter back in the
days when a much higher spec PC was needed to allow the privilege of
recording analogue TV broadcasts to a hard drive.


or have I missed something

Only the fact that I don't feel the need to 'hide the PC away in a
corner', it sits on my desk alongside the monitor I use as both a PC
monitor and "TV Screen".

Currently, it's recording "Monkey Planet" on BBC4 as I type this follow
up. Indeed, I see I have recorded 17 programmes during the past 12 hours
since yesterday afternoon. However, I see that two of them are duplicates
downloaded from the iplayer servers using get_iplayer which will be
supplemented by yet more iplayer content to replace most of the off-air
recordings (sadly, not everything the Beeb broadcasts is available from
their iplayer servers). Most of the content originates with BBC2 and BBC4
with the occasional contributions from BBC1 and CBBC.

As I previously mentioned, I don't have to consider scheduling or
padding conflicts so it's just a matter of scanning the epg from which to
build up a recording schedule with no more thought than to simply select
what I'd like to record. The issues of scheduling and padding clashes
simply don't exist! :-)

--
Johnny B Good
 




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