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I dislike ordering stuff that is not in stock



 
 
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  #31  
Old December 1st 16, 11:18 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver[_2_]
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Posts: 322
Default I dislike ordering stuff that is not in stock

On 01/12/2016 12:14, Martin wrote:
On Thu, 1 Dec 2016 11:50:26 -0000, "NY" wrote:

"Mark Carver" wrote in message
...
On 01/12/2016 11:18, Andy Burns wrote:
Ian Jackson wrote:

I have a tiny transformer which is 120V in, 6V
out. However, it is out of an aircraft, where the onboard 'mains' used
to be 600Hz. If I fed it with 120V 50Hz, there would be a big bang.

Not 400Hz?

Should be, yes.

Yonks ago I used my mains powered shaver on a plane, it didn't sound
happy, though it still did the job.


I'd have expected that sockets which were intended to be used by the public,
rather than for avionics etc, would be 60 Hz (or 50 Hz for 240 V) for that
very reason, even if it has to be generated by rotary converter or
rectifier/inverter from the plane's own 400 Hz supply.


I don't recall ever seeing a mains or any other power supply provided for
aircraft passengers.


It was 1989, and it was a knackered old 747 on BA.

You're right I've not seen the loos in recent years equipped with shaver
sockets, though of course USB and 110v sockets for lap tops are
fairly common (on seats in the pointy end)


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #32  
Old December 1st 16, 12:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_5_]
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Default I dislike ordering stuff that is not in stock

In message , Andy Burns
writes
Ian Jackson wrote:

I have a tiny transformer which is 120V in, 6V
out. However, it is out of an aircraft, where the onboard 'mains' used
to be 600Hz. If I fed it with 120V 50Hz, there would be a big bang.


Not 400Hz?

Well, certainly a lot higher than 50Hz!
--
Ian
  #34  
Old December 1st 16, 01:12 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
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Posts: 265
Default I dislike ordering stuff that is not in stock

On Thu, 1 Dec 2016 11:03:42 +0000
Ian Jackson wrote:
However, if you don't learn anything else about analogue, at least learn
Ohm's Law.


I knew Ohms law for DC, but I think its fair to say that for AC signals things
get much more complicated.

--
Spud

  #35  
Old December 2nd 16, 06:14 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,131
Default I dislike ordering stuff that is not in stock

On Thu, 1 Dec 2016 12:18:22 +0000, Mark Carver
wrote:

I don't recall ever seeing a mains or any other power supply provided for
aircraft passengers.


It was 1989, and it was a knackered old 747 on BA.

You're right I've not seen the loos in recent years equipped with shaver
sockets, though of course USB and 110v sockets for lap tops are
fairly common (on seats in the pointy end)


There would seem to be less of a need for that kind of thing now, with
more personal gadgets being battery powered with running times longer
than most journey times. Even some of the trains have 13A mains
sockets now, but for me it's not even worth the risk of trying them
out. The longest journey I make by train these days is about three
hours, and the gadget with the shortest running time (a laptop, if I
ever chose to use it on a train) will run for about five or six hours.
My phone can last a couple of days, and the Kindle several weeks. If
you travel a lot and need to use any gadgets while doing so, it's
easier to take your own power than rely on anyone else's.

Rod.
 




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