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[OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 19th 16, 04:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 380
Default [OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?

On Wed, 16 Nov 2016 15:53:55 +0000, Mr. Marmite wrote:

On Tue, 15 Nov 2016 15:53:23 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

snip


To answer your question, yes, there are dual and quad tuner DVB-T2
adapters (PCI and PCIe types) available if you search hard enough but
they're not exactly cheap[1]. I'll be needing two such tuners because
the BBC4 HD stream is on a seperate mux to the rest of the Beeb's HD
broadcast streams on Freeview (I only need a single tuner to capture all
of the BBC's SD streams using Kaffeine).

Thanks for the info.


You're most welcome. :-)

If I'd realised Kaffeine's abilities straight away, I'd have setup a
dedicated Linux box as a PVR a good three years ago. I just assumed it
would suffer the same one tuner per desired TV channel to be recorded
limitation with the various windows flavoured PVR/simple TV recording
software I'd trialled over the past decade.

I only discovered its excellent qualities quite by accident after
recording a couple of programmes from two different BBC TV channels
whilst Kaffeine had been running on "One Lung" due to an oversight in my
configuring that Kworld dual tuner DVB-T adapter. I already knew that
overlapped paddings didn't matter between back to back recordings on any
given TV channel (I just hadn't realised that this applied right across a
whole mux's worth of TV channel streams).

I was never impressed by any of the "Home Theatre" styled PVR software
(too damn cumbersome and a horrible Ten Foot Interface to make matters
even worse). In the end, I stuck with the recording software that had
been supplied with my single tuner DVB-T PCI adapter simply because it
proved to be the most reliable out of a bunch of similar offerings I'd
acquired with other adapters which had even worse issues (such as
selecting from the off-air epg resulting in a totally random programme
being selected).

The DVB Plus software package was chosen simply on account it was the
easiest one to manually set up a recording schedule with when you were
forced to enter the channel/start and run time manually from a web page
(Andrew Flegg's very fine Bleb.org website and the Beeb's own TV schedule
pages).

As far as BBC SD programme broadcasts are concerned, I only need a
single DVB-T tuner to capture whatever takes my fancy without any regard
to padding overlaps (globally set to 5 min start and 10 min end).
Scheduling recordings is simply a matter of looking through each
channel's EPG and selecting whatever programmes I wish to record over the
next 7 days or so. Such a far cry from the days of using DTVR out of the
DVB Plus suite of rubbish editing/processing utilities!!!


Eight DVB-T2 tuners suggests you're determined to archive the whole of
Freeview's broadcast streams (SD and HD) although the 'astro' part of
the 'Astrometa' name suggested the possibility that you were including
satellite broadcast sources (but googling shows it only does DVB-C/T/T2,
not S).

I archive a lot of films and TV, mostly from binary Usenet groups or
torrents, but the eight tuners in fact often becomes the equivalent of
four as I allow a two minute and five minute overlap at the beginning
and end of recordings.


When I got my first DVB-T adapter about 11 years ago now, a box slightly
bigger than a pack of 20 super-long cigarettes with a USB1 port. The
"USB2" reference on the packaging implied, rather misleadingly, that the
interface was the faster USB2 standard when, all along, they were simply
highlighting the bleedin' obvious fact that it could be plugged into
*any* USB2 port on account of the built in backwards compatibility with
the USB1 standard that was part of the USB2 spec. A prime example of
"Marketing" at its usual misleading best (phrase claims for the product
in such a way as to encourage the 'victim' (customer) to read more into
the blurb than is actually being claimed - caveat emptor and let the
Devil take the hindmost).

Anyway, grumble aside, I was able to take great joy in (at long last!)
being able to record off-air TV streams. My previous analogue TV tuner
adapters had been fine for watching TV programmes in *full frame* but
were a miserable failure as far as recordings went unless you'd spent a
small fortune on a high end adapter with its own on-the-fly compress to
MPG video hardware or else had a 10GB or larger HDD and a powerful CPU
when HDDs in typical use at that time had only just reached the 8GB mark.

The advent of Freeview was a Godsend as far as the PC enthusiasts who
looked on with envy at those able to afford high priced and overspecced
PCs needed to record analogue TV broadcasts with only a modicum of
bother. At last, the storage and processing requirements had been slashed
at a single stroke by virtue of the broadcasters doing all the hard work
for you. :-) Without built in hardware compression, an analogue system
needed to store about 1GB for each ten minute's worth of uncompressed
video (about 6GB per hour's worth of programme - a rather tall order for
entry level PCs of the day).

Once I started recording Freeview TV programmes, it swiftly turned into
a bit of an obsession which was only kept in check (even when recruiting
a laptop as a recording schedule conflict resolver) by the limitations of
one tuner per programme and no overlapping paddings allowed.

Going over to Linux and Kaffeine last year opened my eyes to a totally
new world of recording Freeview broadcasts. The transition was, as I've
previously described it, rather like being released from a straitjacket.
Now I was genuinely able to record more TV than I could watch 'Live' as
DTVR had more or less obliged me to do.

It wasn't so much a gathering of even more programmes to add to my
collection so much as to grab the repeats in order to choose the least
end credit vandalised airings. To this end, I was able to really go OTT
compared to what had gone before.

Since I recently started getting to grips with "Get_iplayer" around
about 3 or 4 weeks ago, my off-air recording activity is now mostly to
provide a safety net to guard against any problems with iplayer sourced
material and to capture those programmes that, rather curiously, aren't
available for later viewing with iplayer (pretty well all those classic
sitcoms being aired early to mid afternoon by BBC2 - Some Mothers..., Hi
de Hi, Open All Hours and so on). Consequently, the need to record
'endless repeats' has now largely evaporated (If I've already got an
iplayer sourced recording, typically, but not always, in 1280 by 720
"HD", I know there's nothing to be gained by recording yet another repeat
showing of the programme in SD quality. TBH, I'm still learning to adjust
to this novel state of affairs.


JOOI, can you record all TV streams in a single mux using WMC and
DVBViewer? I know some folk have used VLC in windows to capture the full
mux data stream from which they can later hive off individual channel
streams in a post processing exercise which seems as close to Kaffeine's
ability to record each TV stream to seperate files without regard to
padding overlap conflicts with back to back programmes across the whole
mux. Scheduling conflicts in Kaffeine only arise when you don't have
enough tuners to cover programmes being aired simultaneously on
different muxes.

DVBViewer will record a complete mux but WMC won't. I tried doing this
for a while but found that separating and editing the different programs
that I wanted to archive took so long that it was easier to just record
the programs individually.


Recording a whole mux at a time for later slicing and dicing of the
individual TV channel streams does have the charm that there's no need to
use padding to guard against scheduling tomfoolery. The idea of
recording each 24 hour day's worth from each and every Freeview mux might
seem like a neat way to "Have your cake and eat it" (never miss a raved
about programme you forgot to add to the schedule being the most
attractive aspect) but, as you've discovered, this can lumber you with a
lot of 'hard work' in the post processing of those data streams.

Using Kaffeine allows me to achieve the same end result without the need
to sift out programme streams from a full mux's worth of a data stream
file. Whatever I select from the epg gets its own individual file
(sometimes even in duplicate on those occasions when I've not noticed the
duplicate entry due to an edit of a programme's epg entry by the
broadcaster and I've effectively selected both, each with the same start
and end times!).

Indeed, on those rare occasions where the duplication has been the
result of the running order of two back to back programmes being switched
around, I've simply selected all four epg entries to save me the bother
of trying to work out the truth of the matter. I simply delete the
incorrectly named versions afterwards in a "Shoot first, ask questions
later." mode of operation. I know that if they're both half or one hour
programmes that have been swapped around, I could simply record each one
without duplication and sort out any renaming that might arise afterwards
but, quite simply, renaming is more work than simply deleting the surplus
duplicates. :-)

--
Johnny B Good
  #12  
Old November 20th 16, 01:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,007
Default [OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?

"Mr. Marmite" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 05:26:08 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

big snip of interesting material

Indeed, on those rare occasions where the duplication has been the
result of the running order of two back to back programmes being switched
around, I've simply selected all four epg entries to save me the bother
of trying to work out the truth of the matter. I simply delete the
incorrectly named versions afterwards in a "Shoot first, ask questions
later." mode of operation. I know that if they're both half or one hour
programmes that have been swapped around, I could simply record each one
without duplication and sort out any renaming that might arise afterwards
but, quite simply, renaming is more work than simply deleting the surplus
duplicates. :-)

You make a compelling case for Kaffeine but I'm afraid I've been Windows
only since 1992 and just can't summon up the energy to master yet another
OS. I used the old (sadly now defunct) Nebula software and hardware for
years when transitioning from a VCR to a computer-based system of
recording
TV but have for the last ten years or so found WMC and DVBViewer more than
adequate for this purpose. Just wish I could sort out the Win 10 quirk of
not allowing more than ten or so USB connections...


Yes I couldn't be arsed learning the intricacies of other OS (eg Mac or
UNIX), together with having to keep *two* PCs permanently on: the Windows
one that I use for everything else and the Linux PVR PC.

I have Windows 7 on my PCs and nothing will induce me to downgrade (as I see
it!) to Win 8 or Win 10. I use Windows Media Centre (WMC) to schedule
recordings and save them to "library" HDDs on this PC. I back up those
recordings to an external HDD. I also run Plex Server on this PC so we can
watch the recordings on the TV downstairs via the Roku box which has a Plex
client.

I top-and-tail and edit recordings using VideoRedo to take out adverts and
continuity announcements.

If I am ever forced to change to Win 10 (from which MS have perversely
removed WMC), I'll probably have to become familiar with third-party PVR
software such as NextPVR. NextPVR may have a strange user interface, but it
does have the advantage that it can make multiple simultaneous recordings
from the same multiplex, which WMC can't do. If I install more than one
DVB-T2 adaptor I'd be able to make simultaneous/overlapping recordings from
*different* multiplexes. Shame that most file formats can't save the
metadata (episode name, plot summary) in the recording file, as you can with
WMC's WTV format, but instead have to save it as a separate XML file which
then needs to be copied with the recording (eg TS format).


For watching recordings I tend to use the same "PVR" PC (when not using the
TV downstairs) and use VLC because of its ability to play back at faster
than real time.

  #13  
Old November 20th 16, 01:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 840
Default [OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?

"Martin" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 13:51:06 +0000, Mr. Marmite wrote:

snip
Just wish I could sort out the Win 10 quirk of
not allowing more than ten or so USB connections...


The limit seems to depend among other things on whether you are using USB 3 or
USB 2
https://plugable.com/2015/09/08/not-...ler-resources/


On a slightly different but related point, is there any easy way to distinguish
easily between USB2 and USB3 ports? I think I'm supposed to have some of each but I
don't know which is which.

  #14  
Old November 20th 16, 02:35 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 840
Default [OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?

"brightside S9" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 14:38:02 -0000, "Norman Wells"
wrote:

"Martin" wrote in message
. ..
On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 13:51:06 +0000, Mr. Marmite wrote:

snip
Just wish I could sort out the Win 10 quirk of
not allowing more than ten or so USB connections...

The limit seems to depend among other things on whether you are using USB 3 or
USB 2
https://plugable.com/2015/09/08/not-...ler-resources/


On a slightly different but related point, is there any easy way to distinguish
easily between USB2 and USB3 ports? I think I'm supposed to have some of each but
I
don't know which is which.


USB2 has 4 connections and USB3 has 6 connections in plug. USB3 is
also colored blue in plug. (All this refers to USB Typ A plugs /
connectors). Look here
http://static.diffen.com/uploadz/c/c...Connectors.jpg


Thanks for that - never realised the colour difference was significant before!

  #15  
Old November 20th 16, 03:44 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,966
Default [OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?

On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 16:48:29 +0100, Martin wrote:

If I am ever forced to change to Win 10 (from which MS have perversely
removed WMC),


Only 3 and a bit years away from end of MS extended support of Win7.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...cle-fact-sheet

My wife uses Win10 without problems. I can even cope with Win10 Insider. Aren't
you a bit young to give up learning new things?


Back everything up, take a deep breath and go for it. It's not as bad
as you think. As long as you do a clean install (rather than an
upgrade), switch off all the "send info to Microsoft" functions as you
go, only use a local account and remove that annoying Cortana thing,
you'll end up with something that looks like Windows 7 but with
sharper corners. And they won't stop supporting it in 2020.

Rod.
  #16  
Old November 20th 16, 04:48 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,007
Default [OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?

"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 16:48:29 +0100, Martin wrote:

If I am ever forced to change to Win 10 (from which MS have perversely
removed WMC),


Only 3 and a bit years away from end of MS extended support of Win7.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...cle-fact-sheet

My wife uses Win10 without problems. I can even cope with Win10 Insider.
Aren't
you a bit young to give up learning new things?


Back everything up, take a deep breath and go for it. It's not as bad
as you think. As long as you do a clean install (rather than an
upgrade), switch off all the "send info to Microsoft" functions as you
go, only use a local account and remove that annoying Cortana thing,
you'll end up with something that looks like Windows 7 but with
sharper corners. And they won't stop supporting it in 2020.


And install ClassicShell or something similar to give a Windows 7-like start
menu. And create a quick-start menu on the taskbar and use this to launch
apps, so as to links to potential apps and actual running apps as two
distinct things.

Change the default apps for common file extensions so as to launch old-style
apps instead of "Modern" or "Metro" apps.

Learn the important keyboard shotcuts:

Alt-F4 to exit an app

Windows-R to open up the Run dialogue (for things like Control Panel or
CMD). OK, real Control Panel, as opposed to Settings, is on the Classic
Shell start menu.

Use Windows Live Mail or Thunderbird or webmail - anything except the Metro
app Windows Mail which is a bit useless.


I've got a spare PC that I upgraded to Win 10. I need to get it out and
start using it to get used to its quirks and to find out what else to
customise to make its UI more like Win 7.


I'm not too old to learn new things. I just don't like having to do it.
Software development should only ever add new features and never remove old
features or ways of doing things. Compatibility and evolution are better
than revolution and re-learning. I wonder why MS took the conscious decision
to remove Windows Media Centre (as a means of scheduling and recording TV
programmes, as opposed to displaying them for which you can use Windows
Media Player, VLC or whatever).

  #17  
Old November 21st 16, 04:14 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 380
Default [OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?

On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 13:51:06 +0000, Mr. Marmite wrote:

On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 05:26:08 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

big snip of interesting material

Indeed, on those rare occasions where the duplication has been the
result of the running order of two back to back programmes being
switched around, I've simply selected all four epg entries to save me
the bother of trying to work out the truth of the matter. I simply
delete the incorrectly named versions afterwards in a "Shoot first, ask
questions later." mode of operation. I know that if they're both half or
one hour programmes that have been swapped around, I could simply record
each one without duplication and sort out any renaming that might arise
afterwards but, quite simply, renaming is more work than simply deleting
the surplus duplicates. :-)

You make a compelling case for Kaffeine but I'm afraid I've been Windows
only since 1992 and just can't summon up the energy to master yet
another OS. I used the old (sadly now defunct) Nebula software and
hardware for years when transitioning from a VCR to a computer-based
system of recording TV but have for the last ten years or so found WMC
and DVBViewer more than adequate for this purpose. Just wish I could
sort out the Win 10 quirk of not allowing more than ten or so USB
connections...


I can understand your reluctance over learning a completely alien OS.
Even the modern Linux distros designed to mitigate the shock of the new
by using a desktop UI not too far removed from the windows XP and Vista
experience is still a major step change - and, unfortunately, not all for
the better, discounting of course this latest sick puppy of Microsoft's,
Windows 10, which I'm happy to say I've only had vicarious experience of
courtesy of the alt.comp.os.windows-10 newsgroup.

Up until April last year, I was a reasonably 'Happy Camper' with my much
cherished win2k machine until I wanted to upgrade the main components
(MoBo, CPU and RAM) when I knew win2k was going to get sidelined through
lack of driver support and the limitations imposed by a 32bit OS.

I rather thought I'd just scraped through under the wire with my last
major hardware upgrade 5 years earlier so had already started taking
steps towards gaining more experience and familiarity with Linux to
prepare for the inevitable day when I'd be forced to upgrade to a 64bit
OS. I'd been observing (and repairing) winXP. Vista, win7 and win8
flavours of win2k's successors with an increasingly jaundiced eye.

It seemed to me that Microsoft were playing 'Mind Games' with their
captive market. Windows 10 proved to be the final straw in persuading me
that I'd be seriously much better off booting into a unix based distro
(Linux isn't the only game in town) rather than any of Microsoft's
successors to win2k. Even with the prep work during the preceding years,
it proved a bit of a wrench to make the break but reading all the tales
of woe and anguish in the a.c.o.w-10 newsgroup during the last 18 months
or so provided all the motivation I needed (and then some!) to stick with
Linux Mint 17 and adapt.

What helps in making the transition is the use of Oracle's VirtualBox
virtualisation software to create a virtualised instance or three of your
favourite versions of windows so you can carry on using any 'essential'
windows only software that can't be replaced by a satisfactory Linux
alternative. In my case, I'm using a winXP guest VM to run Mpegstreamclip
to top and tail and convert the m2t transport stream files created by
Kaffeine into mpg programme stream files.

Initially, the processing ran at only a quarter of the speed that it
used to on the previous hardware setup under win2k. This proved to be due
to my relying on Vbox file shares to give the guest VM access to the
files stored on the Linux host's mounted file system. The key to success
in this case proved to be a case of creating virtual disk volumes of
100GB on each of the two HDDs which could be mounted by the guest exactly
like the primary, bootable virtual hard drives required for each guest VM.

The idea of using two such virtual disk drives each on a seperate
physical disk was to eliminate head contention and the Vbox file sharing
overhead. It did the trick since the actual processing is now about 3
times faster than it used to in the previous win2k setup (which wasn't
too shabby a spec at the time - dual core 3.1GHz Phenom with 3GB ddr2
ram, an SSD and a couple of HDDs compared to the current 3.8GHz clocked
quad core AMD FX4300 cpu and 8GB of ddr3 ram.

I still have to move the media files via the Vbox shares to queue the mt2
files into the source drive folder and transfer the results from the
output drive's folder back to the host OS file system but this is a fire
and forget batch process of a matter of minutes which saves me having to
wait over 3 minutes per half hour's worth of programme material to be
processed by Mpegstreamclip for each mt2 file that needs to be converted
and topped and tailed, a process where I spend some time setting up the
in and out points before hitting the 'save 'button to start each
conversion job, time where I land up 'twiddling my thumbs' until I can
deal with the next job.

It had been bad enough when this thumb twiddling time had been half a
minute per 29 minute's worth of programme let alone now having to wait 3
1/2 minutes before I could deal with the next job. The extra 5 minutes or
so transferring the files onto the virtual disk drive prior to working on
each individual mt2 file was an excellent investment in that a 29 minute
programme now gets processed in around 10 to 12 seconds, barely enough
time to take a drag on an E-Ciggy before checking the result with
mediaplayer (mainly the last few seconds to verify I've not included
unwanted material after the end credits have run to completion) before
dealing with the next file. I usually process a day's worth of recordings
at a time and transcode the mpegs into more compact h.264 MKV files
afterwards using Handbrake in the host OS before moving them into storage
on the 17TB NAS box for later viewing at my leisure.

Since I discovered the delights of get_iplayer[1] about a month back, I
don't process anywhere near the same amount of material this way these
days. The downloaded iplayer sourced files are all .ts files which I
transcode directly to mkv type using Handbrake. The files don't have any
start or end paddings to be trimmed off like the off-air m2t recordings
do making the processing task a lot simpler.

Processing these .ts files takes just over twice as long as the mpg
files on account most of them are 1280 by 720 HD versus 720 by 576 SD or
smaller in the case of the off-air derived mpg files. It's a swings and
roundabouts situation. The .ts files take longer to transcode but I avoid
several intermediate steps required to convert Kaffeine's m2t files into
topped and tailed mpg files before transcoding them.

Before I started routinely downloading media files off the Beeb's iplayer
servers[2], I had a well oiled routine to deal with Kaffeine's
recordings. Now I'm using a different, not quite so well oiled routine
for processing the HD .ts files but I seem to have reached a stage where
I'm a lot more relaxed over the business of "Archiving the BBC". :-)

[1] You can download a windows installable version of Get_iplayer which
might solve most of your scheduling conflicts if you have a decent enough
uncapped broadband connection. You can always schedule a batch of
downloads during the off-peak times of the day (typically midnight to 8
or 9 am depending on how your ISP's traffic management policy is
implemented)

[2] My original motivation for using get_iplayer was purely to retrieve
the odd programme that I'd failed to record using Kaffeine for one reason
or another, mostly due to "BBC scheduling ****tery" for want of a better
descriptive phrase, but occasionally due to an oversight on my part.

When I realised that most of the material I was downloading was in 1280
by 720 HD rather than 720 by 576 SD and mostly free of end credit
vandalism that so often afflicted the off-air recordings, I decided to
make this my primary source and relegate Kaffeine to recording the
programmes as a safety backstop to cover iplayer availability
shortcomings.

The only minor downside when it comes to BBC1 and BBC2 aired programmes
is the presence of the BBC DOG in the top left corner of the picture
which is absent from these two channels' output. However, it seems a
small trade off against the improved definition and a significant
reduction in the amount of continuity end credit vandalism that so often
afflicts the Freeview broadcasts.

--
Johnny B Good
  #18  
Old November 21st 16, 08:39 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 840
Default [OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?

"Johnny B Good" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 13:51:06 +0000, Mr. Marmite wrote:
On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 05:26:08 GMT, Johnny B Good
wrote:

big snip of interesting material

Indeed, on those rare occasions where the duplication has been the
result of the running order of two back to back programmes being
switched around, I've simply selected all four epg entries to save me
the bother of trying to work out the truth of the matter. I simply
delete the incorrectly named versions afterwards in a "Shoot first, ask
questions later." mode of operation. I know that if they're both half or
one hour programmes that have been swapped around, I could simply record
each one without duplication and sort out any renaming that might arise
afterwards but, quite simply, renaming is more work than simply deleting
the surplus duplicates. :-)

You make a compelling case for Kaffeine but I'm afraid I've been Windows
only since 1992 and just can't summon up the energy to master yet
another OS. I used the old (sadly now defunct) Nebula software and
hardware for years when transitioning from a VCR to a computer-based
system of recording TV but have for the last ten years or so found WMC
and DVBViewer more than adequate for this purpose. Just wish I could
sort out the Win 10 quirk of not allowing more than ten or so USB
connections...


I can understand your reluctance over learning a completely alien OS.
Even the modern Linux distros designed to mitigate the shock of the new
by using a desktop UI not too far removed from the windows XP and Vista
experience is still a major step change - and, unfortunately, not all for
the better, discounting of course this latest sick puppy of Microsoft's,
Windows 10, which I'm happy to say I've only had vicarious experience of
courtesy of the alt.comp.os.windows-10 newsgroup.

Up until April last year, I was a reasonably 'Happy Camper' with my much
cherished win2k machine until I wanted to upgrade the main components
(MoBo, CPU and RAM) when I knew win2k was going to get sidelined through
lack of driver support and the limitations imposed by a 32bit OS.

I rather thought I'd just scraped through under the wire with my last
major hardware upgrade 5 years earlier so had already started taking
steps towards gaining more experience and familiarity with Linux to
prepare for the inevitable day when I'd be forced to upgrade to a 64bit
OS. I'd been observing (and repairing) winXP. Vista, win7 and win8
flavours of win2k's successors with an increasingly jaundiced eye.

It seemed to me that Microsoft were playing 'Mind Games' with their
captive market. Windows 10 proved to be the final straw in persuading me
that I'd be seriously much better off booting into a unix based distro
(Linux isn't the only game in town) rather than any of Microsoft's
successors to win2k. Even with the prep work during the preceding years,
it proved a bit of a wrench to make the break but reading all the tales
of woe and anguish in the a.c.o.w-10 newsgroup during the last 18 months
or so provided all the motivation I needed (and then some!) to stick with
Linux Mint 17 and adapt.

What helps in making the transition is the use of Oracle's VirtualBox
virtualisation software to create a virtualised instance or three of your
favourite versions of windows so you can carry on using any 'essential'
windows only software that can't be replaced by a satisfactory Linux
alternative. In my case, I'm using a winXP guest VM to run Mpegstreamclip
to top and tail and convert the m2t transport stream files created by
Kaffeine into mpg programme stream files.

Initially, the processing ran at only a quarter of the speed that it
used to on the previous hardware setup under win2k. This proved to be due
to my relying on Vbox file shares to give the guest VM access to the
files stored on the Linux host's mounted file system. The key to success
in this case proved to be a case of creating virtual disk volumes of
100GB on each of the two HDDs which could be mounted by the guest exactly
like the primary, bootable virtual hard drives required for each guest VM.

The idea of using two such virtual disk drives each on a seperate
physical disk was to eliminate head contention and the Vbox file sharing
overhead. It did the trick since the actual processing is now about 3
times faster than it used to in the previous win2k setup (which wasn't
too shabby a spec at the time - dual core 3.1GHz Phenom with 3GB ddr2
ram, an SSD and a couple of HDDs compared to the current 3.8GHz clocked
quad core AMD FX4300 cpu and 8GB of ddr3 ram.

I still have to move the media files via the Vbox shares to queue the mt2
files into the source drive folder and transfer the results from the
output drive's folder back to the host OS file system but this is a fire
and forget batch process of a matter of minutes which saves me having to
wait over 3 minutes per half hour's worth of programme material to be
processed by Mpegstreamclip for each mt2 file that needs to be converted
and topped and tailed, a process where I spend some time setting up the
in and out points before hitting the 'save 'button to start each
conversion job, time where I land up 'twiddling my thumbs' until I can
deal with the next job.

It had been bad enough when this thumb twiddling time had been half a
minute per 29 minute's worth of programme let alone now having to wait 3
1/2 minutes before I could deal with the next job. The extra 5 minutes or
so transferring the files onto the virtual disk drive prior to working on
each individual mt2 file was an excellent investment in that a 29 minute
programme now gets processed in around 10 to 12 seconds, barely enough
time to take a drag on an E-Ciggy before checking the result with
mediaplayer (mainly the last few seconds to verify I've not included
unwanted material after the end credits have run to completion) before
dealing with the next file. I usually process a day's worth of recordings
at a time and transcode the mpegs into more compact h.264 MKV files
afterwards using Handbrake in the host OS before moving them into storage
on the 17TB NAS box for later viewing at my leisure.

Since I discovered the delights of get_iplayer[1] about a month back, I
don't process anywhere near the same amount of material this way these
days. The downloaded iplayer sourced files are all .ts files which I
transcode directly to mkv type using Handbrake. The files don't have any
start or end paddings to be trimmed off like the off-air m2t recordings
do making the processing task a lot simpler.

Processing these .ts files takes just over twice as long as the mpg
files on account most of them are 1280 by 720 HD versus 720 by 576 SD or
smaller in the case of the off-air derived mpg files. It's a swings and
roundabouts situation. The .ts files take longer to transcode but I avoid
several intermediate steps required to convert Kaffeine's m2t files into
topped and tailed mpg files before transcoding them.

Before I started routinely downloading media files off the Beeb's iplayer
servers[2], I had a well oiled routine to deal with Kaffeine's
recordings. Now I'm using a different, not quite so well oiled routine
for processing the HD .ts files but I seem to have reached a stage where
I'm a lot more relaxed over the business of "Archiving the BBC". :-)

[1] You can download a windows installable version of Get_iplayer which
might solve most of your scheduling conflicts if you have a decent enough
uncapped broadband connection. You can always schedule a batch of
downloads during the off-peak times of the day (typically midnight to 8
or 9 am depending on how your ISP's traffic management policy is
implemented)

[2] My original motivation for using get_iplayer was purely to retrieve
the odd programme that I'd failed to record using Kaffeine for one reason
or another, mostly due to "BBC scheduling ****tery" for want of a better
descriptive phrase, but occasionally due to an oversight on my part.

When I realised that most of the material I was downloading was in 1280
by 720 HD rather than 720 by 576 SD and mostly free of end credit
vandalism that so often afflicted the off-air recordings, I decided to
make this my primary source and relegate Kaffeine to recording the
programmes as a safety backstop to cover iplayer availability
shortcomings.

The only minor downside when it comes to BBC1 and BBC2 aired programmes
is the presence of the BBC DOG in the top left corner of the picture
which is absent from these two channels' output. However, it seems a
small trade off against the improved definition and a significant
reduction in the amount of continuity end credit vandalism that so often
afflicts the Freeview broadcasts.


But what did you do after your coffee break?

  #19  
Old November 21st 16, 11:03 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,966
Default [OT] Is anyone using kaffeine 2?

On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 17:48:22 -0000, "NY" wrote:

My wife uses Win10 without problems. I can even cope with Win10 Insider.
Aren't
you a bit young to give up learning new things?


Back everything up, take a deep breath and go for it. It's not as bad
as you think. As long as you do a clean install (rather than an
upgrade), switch off all the "send info to Microsoft" functions as you
go, only use a local account and remove that annoying Cortana thing,
you'll end up with something that looks like Windows 7 but with
sharper corners. And they won't stop supporting it in 2020.


And install ClassicShell or something similar to give a Windows 7-like start
menu. And create a quick-start menu on the taskbar and use this to launch
apps, so as to links to potential apps and actual running apps as two
distinct things.

Change the default apps for common file extensions so as to launch old-style
apps instead of "Modern" or "Metro" apps.

Learn the important keyboard shotcuts:


Most of the keyboard shortcuts are the same as they've always been
(and many of them are the same in Linux too). The last Microsoft
application I recall using was a copy of Word that came installed on a
laptop in 2001, but since then I've aimed to be OS-agnostic by using
multiplatform applications as much as possible, Firefox, Libre Office,
Gimp, VLC, Stellarium, for example, and of course anything web-based,
will run on anything. By adopting this philosophy I hope to be always
using the latest and best supported version of whatever is available
without having to care too much about what it is. I don't have to
re-learn how to write every time I pick up a different brand of biro,
so it makes no sense to be tied to the specific features of one type
of computer system.

Rod.
 




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