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This week's silly question - working hours 9 AM - 5 PM



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 1st 16, 07:53 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Vir Campestris
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Posts: 346
Default This week's silly question - working hours 9 AM - 5 PM

On 01/11/2016 16:43, NY wrote:
Except... it wasn't always the case :-) Until the 1700s, a date in the
middle of March was deemed to be the start of the new year


Tax year. April 5th. Another hangover from then... and wonkipedia
suggests 1600s.

Andy
  #12  
Old November 1st 16, 08:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 959
Default This week's silly question - working hours 9 AM - 5 PM

"Vir Campestris" wrote in message
...
On 01/11/2016 16:43, NY wrote:
Except... it wasn't always the case :-) Until the 1700s, a date in the
middle of March was deemed to be the start of the new year


Tax year. April 5th. Another hangover from then... and wonkipedia suggests
1600s.


Are the tax year (5 April) and the old-style new year's day (24 March)
actually related?

The article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_St...ew_Style_dates says
that the changeover occurred in England and Wales in 1752; Scotland changed
in 1600.

There are implied references to the difference between the Julian and
Gregorian calendars being 14 days (23 Sep Julian = 6 Dec Gregorian) by 1907
(see the illustration of the marriage certificate). This does not explain
the much larger difference between 1 Jan and 24 Mar, which is 31+28+24=83
days.

So the fact that new-year's day used to be 24 March cannot be ascribed
(solely) to the error between Julian and Gregorian calendars.

The mystery continues...

  #13  
Old November 1st 16, 09:36 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_5_]
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Posts: 42
Default This week's silly question - working hours 9 AM - 5 PM

In message , Roger Mills
writes



That said, many countries which are close to the equator - on either
side - don't bother with daylight saving time because their hours of
daylight don't vary much throughout the year.


And when night falls, it falls exceedingly quickly. There is little time
for "Roamin' In The Gloamin'".
--
Ian
  #14  
Old November 2nd 16, 06:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John J Armstrong
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Posts: 71
Default This week's silly question - working hours 9 AM - 5 PM

On Tue, 1 Nov 2016 21:39:17 -0000, "NY" wrote:

"Vir Campestris" wrote in message
...
On 01/11/2016 16:43, NY wrote:
Except... it wasn't always the case :-) Until the 1700s, a date in the
middle of March was deemed to be the start of the new year


Tax year. April 5th. Another hangover from then... and wonkipedia suggests
1600s.


Are the tax year (5 April) and the old-style new year's day (24 March)
actually related?

The article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_St...ew_Style_dates says
that the changeover occurred in England and Wales in 1752; Scotland changed
in 1600.

There are implied references to the difference between the Julian and
Gregorian calendars being 14 days (23 Sep Julian = 6 Dec Gregorian) by 1907
(see the illustration of the marriage certificate). This does not explain
the much larger difference between 1 Jan and 24 Mar, which is 31+28+24=83
days.

So the fact that new-year's day used to be 24 March cannot be ascribed
(solely) to the error between Julian and Gregorian calendars.

The mystery continues...


There's quite a good explanation he

https://www.taxadvisorypartnership.c...ril-each-year/
  #17  
Old November 2nd 16, 08:31 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,370
Default This week's silly question - working hours 9 AM - 5 PM

It does not work in a linear fashion at each end of the day. The hours slide
around the clock as well as shorten and lengthen, so its not as simple as
the plan you have and the more north or south you go the worse it gets.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"NY" wrote in message
o.uk...
With the clocks going back last weekend and everyone moaning about how
dark it was driving home in the evening, I started to think.

Why is it that the hours of the traditional office working day, 9 AM to 5
PM, were chosen to be asymmetric about noon? If they'd chosen 8 to 4
instead, the mornings and evenings would get dark equally - assuming that
12 noon is the point when the sun is highest in the sky.

I realise that many people in manual jobs traditionally worked shifts
which were very different from 9-5.


I often think it would be so much easier if all countries in the world
decided to adjust their clocks by half an hour (GMT+30m for northern
hemisphere; GMT-30m for southern hemisphere, plus the normal
one-hour-per-15-degrees correction for longitude) so as to observe a time
half-way between winter and summer time, and then stayed like that all
year round.



  #18  
Old November 2nd 16, 12:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roger Mills[_2_]
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Posts: 256
Default This week's silly question - working hours 9 AM - 5 PM

On 01/11/2016 18:27, NY wrote:
"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...
On 01/11/2016 11:13, NY wrote:
I often think it would be so much easier if all countries in the world
decided to adjust their clocks by half an hour (GMT+30m for northern
hemisphere; GMT-30m for southern hemisphere, plus the normal
one-hour-per-15-degrees correction for longitude) so as to observe a
time half-way between winter and summer time, and then stayed like that
all year round.


Why -30m for the southern hemisphere. Surely they do the same as us -
and use 'natural' time in the winter and advance by an hour to
'daylight saving time' in the summer. So it would need to be +30m if
they were to split the difference.


I'd have thought that the summer-time offset would need to be in the
opposite direction in the southern hemisphere to give the same benefit
(lighter mornings or lighter evenings) as in the northern hemispheres,
with the start/end dates being 3 months before and 4 months after 21
December (their midsummer's day) rather than with respect to 21 June
(our midsummer's day).


I don't follow your logic! They go for lighter evenings in their summer,
just as we do in ours. They put their clocks *forward* just as we do.
What difference does being in the southern hemisphere make - apart from
the 6 month shift in the seasons? The earth still revolves in the same
direction!

I'm shortly off to Sydney (Australia). They are naturally about 10 hours
ahead of GMT, and that is the situation during their winter. But because
we are on BST in their winter, the difference reduces to 9 hours. Then,
at about the same time that we revert to BST, they go onto Daylight
Saving Time - so the difference is then 11 hours.
--
Cheers,
Roger
____________
Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
checked.
  #19  
Old November 2nd 16, 01:04 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 959
Default This week's silly question - working hours 9 AM - 5 PM

"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...
On 01/11/2016 18:27, NY wrote:
"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...
On 01/11/2016 11:13, NY wrote:
I often think it would be so much easier if all countries in the world
decided to adjust their clocks by half an hour (GMT+30m for northern
hemisphere; GMT-30m for southern hemisphere, plus the normal
one-hour-per-15-degrees correction for longitude) so as to observe a
time half-way between winter and summer time, and then stayed like that
all year round.

Why -30m for the southern hemisphere. Surely they do the same as us -
and use 'natural' time in the winter and advance by an hour to
'daylight saving time' in the summer. So it would need to be +30m if
they were to split the difference.


I'd have thought that the summer-time offset would need to be in the
opposite direction in the southern hemisphere to give the same benefit
(lighter mornings or lighter evenings) as in the northern hemispheres,
with the start/end dates being 3 months before and 4 months after 21
December (their midsummer's day) rather than with respect to 21 June
(our midsummer's day).


I don't follow your logic! They go for lighter evenings in their summer,
just as we do in ours. They put their clocks *forward* just as we do. What
difference does being in the southern hemisphere make - apart from the 6
month shift in the seasons? The earth still revolves in the same
direction!

I'm shortly off to Sydney (Australia). They are naturally about 10 hours
ahead of GMT, and that is the situation during their winter. But because
we are on BST in their winter, the difference reduces to 9 hours. Then, at
about the same time that we revert to BST, they go onto Daylight Saving
Time - so the difference is then 11 hours.


You're probably right. My brain hurts thinking about it. I suspect my
reasons for saying that the shift is in the opposite direction are of the
"it stands to reason" gut-instinct bull****ting type, and I need to think it
through more carefully and logically :-)

I presume I'm right about the changeover dates being 6 months different from
in the northern hemisphere, assuming that they change roughly the same
number of days before and after mid-summer's day, given that their summer is
6 months away from ours.


OK, so maybe all countries (northern and southern hemisphere) should decide
to adopt a time 30 minutes ahead of winter time (ie GMT + 30 mins for UK)
and then stick to that all year round, so as to have a good compromise
without the hassle of two clock changes every year.

I can vaguely remember the all-year round summer time (GMT+1) in the late
60s. I hadn't realised that it was for three years (1968-1971) and thought
it was just for one year (maybe 1968). I can remember all the schoolchildren
(I was 5 in 1968) being given reflective arm-bands and strips to attach to
their satchels so they could be seen when they were walking to/from school
in the dark - especially when crossing the road.

  #20  
Old November 2nd 16, 02:24 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
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Posts: 2,156
Default This week's silly question - working hours 9 AM - 5 PM

On Wed, 2 Nov 2016 14:04:48 -0000
"NY" wrote:

I can vaguely remember the all-year round summer time (GMT+1) in the
late 60s. I hadn't realised that it was for three years (1968-1971)
and thought it was just for one year (maybe 1968).


I remember it, and the collective amazement when it finished and every
one wondered why it was said to have been a failure, when almost
everyone was happy with it.

--
Davey.
 




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