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Oh dear me



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 13th 16, 12:08 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Phi
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Posts: 245
Default Oh dear me

The BBC fell 10m short of the amount of money required to keep The Great
British Bake Off, BBC News understands.

The corporation is thought to have offered 15m per year to keep the
programme on the BBC.

That would have been double the amount the BBC currently pays for the show
and its sister programmes such as An Extra Slice and the Sport Relief
specials.

But it is understood Love Productions refused to entertain any offers below
25m per year.

'Huge investment'
The show has now been bought by Channel 4, who will begin airing the
programme in 2017, starting with a celebrity special in aid of Stand Up To
Cancer.

Channel 4 is understood to have offered more money for the brand following a
breakdown in negotiations between Love Productions and the BBC. Both
companies have been asked to comment on the amount paid to acquire the show.

Love Productions said negotiations with the BBC had been taking place for a
year, with a last-ditch meeting on Monday.

BBC media correspondent David Sillito said negotiations with the show's
presenters and judges - Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins, Mary Berry and Paul
Hollywood - have yet to begin.

A spokesman for Channel 4 said: "We would be delighted if the presenters and
judges want to come to Channel 4."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-37349837

  #2  
Old September 13th 16, 12:59 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,024
Default Oh dear me

"Phi" wrote in message
...
The BBC fell 10m short of the amount of money required to keep The Great
British Bake Off, BBC News understands.

The corporation is thought to have offered 15m per year to keep the
programme on the BBC.

That would have been double the amount the BBC currently pays for the show
and its sister programmes such as An Extra Slice and the Sport Relief
specials.

But it is understood Love Productions refused to entertain any offers
below 25m per year.


This is a consequence of having programmes made by independent (non-BBC,
non-ITV, non-CH4) company which retains the rights to the format of the
programme. The production company can sell their product to the
highest-bidding distributor. Looks as if BBC need to to tighten up their
legal agreements for formats to programmes - assuming that they (and not the
independent programme maker) has the original creative idea for the format.

  #3  
Old September 13th 16, 01:47 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Phi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 245
Default Oh dear me


"NY" wrote in message
...
"Phi" wrote in message
...
The BBC fell �10m short of the amount of money required to keep The Great
British Bake Off, BBC News understands.

The corporation is thought to have offered �15m per year to keep the
programme on the BBC.

That would have been double the amount the BBC currently pays for the
show and its sister programmes such as An Extra Slice and the Sport
Relief specials.

But it is understood Love Productions refused to entertain any offers
below �25m per year.


This is a consequence of having programmes made by independent (non-BBC,
non-ITV, non-CH4) company which retains the rights to the format of the
programme. The production company can sell their product to the
highest-bidding distributor. Looks as if BBC need to to tighten up their
legal agreements for formats to programmes - assuming that they (and not
the independent programme maker) has the original creative idea for the
format.


Yes, I was thinking that the farming out of programme making is not cost
effective.

  #4  
Old September 13th 16, 06:42 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,570
Default Oh dear me

You know what. I've never watched it or the come dancing or any of the other
rather odd format shows like sewing etc
I've said this before, but we have done to death decorating property make
overs, and really I think food now. Whatever is next?
Dressmaking perhaps?
There are not that many artisan type things left are there?

We have to admit it. There are too many channels with ridiculous time
wasting things on them that have no real value as far as I can see. The
celebrity culture seems to be hopefully drawing to a close again in favour
orf what?
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Phi" wrote in message
...
The BBC fell 10m short of the amount of money required to keep The Great
British Bake Off, BBC News understands.

The corporation is thought to have offered 15m per year to keep the
programme on the BBC.

That would have been double the amount the BBC currently pays for the show
and its sister programmes such as An Extra Slice and the Sport Relief
specials.

But it is understood Love Productions refused to entertain any offers
below 25m per year.

'Huge investment'
The show has now been bought by Channel 4, who will begin airing the
programme in 2017, starting with a celebrity special in aid of Stand Up To
Cancer.

Channel 4 is understood to have offered more money for the brand following
a breakdown in negotiations between Love Productions and the BBC. Both
companies have been asked to comment on the amount paid to acquire the
show.

Love Productions said negotiations with the BBC had been taking place for
a year, with a last-ditch meeting on Monday.

BBC media correspondent David Sillito said negotiations with the show's
presenters and judges - Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins, Mary Berry and Paul
Hollywood - have yet to begin.

A spokesman for Channel 4 said: "We would be delighted if the presenters
and judges want to come to Channel 4."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-37349837



  #5  
Old September 13th 16, 06:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,570
Default Oh dear me

Don't know but from what I've found out I'm very surprised it did not end up
on Sky as the Murdoch empire has quite a stake in that company. Wheels turn
in strange ways.

Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"NY" wrote in message
...
"Phi" wrote in message
...
The BBC fell 10m short of the amount of money required to keep The Great
British Bake Off, BBC News understands.

The corporation is thought to have offered 15m per year to keep the
programme on the BBC.

That would have been double the amount the BBC currently pays for the
show and its sister programmes such as An Extra Slice and the Sport
Relief specials.

But it is understood Love Productions refused to entertain any offers
below 25m per year.


This is a consequence of having programmes made by independent (non-BBC,
non-ITV, non-CH4) company which retains the rights to the format of the
programme. The production company can sell their product to the
highest-bidding distributor. Looks as if BBC need to to tighten up their
legal agreements for formats to programmes - assuming that they (and not
the independent programme maker) has the original creative idea for the
format.



  #6  
Old September 13th 16, 08:15 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dickie mint[_2_]
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Posts: 248
Default Oh dear me

On 13/09/2016 19:43, Brian Gaff wrote:
Don't know but from what I've found out I'm very surprised it did not end up
on Sky as the Murdoch empire has quite a stake in that company. Wheels turn
in strange ways.

Brian

Gleaned from the many reports on the interweb.
sky owns 70% of Love Productions. LP sold the format to the beeb.
  #8  
Old September 14th 16, 01:06 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Peter Duncanson
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Posts: 4,190
Default Oh dear me

On Tue, 13 Sep 2016 13:08:09 +0100, "Phi" wrote:

The BBC fell 10m short of the amount of money required to keep The Great
British Bake Off, BBC News understands.

The corporation is thought to have offered 15m per year to keep the
programme on the BBC.

That would have been double the amount the BBC currently pays for the show
and its sister programmes such as An Extra Slice and the Sport Relief
specials.

But it is understood Love Productions refused to entertain any offers below
25m per year.

'Huge investment'
The show has now been bought by Channel 4, who will begin airing the
programme in 2017, starting with a celebrity special in aid of Stand Up To
Cancer.

Channel 4 is understood to have offered more money for the brand following a
breakdown in negotiations between Love Productions and the BBC. Both
companies have been asked to comment on the amount paid to acquire the show.

Love Productions said negotiations with the BBC had been taking place for a
year, with a last-ditch meeting on Monday.

BBC media correspondent David Sillito said negotiations with the show's
presenters and judges - Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins, Mary Berry and Paul
Hollywood - have yet to begin.

A spokesman for Channel 4 said: "We would be delighted if the presenters and
judges want to come to Channel 4."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-37349837


It looks as though new presenters will be needed:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-37355065

Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc will step down as hosts of The Great
British Bake Off when it moves to Channel 4.

The duo have fronted the show since it began on BBC Two in 2010,
alongside judges Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood.

They said in a statement: "We made no secret of our desire for the
show to remain where it was... we're not going with the dough."

And possibly new experts/judges:
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-en...-a7289696.html

The last 24 hours in the world of televised baking competitions can
best be described as utter, unbridled chaos.

Following news The Great British Bake Off would be moving from its
ancestral home (of 7 series) at the BBC to Channel 4, things have
been falling apart with lightning speed: from rumours that the BBC
fell 10 million short of what makers Love Productions demanded, the
swift departure of hosts Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc, and panicked
concern as to what would happen to the show in its cross-channel
transfer.?

Indeed, Mel and Sue's departure has struck a particular blow for
Channel 4's hopes to continue the success of the UK's most-watched
programme of 2015, but the pair were adament in their loyalty to the
BBC; releasing a statement which noted, "The BBC nurtured the show
from its infancy and helped give it its distinctive warmth and
charm, growing it from an audience of two million to nearly 15
million at its peak."

It's now expected baking experts Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry may
be following in Mel and Sue's foosteps, as a source told The Sun:
"Mary and Paul believe the show works because of Mel and Sue. It's
always been the four of them together. They are all really close and
constantly hang out together in between filming."

"They repeatedly talk about how they are a family and they both
credit the show's success down to Mel and Sue as well as the
format," they continued: "Paul is currently in LA and hasn't had a
chance to talk to Mary. But they have always said they are in it
together."

--
Peter Duncanson
(in uk.tech.digital-tv)
  #9  
Old September 14th 16, 01:15 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,003
Default Oh dear me

On Tue, 13 Sep 2016 19:42:01 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

We have to admit it. There are too many channels with ridiculous time
wasting things on them that have no real value as far as I can see. The
celebrity culture seems to be hopefully drawing to a close again in favour
orf what?
Brian


Conventional broadcasting is probably stuck forever in a morass of
regulations and traditional procedures that would make it impossible
for them to broadcast anything really meaningful without elaborate
legal disclaimers, "don't try this at home" warnings, and expensive
insurance against having to issue grovelling apologies to people who
claim to be offended by something. Broadcasting has probably had its
day as a useful medium that can actually say things. The internet is
the future. Don't ever expect to see broadcast equivalents of, for
example, "colinfurze" or "photonicinduction" or "electroboom".

q.v. as they say.

Rod.
  #10  
Old September 14th 16, 02:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,024
Default Oh dear me

"Peter Duncanson" wrote in message
...
It looks as though new presenters will be needed:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-37355065

Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc will step down as hosts of The Great
British Bake Off when it moves to Channel 4.

The duo have fronted the show since it began on BBC Two in 2010,
alongside judges Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood.

They said in a statement: "We made no secret of our desire for the
show to remain where it was... we're not going with the dough."

And possibly new experts/judges:
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-en...-a7289696.html

It's now expected baking experts Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry may
be following in Mel and Sue's foosteps, as a source told The Sun:
"Mary and Paul believe the show works because of Mel and Sue. It's
always been the four of them together. They are all really close and
constantly hang out together in between filming."

"They repeatedly talk about how they are a family and they both
credit the show's success down to Mel and Sue as well as the
format," they continued: "Paul is currently in LA and hasn't had a
chance to talk to Mary. But they have always said they are in it
together."


I presume the price that CH4 paid was dependent on how much of the existing
programme and presenters they had acquired. If they paid on the assumption
that Mel, Sue, Mary and Paul would be part of the deal, and have now
discovered that they won't get them, it makes it a very pyrrhic victory.
*Surely* their legal team checked that before bidding...

 




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