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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

with regard to tv licence



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 4th 16, 10:23 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 6,678
Default with regard to tv licence

On the bbc I player it seems a bit pointless to just ask if you have a
licence and ticking yes allows you to watch stuff. Who is going to click no,
honestly?
Brian

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  #2  
Old September 4th 16, 10:50 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 457
Default with regard to tv licence

On Sunday, 4 September 2016 11:23:18 UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:
On the bbc I player it seems a bit pointless to just ask if you have a
licence and ticking yes allows you to watch stuff. Who is going to click no,
honestly?
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!


Er someone over 75?
Someone under 16.
Anyone under 10.
Diplomats.
Someone (e.g. a foreigner) staying in a hotel.
  #3  
Old September 4th 16, 10:58 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy Burns[_12_]
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Posts: 299
Default with regard to tv licence

Brian Gaff wrote:

On the bbc I player it seems a bit pointless to just ask if you have a
licence and ticking yes allows you to watch stuff.


I suspect it's about incriminating yourself if they can later catch you.

  #4  
Old September 4th 16, 10:58 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
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Posts: 2,193
Default with regard to tv licence

On Sun, 4 Sep 2016 03:50:18 -0700 (PDT)
"R. Mark Clayton" wrote:

On Sunday, 4 September 2016 11:23:18 UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:
On the bbc I player it seems a bit pointless to just ask if you
have a licence and ticking yes allows you to watch stuff. Who is
going to click no, honestly?
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!


Er someone over 75?
Someone under 16.
Anyone under 10.
Diplomats.
Someone (e.g. a foreigner) staying in a hotel.


So what happens then? They don't have access to iPlayer?

--
Davey.
  #5  
Old September 4th 16, 11:07 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Robin[_8_]
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Posts: 428
Default with regard to tv licence

On 04/09/2016 11:50, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Sunday, 4 September 2016 11:23:18 UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:
On the bbc I player it seems a bit pointless to just ask if you have a
licence and ticking yes allows you to watch stuff. Who is going to click no,
honestly?
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!


Er someone over 75?

People over 75 are not exempt from the legislation on TV licences. They
just have the option of a free licence.

Diplomats.


Diplomats are not exempt but the licensing law cannot be enforced
against them. (And I can't see why you think TV licensing might be any
different from - say - speeding or rape.)



--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid
  #6  
Old September 4th 16, 11:14 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
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Posts: 4,153
Default with regard to tv licence

In article , Andy Burns
wrote:
Brian Gaff wrote:


On the bbc I player it seems a bit pointless to just ask if you have a
licence and ticking yes allows you to watch stuff.


I suspect it's about incriminating yourself if they can later catch you.


I assume it is simply to draw the attention of people to the (relatively
new) fact that a licence is now required unless you are covered by a
specific exemption. But I use gip, so haven't seen it.

Jim

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  #7  
Old September 4th 16, 11:15 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,074
Default with regard to tv licence

On Sun, 4 Sep 2016 11:23:16 +0100, "Brian Gaff"
wrote:

On the bbc I player it seems a bit pointless to just ask if you have a
licence and ticking yes allows you to watch stuff. Who is going to click no,
honestly?


It seems about as effective as the screen that asks if you're over 16,
which you simply say yes to if you want to watch the programme. I
might as well put a sign on my front door saying "Are you a burglar?
If yes, go away, if no, come in it's not locked".

It's pointless pretending to make a selection like this unless it's
accompanied by some genuine method of control, though it's difficult
to imagine how they could implement any such thing for broadcasts,
considering the amount of equipment already in existence that has no
provision for it and would probably be rendered useless.

Rod.
  #8  
Old September 4th 16, 11:27 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,074
Default with regard to tv licence

On Sun, 4 Sep 2016 12:07:55 +0100, Robin wrote:

People over 75 are not exempt from the legislation on TV licences. They
just have the option of a free licence.


Doesn't that make them exempt from the *relevance* of the legislation,
which in practice amounts to the same thing?

It would be the same as saying that I'm not exempt from the laws about
smoking in enclosed public spaces, even though I've never smoked.
Theoretically the law bans me from doing this, but in reality it
doesn't need to as I have, in a sense, already banned myself. This
particular law therefore has no effect on me, which is another way of
saying it doesn't apply, even though, academically speaking, you might
say that it does.

Rod.
  #9  
Old September 4th 16, 11:37 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 457
Default with regard to tv licence

On Sunday, 4 September 2016 12:08:02 UTC+1, Robin wrote:
On 04/09/2016 11:50, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Sunday, 4 September 2016 11:23:18 UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:
On the bbc I player it seems a bit pointless to just ask if you have a
licence and ticking yes allows you to watch stuff. Who is going to click no,
honestly?
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!


Er someone over 75?

People over 75 are not exempt from the legislation on TV licences. They
just have the option of a free licence.

Diplomats.


Diplomats are not exempt but the licensing law cannot be enforced
against them. (And I can't see why you think TV licensing might be any
different from - say - speeding or rape.)


Because it applies to premises, not personal conduct outside the mission.

I suppose the BBC could say they can't do it because embassies are legally viewed as foreign territory.




--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid


  #10  
Old September 4th 16, 12:19 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Max Demian
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Posts: 3,767
Default with regard to tv licence

On Sun, 04 Sep 2016 13:59:06 +0200, Martin wrote:
On Sun, 4 Sep 2016 04:37:36 -0700 (PDT), "R. Mark Clayton"
wrote:


People over 75 are not exempt from the legislation on TV

licences. They
just have the option of a free licence.

Diplomats.

Diplomats are not exempt but the licensing law cannot be

enforced
against them. (And I can't see why you think TV licensing might

be any
different from - say - speeding or rape.)


Because it applies to premises, not personal conduct outside the

mission.

I suppose the BBC could say they can't do it because embassies are

legally viewed as foreign territory.

Yeah but - the BBC blocks users from accessing iPlayer TV from

those located in
foreign territories


Perhaps all embassies should be enclosed by a Faraday cage.

--
Max Demian
 




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