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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Crackdown on tv pirate devices



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 28th 16, 07:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Aloysius
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

'Police in Scotland say they are conducting the world's biggest 'pirate
box' crackdown. Together with the Federation Against Copyright Theft,
police are targeting sellers of Android-style set-top boxes and believe
that thousands of pubs could be customers. In addition, three torrent
sites have been closed down.'


https://torrentfreak.com/police-cond...ckdown-160528/
  #2  
Old May 29th 16, 11:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,210
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

On Sat, 28 May 2016 19:39:47 +0100, Aloysius
wrote:

'Police in Scotland say they are conducting the world's biggest 'pirate
box' crackdown. Together with the Federation Against Copyright Theft,
police are targeting sellers of Android-style set-top boxes and believe
that thousands of pubs could be customers. In addition, three torrent
sites have been closed down.'


https://torrentfreak.com/police-cond...ckdown-160528/


The description is all a bit vague about exactly what's illegal about
these boxes and how we're supposed to know. Lots of perfectly
respectable companies sell "Android-style set-top boxes". I bought one
myself, from Amazon. Are we not supposed to use them? How are we
supposed to tell the difference between an "Android-style set-top box"
and a "pirate device"?

Rod.
  #3  
Old May 29th 16, 04:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Adrian Caspersz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 280
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

On 29/05/16 11:34, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Sat, 28 May 2016 19:39:47 +0100, Aloysius
wrote:

'Police in Scotland say they are conducting the world's biggest 'pirate
box' crackdown. Together with the Federation Against Copyright Theft,
police are targeting sellers of Android-style set-top boxes and believe
that thousands of pubs could be customers. In addition, three torrent
sites have been closed down.'


https://torrentfreak.com/police-cond...ckdown-160528/


The description is all a bit vague about exactly what's illegal about
these boxes and how we're supposed to know. Lots of perfectly
respectable companies sell "Android-style set-top boxes". I bought one
myself, from Amazon. Are we not supposed to use them? How are we
supposed to tell the difference between an "Android-style set-top box"
and a "pirate device"?


Depends what video addons Kodi has been preconfigured with by these pirates.

From Kodi's facebook page

"There is a growing (and worrying) misconception caused by some websites
and people who sell HTPC devices with XBMC pre-installed. These often
contain add-ons from we which we would like to clearly distance
ourselves, and for which we will not offer support of any kind. We will
not call these add-ons by name.

However if it all seems to be good to be true like watching content
(movies and tvshows) for free, you should start asking yourself if this
can still be considered legal. In some countries it can be considered
clearly illegal.
It a regretful development that in our eyes, the most awesome media
centre there is, is clouded by such a development. These few people are
giving and spreading a misconception of what XBMC is and stands for, and
are giving it a bad name. We would like to remind everyone that XBMC
should be seen as a media centre platform for which you provide your own
media.

Hopefully we can break this tide and restore and improve our good name
that we worked so hard for. As always the only and official news and
XBMC versions can be found at from http://xbmc.org/about/ Please help us
and spread the word of the true purpose of XBMC. Thank you."

--
Adrian C
  #4  
Old May 30th 16, 09:33 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,210
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

On Sun, 29 May 2016 16:32:57 +0100, Adrian Caspersz
wrote:
[...]
However if it all seems to be good to be true like watching content
(movies and tvshows) for free, you should start asking yourself if this
can still be considered legal. In some countries it can be considered
clearly illegal.


Unfortunately it's no good asking *yourself* what's legal, because
your own answer would probably be based on logic and commonsense, and
the law in this area is far from clear and certainly not logical. What
you consider legal and what some powerful vested interest considers
legal may not be the same thing.

That's before also considering the fact that the material you're
watching or listening to may originate in a different country, where
the laws may be different. If it's possible to perform an action which
is perfectly legal in one country that produces an effect in another,
where it may not be, then which country's laws apply?

Receiving material from round the world on a computer seems no
different from receiving it on a radio or TV set. It feels to me like
the modern equivalent of DX reception, which was never beset by any
problems other than the technical ones related to the actual
reception. I never heard of anyone being prevented from listening to
broadcasts that somebody didn't want them to hear. At least not
outside TV and movie dramas depicting life in occupied countries
during the war. In real life, you could just hook up an aerial and
listen to whatever you could find, without anyone telling you not to.
If something was being broadcast it was there for the taking.

Rod.
  #5  
Old May 30th 16, 10:05 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,047
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

And how long do they think that will last before they are back?
Not that I condone making money from piracy, but sometimes the law
enforcement folk cannot see the pointlessness of their efforts.
Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Aloysius" wrote in message
...
'Police in Scotland say they are conducting the world's biggest 'pirate
box' crackdown. Together with the Federation Against Copyright Theft,
police are targeting sellers of Android-style set-top boxes and believe
that thousands of pubs could be customers. In addition, three torrent
sites have been closed down.'


https://torrentfreak.com/police-cond...ckdown-160528/


  #6  
Old May 30th 16, 10:08 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,047
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

Except nobody would want them if they only handled legal content, would
they?

Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Adrian Caspersz" wrote in message
...
On 29/05/16 11:34, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Sat, 28 May 2016 19:39:47 +0100, Aloysius
wrote:

'Police in Scotland say they are conducting the world's biggest 'pirate
box' crackdown. Together with the Federation Against Copyright Theft,
police are targeting sellers of Android-style set-top boxes and believe
that thousands of pubs could be customers. In addition, three torrent
sites have been closed down.'


https://torrentfreak.com/police-cond...ckdown-160528/

The description is all a bit vague about exactly what's illegal about
these boxes and how we're supposed to know. Lots of perfectly
respectable companies sell "Android-style set-top boxes". I bought one
myself, from Amazon. Are we not supposed to use them? How are we
supposed to tell the difference between an "Android-style set-top box"
and a "pirate device"?


Depends what video addons Kodi has been preconfigured with by these
pirates.

From Kodi's facebook page

"There is a growing (and worrying) misconception caused by some websites
and people who sell HTPC devices with XBMC pre-installed. These often
contain add-ons from we which we would like to clearly distance ourselves,
and for which we will not offer support of any kind. We will not call
these add-ons by name.

However if it all seems to be good to be true like watching content
(movies and tvshows) for free, you should start asking yourself if this
can still be considered legal. In some countries it can be considered
clearly illegal.
It a regretful development that in our eyes, the most awesome media centre
there is, is clouded by such a development. These few people are giving
and spreading a misconception of what XBMC is and stands for, and are
giving it a bad name. We would like to remind everyone that XBMC should be
seen as a media centre platform for which you provide your own media.

Hopefully we can break this tide and restore and improve our good name
that we worked so hard for. As always the only and official news and XBMC
versions can be found at from http://xbmc.org/about/ Please help us and
spread the word of the true purpose of XBMC. Thank you."

--
Adrian C



  #7  
Old May 30th 16, 10:13 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,047
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

Yes, but there were jamming stations of course. There still is this problem
where you are not supposed to use information gained by listening to air
traffic control or whatever else you can find.
Really the problem is that globalisation may well be here in many respects,
but the problem of deals in one country and not another screw this up
completely.
They should encrypt it if they don't want anybody to see it. The decrypting
and sending over the web from inside the country with the local deal is
where the prosecutions should be done, not on the hapless user who is not a
lawyer nor really cares or needs to care about the legality aspect of
something they can buy legally. Look at multi region DVD players as an
example.

Brian

--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please!
"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 29 May 2016 16:32:57 +0100, Adrian Caspersz
wrote:
[...]
However if it all seems to be good to be true like watching content
(movies and tvshows) for free, you should start asking yourself if this
can still be considered legal. In some countries it can be considered
clearly illegal.


Unfortunately it's no good asking *yourself* what's legal, because
your own answer would probably be based on logic and commonsense, and
the law in this area is far from clear and certainly not logical. What
you consider legal and what some powerful vested interest considers
legal may not be the same thing.

That's before also considering the fact that the material you're
watching or listening to may originate in a different country, where
the laws may be different. If it's possible to perform an action which
is perfectly legal in one country that produces an effect in another,
where it may not be, then which country's laws apply?

Receiving material from round the world on a computer seems no
different from receiving it on a radio or TV set. It feels to me like
the modern equivalent of DX reception, which was never beset by any
problems other than the technical ones related to the actual
reception. I never heard of anyone being prevented from listening to
broadcasts that somebody didn't want them to hear. At least not
outside TV and movie dramas depicting life in occupied countries
during the war. In real life, you could just hook up an aerial and
listen to whatever you could find, without anyone telling you not to.
If something was being broadcast it was there for the taking.

Rod.



  #8  
Old June 2nd 16, 05:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew Rowland[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

On Sunday, 29 May 2016 11:34:28 UTC+1, Roderick Stewart wrote:

The description is all a bit vague about exactly what's illegal about
these boxes and how we're supposed to know. Lots of perfectly
respectable companies sell "Android-style set-top boxes". I bought one
myself, from Amazon. Are we not supposed to use them? How are we
supposed to tell the difference between an "Android-style set-top box"
and a "pirate device"?

Rod.

The policeman was dumbing down like mad, or the reporter dumbed down. It is the emsoftware/em that is illegal, not the boxes, and AFAIK it is only illegal to sell these boxes, not to buy them. I have certainly only seen reports of Sky going after sellers, not their customers. (See links in this: http://helpforum.sky.com/t5/Archived...t/td-p/1499847)
It certainly doesn't apply to mainstream brands like Amazon Fire Sticks/boxes, Roku, Now TV etc. It would apply to many of the cheap Chinese boxes you get on eBay & Amazon Market, though whether it is worth any publisher's while trying to go after sellers abroad is moot.
If you download copyright material then you are open to prosecution for that, but again, my understanding is that viewing pirated films via streaming, without making a permanent copy, is not illegal -- though that loophole may get closed. See https://gigaom.com/2014/06/05/you-ca...p-court-rules/
  #9  
Old December 24th 17, 10:57 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andrew Rowland[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

On Thursday, 2 June 2016 17:30:16 UTC+1, Andrew Rowland wrote:
On Sunday, 29 May 2016 11:34:28 UTC+1, Roderick Stewart wrote:

The description is all a bit vague about exactly what's illegal about
these boxes and how we're supposed to know. Lots of perfectly
respectable companies sell "Android-style set-top boxes". I bought one
myself, from Amazon. Are we not supposed to use them? How are we
supposed to tell the difference between an "Android-style set-top box"
and a "pirate device"?

Rod.

The policeman was dumbing down like mad, or the reporter dumbed down. It is the emsoftware/em that is illegal, not the boxes, and AFAIK it is only illegal to sell these boxes, not to buy them. I have certainly only seen reports of Sky going after sellers, not their customers. (See links in this: http://helpforum.sky.com/t5/Archived...t/td-p/1499847)
It certainly doesn't apply to mainstream brands like Amazon Fire Sticks/boxes, Roku, Now TV etc. It would apply to many of the cheap Chinese boxes you get on eBay & Amazon Market, though whether it is worth any publisher's while trying to go after sellers abroad is moot.
If you download copyright material then you are open to prosecution for that, but again, my understanding is that viewing pirated films via streaming, without making a permanent copy, is not illegal -- though that loophole may get closed. See https://gigaom.com/2014/06/05/you-ca...p-court-rules/


Recent court cases have shown that it is illegal to circumvent encryption in order to avoid paying a subscription or fee.
  #10  
Old December 24th 17, 12:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
The Other John[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 62
Default Crackdown on tv pirate devices

On Sun, 24 Dec 2017 02:57:57 -0800, Andrew Rowland wrote:

On Thursday, 2 June 2016 17:30:16 UTC+1, Andrew Rowland wrote:


It took you 18 months to finish your post - what were you doing? Watching
pirate TV?

--
TOJ.
 




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