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What units?



 
 
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  #61  
Old July 27th 15, 06:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jaffna Dog
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Posts: 17
Default What units?

On Thursday, 23 July 2015 09:56:55 UTC+1, NY wrote:
"Mark Carver" wrote in message
...
On 21/07/2015 09:21, Indy Jess John wrote:


The only disadvantage with kilometre as a word is that it has four syllables
and is a bit of a mouthful - in colloquial parlance I tend to abbreviate it
to K.

Maybe the metric system needs special single-syllable words for
commonly-used multiples like kilometre and kilogramme.


There already are - 'kilo' for kilogram, and you can use 'klick' for kilometre or kilometres per hour, this term isn't in common use but it was used by the Americans in Vietnam.


  #62  
Old July 28th 15, 04:24 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 478
Default What units?

On Mon, 27 Jul 2015 10:39:40 -0700, Jaffna Dog wrote:

On Thursday, 23 July 2015 09:56:55 UTC+1, NY wrote:
"Mark Carver" wrote in message
...
On 21/07/2015 09:21, Indy Jess John wrote:


The only disadvantage with kilometre as a word is that it has four
syllables and is a bit of a mouthful - in colloquial parlance I tend to
abbreviate it to K.

Maybe the metric system needs special single-syllable words for
commonly-used multiples like kilometre and kilogramme.


There already are - 'kilo' for kilogram, and you can use 'klick' for
kilometre or kilometres per hour, this term isn't in common use but it
was used by the Americans in Vietnam.


And, also in some of the Science fiction stories I read which may, or
may not, have pre-dated that conflict. It's quite likely that its use in
either the conflict or the Sci-Fi genre was the inspiration for its use
in the other.

--
Johnny B Good
  #63  
Old July 28th 15, 08:42 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David Kennedy[_2_]
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Posts: 424
Default What units?

On 24/07/2015 04:35, Johnny B Good wrote:

My abiding memory of pre-decimilasation petroleum pricing was also 4/11
a gallon. I may be wrong but ISTR that decimilasation was used as an
excuse to apply a price hike to take it up to the full "Five Bob", i.e. a
full 25 pence for a gallon (BTW, a price of only 5.5p a litre!).

And 'metrication' was a further excuse to whack up prices.

--
David Kennedy

http://www.anindianinexile.com
  #64  
Old July 28th 15, 08:44 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David Kennedy[_2_]
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Posts: 424
Default What units?

On 23/07/2015 22:00, Ashley Booth wrote:

Why didn't they wait for all the old people to die before bringing in
decimalisation?

A better plan would be to wait until all the politicians were dead.

--
David Kennedy

http://www.anindianinexile.com
  #65  
Old July 28th 15, 08:46 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David Kennedy[_2_]
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Posts: 424
Default What units?

On 24/07/2015 12:40, Peter Duncanson wrote:

The crown coin is now 5 pounds.


What do they know?

--
David Kennedy

http://www.anindianinexile.com
  #66  
Old July 28th 15, 11:08 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
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Posts: 2,294
Default What units?

On Tue, 28 Jul 2015 08:42:49 +0100
David Kennedy wrote:

On 24/07/2015 04:35, Johnny B Good wrote:

My abiding memory of pre-decimilasation petroleum pricing was
also 4/11 a gallon. I may be wrong but ISTR that decimilasation was
used as an excuse to apply a price hike to take it up to the full
"Five Bob", i.e. a full 25 pence for a gallon (BTW, a price of only
5.5p a litre!).

And 'metrication' was a further excuse to whack up prices.


See my comment elsewhere on 'metrifuction'. A perfect example of the
breed.

--
Davey.
  #67  
Old July 28th 15, 04:06 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
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Posts: 9,381
Default What units?

Davey wrote:
On Tue, 28 Jul 2015 08:42:49 +0100
David Kennedy wrote:

On 24/07/2015 04:35, Johnny B Good wrote:
My abiding memory of pre-decimilasation petroleum pricing was
also 4/11 a gallon. I may be wrong but ISTR that decimilasation was
used as an excuse to apply a price hike to take it up to the full
"Five Bob", i.e. a full 25 pence for a gallon (BTW, a price of only
5.5p a litre!).

And 'metrication' was a further excuse to whack up prices.


See my comment elsewhere on 'metrifuction'. A perfect example of the
breed.


I was teaching in a Yorkshire mining village junior school. I don't need
to say it was rough because all mining villages are rough. Dinner money
was 1/9d a day, or 8/9d per week. On D Day we had to charge 9p per day
or 44p per week. But five nines are 45. This meant that the kids who
paid by the day were a penny down at the end of the week. Of course
these were the kids whose parents were feckless and spent up on booze
and fags all the time, and couldn't organise themselves to give the kid
8/9d each Monday. These people were the ones who never showed up at open
day. They were known to the Labour council of Doncaster as the
'oppressed poor', despite the fact that the genuinely badly off got free
dinners anyway. Clearly a massive injustice was taking place. We were
ordered to keep a separate ledger showing which kids had bought five
consecutive dinners day by day. These kids were ceremonially given a new
penny on Friday afternoon. There was a bit of a barney in the council
about whether non-consecutive runs of five dinners, or five dinners
spanning two weeks, should also get the penny, but this idea fell by the
wayside. "We have to draw the line somewhere!" declared Councillor
Coalminer, in an unusual fit of right wing parsimony.

At the start of the Autumn Term before D Day every school were sent a
large amount of pretend New Money, made from plastic. Children were
encouraged to take it home to educate their grandmas and grandads.
Unfortunately many kids and adults thought it was the real thing so it
had all disappeared within a fortnight.

Bill
  #68  
Old July 28th 15, 04:56 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Posts: 1,260
Default What units?

"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
I was teaching in a Yorkshire mining village junior school. I don't need
to say it was rough because all mining villages are rough. Dinner money
was 1/9d a day, or 8/9d per week. On D Day we had to charge 9p per day or
44p per week. But five nines are 45. This meant that the kids who paid by
the day were a penny down at the end of the week. Of course these were the
kids whose parents were feckless and spent up on booze and fags all the
time, and couldn't organise themselves to give the kid 8/9d each Monday.
These people were the ones who never showed up at open day. They were
known to the Labour council of Doncaster as the 'oppressed poor', despite
the fact that the genuinely badly off got free dinners anyway. Clearly a
massive injustice was taking place. We were ordered to keep a separate
ledger showing which kids had bought five consecutive dinners day by day.
These kids were ceremonially given a new penny on Friday afternoon. There
was a bit of a barney in the council about whether non-consecutive runs of
five dinners, or five dinners spanning two weeks, should also get the
penny, but this idea fell by the wayside. "We have to draw the line
somewhere!" declared Councillor Coalminer, in an unusual fit of right wing
parsimony.


I'm surprised that the school allowed people who paid daily rather than
weekly to benefit from the discount if they bought five consecutive days'
dinners. Good that they allowed this.

At the start of the Autumn Term before D Day every school were sent a
large amount of pretend New Money, made from plastic. Children were
encouraged to take it home to educate their grandmas and grandads.
Unfortunately many kids and adults thought it was the real thing so it had
all disappeared within a fortnight.


I remember the plastic coins. I also remember that there was a craze for
people to stick a safety pin onto an old penny, hapenny or threepenny bit
with araldite once the copper/brass coins were withdrawn, and to wear them
as badges/brooches.

I was 7 at the time and I can remember on D day walking up the road to the
newsagent (now closed down like most of the shops on that parade) to buy my
comic - but now paying for it with new pence rather than pennies. Somewhere
I still have the china mug that each one of us was given by school which had
a conversion table for common amounts like 6d, 1s, 1/6, 2s etc.

  #69  
Old July 29th 15, 09:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,226
Default What units?

On Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:56:26 +0100, "NY" wrote:

I was 7 at the time and I can remember on D day walking up the road to the
newsagent (now closed down like most of the shops on that parade) to buy my
comic - but now paying for it with new pence rather than pennies. Somewhere
I still have the china mug that each one of us was given by school which had
a conversion table for common amounts like 6d, 1s, 1/6, 2s etc.


I remember it as a big fuss about nothing. The silver coins that had
been in circulation for some time all looked the same and had the same
values as the old ones, and it was several days before I bought
anything that required the use of any copper ones. And life just
carried on as before.

Rod.
  #70  
Old July 29th 15, 09:38 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David Kennedy[_2_]
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Posts: 424
Default What units?

On 29/07/2015 09:17, Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:56:26 +0100, "NY" wrote:

I was 7 at the time and I can remember on D day walking up the road to the
newsagent (now closed down like most of the shops on that parade) to buy my
comic - but now paying for it with new pence rather than pennies. Somewhere
I still have the china mug that each one of us was given by school which had
a conversion table for common amounts like 6d, 1s, 1/6, 2s etc.


I remember it as a big fuss about nothing. The silver coins that had
been in circulation for some time all looked the same and had the same
values as the old ones, and it was several days before I bought
anything that required the use of any copper ones. And life just
carried on as before.

Rod.

You must have been quite young. Those of us concerned with acquiring those
silver looking coins were not quite as sanguine about having to pay more for
the same items when everything got rounded up.

--
David Kennedy

http://www.anindianinexile.com
 




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