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What units?



 
 
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  #21  
Old July 22nd 15, 03:40 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,210
Default What units?

On Wed, 22 Jul 2015 05:16:41 -0700 (PDT), MartinR
wrote:

I never understood why the UK went for a half-arsed
system of metricating everything except distances.
If OZ, NZ Canada and Ireland can do it why not the UK.
I understand that road signs would need changing and
that costs money but it will need to happen at some
point as the UK population adapts to metric units, so why delay?


I've always thought the placing of motorway signs at thirds or two
thirds of a mile, rather than halves and quarters, may have been in
preparation for this. Perhaps the real distances are five eighths and
five sixteenths of a mile, which would correspond more accurately to
kilometers and half kilometers, but the fractions may look a bit more
complicated to most people. All they'd have to change would be the
boards themselves, not their supports, but like many half-arsed plans,
it never got completed...

Rod.
  #22  
Old July 22nd 15, 04:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Charles Hope
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Posts: 49
Default What units?

In article ,
Roderick Stewart wrote:
On Wed, 22 Jul 2015 05:16:41 -0700 (PDT), MartinR
wrote:


I never understood why the UK went for a half-arsed
system of metricating everything except distances.
If OZ, NZ Canada and Ireland can do it why not the UK.
I understand that road signs would need changing and
that costs money but it will need to happen at some
point as the UK population adapts to metric units, so why delay?


I've always thought the placing of motorway signs at thirds or two
thirds of a mile, rather than halves and quarters, may have been in
preparation for this. Perhaps the real distances are five eighths and
five sixteenths of a mile, which would correspond more accurately to
kilometers and half kilometers, but the fractions may look a bit more
complicated to most people. All they'd have to change would be the
boards themselves, not their supports, but like many half-arsed plans,
it never got completed...


but the marker posts are at 100m intervals

Rod.


  #23  
Old July 22nd 15, 04:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Chris J Dixon
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Posts: 235
Default What units?

Roderick Stewart wrote:

I've always thought the placing of motorway signs at thirds or two
thirds of a mile, rather than halves and quarters, may have been in
preparation for this. Perhaps the real distances are five eighths and
five sixteenths of a mile, which would correspond more accurately to
kilometers and half kilometers, but the fractions may look a bit more
complicated to most people. All they'd have to change would be the
boards themselves, not their supports, but like many half-arsed plans,
it never got completed...


Generally, they only use 1/3 and 2/3 distances where there is
either a technical difficulty using the mile and half mile
spacing, or a clash with another sign.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.
  #24  
Old July 22nd 15, 04:57 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,237
Default What units?

"MartinR" wrote in message
...
I never understood why the UK went for a half-arsed system of metricating
everything except distances. If OZ, NZ Canada and Ireland can do it why
not the UK. I understand that road signs would need changing and that
costs money but it will need to happen at some point as the UK population
adapts to metric units, so why delay?


When I went over to Ireland on business in the mid 90s, the distance signs
were in km but the speed limit signs were in mph. I was told by the guy that
I was visiting that this was because there were still a lot of cars on the
road which had speedometers calibrated in mph and the authorities didn't
want anyone to try to claim that they were keeping to a signed speed limit
of (for example) 80 km/hr but thought it meant 80 mph :-)

It was difficult having to apply a mental 5/8 conversion between km
distances on the signposts and the miles reading on the speedometer to judge
how far it was to the next town.

I have not-so-fond memories of the journey back from Wexford to Dublin: time
was running short for me to catch my flight home so my host offered to lead
the way in his car, with me following in the hire/pool car. And he shot off
like a bat out of hell, overtaking in all sorts of dangerous places where
I'd have held back, but I didn't know where I was going so I had to try to
follow as best as I could because he didn't wait for me to catch up.
Eventually he made an unplanned turning into a hotel car park, we dumped the
hire car there and did a rapid swap of my luggage into his car because he
thought it would be quicker in his car without me having to follow through
Dublin's rush-hour traffic. It must have looked like a scene from a
Crimewatch reconstruction (or The Sweeney) where the bank robbers move their
loot from one car to another one :-)

  #25  
Old July 22nd 15, 06:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,476
Default What units?

On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 11:14:22 +0100, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

I remember a magazine (Studio Sound I think) that had to make
frequent reference to quarter inch tape, but insisted on calling it
6.25mm tape. I don't know it they were not very good at calculations,
or if they thought for some reason that 6.25 looked nicer than 6.35.
Approximation by truncating unnecessary digits is perfectly
reasonable, but including digits with wrong values is something else.


It's blindingly obvious that they thought 1 inch = 25mm when it obviously
doesn't. Hence 1/4 inch = 6.25mm.
  #26  
Old July 22nd 15, 11:55 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_5_]
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Posts: 488
Default What units?

On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 08:42:29 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 00:36:29 +0100, Davey
wrote:

There is one of those 'Destroyed in Seconds' programmes on Quest right
now. The first item I saw showed a dragster crash. The subtitles gave
distances, speeds etc in Imperial units, but the commentary used metric
units. Most confusing.

Soon after Canada changed to metric, I was at the Hope Slide, a place
in British Columbia where some years before there had been a terrible
landslide. There was a descriptive board, with all distances quoted in
Imperial units. But the Metricators had come along, and made a small
block of wood to fit over each written measurement, with the new metric
values instead.
'Amateurish' only begins to describe the effect.

For everyone's education:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Slide

http://www.penmachine.com/photoessay...hopeslide.html



It really irritates me when text written with imperial units has then
been metricated, and says things like 'the two points were roughly a
yard (0.914 metres) apart', or 'we had to drive about a mile (1.609
kilometres) further'. If it's approximately an imperial unit then give
an approximate metric unit, not an exact conversion, FFS!


When it became a requirement to express weight of foodstuff in metric,
as a protest, a local delicatessen put the metric equivalent of a
pound or quarter-pound in grammes, but to 20 or more decimal places.

--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #27  
Old July 23rd 15, 09:01 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Posts: 7,608
Default What units?

On 21/07/2015 09:21, Indy Jess John wrote:

The thing that annoys me most is that all UK road signs are in miles and
yet the BBC will insist on giving distances in Kilometres. I did start
calculating Km to miles in my head to give me a sense of scale, but now
don't bother. I just ignore them as meaningless distances, since they
are not going to directly affect me.


I quite like kilometres, when driving in countries that use them, you
seem to cover ground a lot faster ?


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #28  
Old July 23rd 15, 09:57 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,237
Default What units?

"Mark Carver" wrote in message
...
On 21/07/2015 09:21, Indy Jess John wrote:

The thing that annoys me most is that all UK road signs are in miles and
yet the BBC will insist on giving distances in Kilometres. I did start
calculating km to miles in my head to give me a sense of scale, but now
don't bother. I just ignore them as meaningless distances, since they
are not going to directly affect me.


I quite like kilometres, when driving in countries that use them, you seem
to cover ground a lot faster ?


I don't have any great preference between miles and kilometres. I just wish
people would pronounce "kilometre" properly - KILoMEtre with the stress on
the first and third syllables, not kilOMMitAH with the stress on 2nd and
4th. SI prefixes all have the stress on the first syllable - KILo, MEGa,
MIcro, MILLi, TERa, GIGa etc. And people have no problem pronouncing metre
correctly when it's not preceded by kilo. So where did this bizarre
kilOMMitAH pronunciation come from? It seems to be more common in younger
people who have grown up with the metric system than with older people who
have grown up with imperial but learned metric "to fit in with the modern
world" or for scientific/engineering purposes. You rarely hear
scientists/engineers use the odd pronunciation, though I've heard Brian Cox
alternate between the two on his TV programmes - maybe he naturally uses the
scientific pronunciation and sometimes remembers to use the "youth"
pronunciation that his producer has told him to use :-).

Sometimes I feel like King Canute :-)

The only disadvantage with kilometre as a word is that it has four syllables
and is a bit of a mouthful - in colloquial parlance I tend to abbreviate it
to K.

Maybe the metric system needs special single-syllable words for
commonly-used multiples like kilometre and kilogramme. It's always struck me
as odd that the unit of mass which is defined by standards is the kilogramme
rather than the gramme: in the days when they used real objects (lump of
metal for mass, metal bar for length) the lump of metal was the standard kg
rather than the standard g.

  #29  
Old July 23rd 15, 10:15 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Charles Hope
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 49
Default What units?

In article , NY
wrote:
"Mark Carver" wrote in message
...
On 21/07/2015 09:21, Indy Jess John wrote:

The thing that annoys me most is that all UK road signs are in miles
and yet the BBC will insist on giving distances in Kilometres. I did
start calculating km to miles in my head to give me a sense of scale,
but now don't bother. I just ignore them as meaningless distances,
since they are not going to directly affect me.


I quite like kilometres, when driving in countries that use them, you
seem to cover ground a lot faster ?


I don't have any great preference between miles and kilometres. I just
wish people would pronounce "kilometre" properly - KILoMEtre with the
stress on the first and third syllables, not kilOMMitAH with the stress
on 2nd and 4th. SI prefixes all have the stress on the first syllable -
KILo, MEGa, MIcro, MILLi, TERa, GIGa etc. And people have no problem
pronouncing metre correctly when it's not preceded by kilo. So where did
this bizarre kilOMMitAH pronunciation come from? It seems to be more
common in younger people who have grown up with the metric system than
with older people who have grown up with imperial but learned metric "to
fit in with the modern world" or for scientific/engineering purposes.
You rarely hear scientists/engineers use the odd pronunciation, though
I've heard Brian Cox alternate between the two on his TV programmes -
maybe he naturally uses the scientific pronunciation and sometimes
remembers to use the "youth" pronunciation that his producer has told
him to use :-).


Sometimes I feel like King Canute :-)


The only disadvantage with kilometre as a word is that it has four
syllables and is a bit of a mouthful - in colloquial parlance I tend to
abbreviate it to K.


Maybe the metric system needs special single-syllable words for
commonly-used multiples like kilometre and kilogramme. It's always struck
me as odd that the unit of mass which is defined by standards is the
kilogramme rather than the gramme: in the days when they used real
objects (lump of metal for mass, metal bar for length) the lump of metal
was the standard kg rather than the standard g.


when I started science at school, c 1950, we used the CGS system but by the
time I got to university we'd moved to the MKS system, then the
Rationalised MKS system and now it's called the SI system - all in one
lifetime.

  #30  
Old July 23rd 15, 10:20 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Charles Hope
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 49
Default What units?

In article ,
wrote:
On Thu, 23 Jul 2015 09:01:34 +0100, Mark Carver
wrote:


On 21/07/2015 09:21, Indy Jess John wrote:

The thing that annoys me most is that all UK road signs are in miles
and yet the BBC will insist on giving distances in Kilometres. I did
start calculating Km to miles in my head to give me a sense of scale,
but now don't bother. I just ignore them as meaningless distances,
since they are not going to directly affect me.


I quite like kilometres, when driving in countries that use them, you
seem to cover ground a lot faster ?


The antithesis of which is drinking beer in Metric means you have
small glasses like a girl* or much bigger ones which means you don't
think you have had many till you stand up.


* 1970's view , actually 500ml isn't a bad amount for a cold drink
in a hot country as you can usually get through it before it gets too
warm in the Sun and then get another cold one.


but the glasses are more likely to be 330cl.

G.Harman


 




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