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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Aerials on Watchdog



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 1st 15, 12:32 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave W
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 265
Default Aerials on Watchdog

Last week's Watchdog featured a firm that fitted new TV aerials when
not required. The show made much play of the ladders "violating health
& safety" but they didn't say what should have been done. Do I take it
that current regulations require full scaffolding to be erected?

Also the throwing of the old aerial from the roof into the garden was
mocked, but I can't see why. Maybe in case a pet dog ran out
unexpectedly and got harpooned?
--
Dave W
  #2  
Old June 1st 15, 01:18 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,381
Default Aerials on Watchdog

Dave W wrote:
Last week's Watchdog featured a firm that fitted new TV aerials when
not required. The show made much play of the ladders "violating health
& safety" but they didn't say what should have been done. Do I take it
that current regulations require full scaffolding to be erected?

Also the throwing of the old aerial from the roof into the garden was
mocked, but I can't see why. Maybe in case a pet dog ran out
unexpectedly and got harpooned?


Many years ago I was on the roof of a terraced house and I threw a coil
of lashing wire into the back yard. As it left my hand a youth appeared,
running fast from the house to the privvy. The coil hit him hard on the
back of the neck. He stumbled but regained his stride and disappeared
into the lavatory. I retrieved the wire but did not check the privvy.
The boy did not come out all the time I was there.

The biggest danger when throwing aerials down is that telephone wires
are hard to see from above. If the aerial plus mast plus chimney bracket
hits a wire it will bounce up in the air and will then have an
unpredictable trajectory, with possibly disastrous consequences.

Bill
  #3  
Old June 1st 15, 03:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,968
Default Aerials on Watchdog

In message , Bill Wright
writes
Dave W wrote:
Last week's Watchdog featured a firm that fitted new TV aerials when
not required. The show made much play of the ladders "violating health
& safety" but they didn't say what should have been done. Do I take it
that current regulations require full scaffolding to be erected?
Also the throwing of the old aerial from the roof into the garden
was
mocked, but I can't see why. Maybe in case a pet dog ran out
unexpectedly and got harpooned?


Many years ago I was on the roof of a terraced house and I threw a coil
of lashing wire into the back yard. As it left my hand a youth
appeared, running fast from the house to the privvy. The coil hit him
hard on the back of the neck. He stumbled but regained his stride and
disappeared into the lavatory. I retrieved the wire but did not check
the privvy. The boy did not come out all the time I was there.

The biggest danger when throwing aerials down is that telephone wires
are hard to see from above. If the aerial plus mast plus chimney
bracket hits a wire it will bounce up in the air and will then have an
unpredictable trajectory, with possibly disastrous consequences.

Unless he's careful, there's also the danger that Newton's Third Law Of
Motion will act to the detriment of the thrower.
--
Ian
  #4  
Old June 2nd 15, 09:28 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 566
Default Aerials on Watchdog

The folk who dismantled a rotator system on my chimney some years ago, had a
set of wires or ropes they used to lower the bits down the side of the
house. the only casualty was a bit of scraped paint.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
Dave W wrote:
Last week's Watchdog featured a firm that fitted new TV aerials when
not required. The show made much play of the ladders "violating health
& safety" but they didn't say what should have been done. Do I take it
that current regulations require full scaffolding to be erected?

Also the throwing of the old aerial from the roof into the garden was
mocked, but I can't see why. Maybe in case a pet dog ran out
unexpectedly and got harpooned?


Many years ago I was on the roof of a terraced house and I threw a coil of
lashing wire into the back yard. As it left my hand a youth appeared,
running fast from the house to the privvy. The coil hit him hard on the
back of the neck. He stumbled but regained his stride and disappeared into
the lavatory. I retrieved the wire but did not check the privvy. The boy
did not come out all the time I was there.

The biggest danger when throwing aerials down is that telephone wires are
hard to see from above. If the aerial plus mast plus chimney bracket hits
a wire it will bounce up in the air and will then have an unpredictable
trajectory, with possibly disastrous consequences.

Bill



  #5  
Old June 2nd 15, 09:38 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Norman Wells[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 949
Default Aerials on Watchdog

"Brian-Gaff" wrote in message
...

The folk who dismantled a rotator system on my chimney some years ago,
had a set of wires or ropes they used to lower the bits down the side
of the house. the only casualty was a bit of scraped paint.
Brian


Couldn't they have avoided that just by throwing it into the garden?

  #6  
Old June 3rd 15, 12:01 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave W
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 265
Default Aerials on Watchdog

On Mon, 01 Jun 2015 13:18:43 +0100, Bill Wright
wrote:

Dave W wrote:
Last week's Watchdog featured a firm that fitted new TV aerials when
not required. The show made much play of the ladders "violating health
& safety" but they didn't say what should have been done. Do I take it
that current regulations require full scaffolding to be erected?

Also the throwing of the old aerial from the roof into the garden was
mocked, but I can't see why. Maybe in case a pet dog ran out
unexpectedly and got harpooned?


Many years ago I was on the roof of a terraced house and I threw a coil
of lashing wire into the back yard. As it left my hand a youth appeared,
running fast from the house to the privvy. The coil hit him hard on the
back of the neck. He stumbled but regained his stride and disappeared
into the lavatory. I retrieved the wire but did not check the privvy.
The boy did not come out all the time I was there.

The biggest danger when throwing aerials down is that telephone wires
are hard to see from above. If the aerial plus mast plus chimney bracket
hits a wire it will bounce up in the air and will then have an
unpredictable trajectory, with possibly disastrous consequences.

Bill


Thanks for that. Now what about scaffolding - is it required for
aerial work? Are ladders forbidden?
Dave
  #7  
Old June 3rd 15, 04:36 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,381
Default Aerials on Watchdog

Dave W wrote:

Thanks for that. Now what about scaffolding - is it required for
aerial work? Are ladders forbidden?
Dave


It's a 'grey area'. It would be impractical to use scaffolding for a
simple TV aerial on a normal house. The phrase that permits ladders is
'work of short duration'.

I have always said that to minimise risk a balance must be made between
doing the job with a ladder and having scaffolding erected. Scaffolding
implies two lorry journeys and loading/unloading and
erecting/dismantling the scaffolding, so there is a risk there.

I feel that it is safer to train people in safe working methods using
ladders than to rely on scaffolding, unless the job presents significant
and abnormal risks for ladder work.

I installed aerials for fifty years and I never had an accident, except
once when a very heavy steel Safety Barrier toppled onto my foot,
causing severe bruising. That was the only time work caused me to go to
A & E.

Bill
 




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