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  #11  
Old May 31st 15, 10:22 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
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Posts: 566
Default TV speakers

But that is like saying the same thing many years back when the tv sound was
better. They seemed to all go bad when crts went out. Its as if the race was
on to make the thinnest tv possible ans sod the sound. We could still add
better sound to older tvs, and some did.
Besides, are sound bars actually very good?
They often have small speakers as well. If you are going for a better sound
then stand alone speakers are what you need.
brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"Andy Burns" wrote in message
o.uk...
Brian-Gaff wrote:

Is there a reason why companies could not use the well learned lessons on
how to make speakers in small boxes sound reasonable be applied to tv
speakers?


Why would they make the TV less profitable when they can make more profit
by selling you a soundbar or 7.1 amp and speakers?



  #12  
Old May 31st 15, 10:25 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
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Posts: 566
Default TV speakers

Well, I'm old fashioned. I think the time is now ripe for a push on how good
real sound systems designed properly can sound, ie hi fi.
Mind you from the sound on some tv programmes, I'd doubt it would do more
than make it bvious that nasty digital lossy compression was used very
badly.

Radio though can be surprisingly good quality if you choose the right
material.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"tim....." wrote in message
...

"Andy Burns" wrote in message
o.uk...
Brian-Gaff wrote:

Is there a reason why companies could not use the well learned lessons
on
how to make speakers in small boxes sound reasonable be applied to tv
speakers?


Why would they make the TV less profitable when they can make more profit
by selling you a soundbar or 7.1 amp and speakers?


and what percentage of consumers buy such add-ons?

None in my circle

tim




  #14  
Old May 31st 15, 11:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Posts: 2,178
Default TV speakers

On Sun, 31 May 2015 09:06:08 +0100, Martin wrote:

Those plastic sound bars and surround-sound speaker kits don't look
beefy enough to sound much better than the built-in speakers in a
typical TV set. They certainly wouldn't tempt me even to think about
replacing my 40 year old Bowers and Wilkins units.


My Philips sound bar is made of cast aluminium. You don;t judge sound by the
look of the packaging.


True, but using previous experience of how performance relates to
general appearance you can judge the likelihood of a listening test
being worth the bother. Sometimes you have to use what amounts to
inspired guesswork because life's too short to investigate everything.
You win some, you lose some.

Rod.
  #15  
Old May 31st 15, 02:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 546
Default TV speakers

On Saturday, 30 May 2015 11:37:51 UTC+1, Brian-Gaff wrote:
Is there a reason why companies could not use the well learned lessons on
how to make speakers in small boxes sound reasonable be applied to tv
speakers?
Listening in a store a while back I was struck by the cheap transistor
radio sounds coming from them.


Indeed the thinner and smaller the set the worse the sound. By contrast the Philips MF-9021 I bought in the 90's had a down facing woofer and two half decent speakers and managed quite well on its own. It also had speaker out terminals for if you didn't have an AV amp By contrast my 2009 flat screen TV has pretty poor speakers.

In both cases any content that deserved it gets the 5.1 amp and speakers switched on (films, cup final, Glastonbury), but for general news etc. I just use the TV.


I mean, its not rocket science is it?


No, but it is a couple more boxes.


Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active


  #16  
Old May 31st 15, 10:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Johnny B Good[_2_]
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Posts: 459
Default TV speakers

On Sun, 31 May 2015 10:22:48 +0100, Brian-Gaff wrote:

But that is like saying the same thing many years back when the tv sound
was better. They seemed to all go bad when crts went out. Its as if the
race was on to make the thinnest tv possible ans sod the sound. We could
still add better sound to older tvs, and some did.
Besides, are sound bars actually very good?
They often have small speakers as well. If you are going for a better
sound
then stand alone speakers are what you need.
brian


Even a cheap pair of PC speakers (circa ten quid) are often a vast
improvement over that available from most models of flat screen TV sets.

There's no need to spend 70 quid or more on a 'sound bar' which may well
not be any better than a cheap set of PC speakers.

--
Johnny B Good
  #17  
Old May 31st 15, 11:15 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Davey
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Posts: 2,269
Default TV speakers

On Sun, 31 May 2015 21:23:27 GMT
Johnny B Good wrote:

On Sun, 31 May 2015 10:22:48 +0100, Brian-Gaff wrote:

But that is like saying the same thing many years back when the tv
sound was better. They seemed to all go bad when crts went out. Its
as if the race was on to make the thinnest tv possible ans sod the
sound. We could still add better sound to older tvs, and some did.
Besides, are sound bars actually very good?
They often have small speakers as well. If you are going for a
better sound
then stand alone speakers are what you need.
brian


Even a cheap pair of PC speakers (circa ten quid) are often a vast
improvement over that available from most models of flat screen TV
sets.

There's no need to spend 70 quid or more on a 'sound bar' which may
well not be any better than a cheap set of PC speakers.


I use a Logitech PC 'speaker set, including a small subwoofer, that cost
me £25. It is a huge improvement over the TV set's built-in tinny
things.

--
Davey.

  #18  
Old June 1st 15, 01:06 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
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Posts: 9,381
Default TV speakers

Davey wrote:

I use a Logitech PC 'speaker set, including a small subwoofer, that cost
me £25. It is a huge improvement over the TV set's built-in tinny
things.


I have improved the sound from our dining room Sony by positioning a
piece of aluminium below the set, with its face at an angle that
reflects the sound forwards.

Years ago when sidewise facing speakers were used on the rental sets of
the firm I was working for I used to satisfy many complaints from eldery
people by placing an upright and carefully angled book next to the set.

Talking of reflections, I built a slide for the grandchildren a while
back (although adults seem to use it as well). The curved section at the
bottom is aluminium, and this afternoon I happened to have my hand
momentarily in exactly the location where the sun's rays were focussed.
The heat was remarkable!

Yes I do know about that big building in London. There's a lot of daft
things in London; that's just another one.

Bill
  #19  
Old June 1st 15, 07:39 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_5_]
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Posts: 488
Default TV speakers

On Mon, 01 Jun 2015 01:06:57 +0100, Bill Wright
wrote:

Davey wrote:

I use a Logitech PC 'speaker set, including a small subwoofer, that cost
me 25. It is a huge improvement over the TV set's built-in tinny
things.


I have improved the sound from our dining room Sony by positioning a
piece of aluminium below the set, with its face at an angle that
reflects the sound forwards.

Years ago when sidewise facing speakers were used on the rental sets of
the firm I was working for I used to satisfy many complaints from eldery
people by placing an upright and carefully angled book next to the set.

Talking of reflections, I built a slide for the grandchildren a while
back (although adults seem to use it as well). The curved section at the
bottom is aluminium, and this afternoon I happened to have my hand
momentarily in exactly the location where the sun's rays were focussed.
The heat was remarkable!

Yes I do know about that big building in London. There's a lot of daft
things in London; that's just another one.

Bill


One of the most memorable and rewarding jobs I did when I was in the
TV rental game was to make reasonably good TV sound horribly tinny.

The elderly lady subscriber (That's what we used to call the customers
back then) had mentioned to me that she could understand what was
being said on her little transistor radio, but her 19 inch telly
sounded all muffled to her ears.

I thought if I could greatly reduce the bass response it might help,
so I replaced the 100nf anode to grid coupling capacitor of the PCL86
sound valve with something in the order of a few hundred pf. It
sounded just like her tranny and she was very pleased.




--

Graham.

%Profound_observation%
  #20  
Old June 1st 15, 08:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,381
Default TV speakers

Graham. wrote:

One of the most memorable and rewarding jobs I did when I was in the
TV rental game was to make reasonably good TV sound horribly tinny.

The elderly lady subscriber (That's what we used to call the customers
back then) had mentioned to me that she could understand what was
being said on her little transistor radio, but her 19 inch telly
sounded all muffled to her ears.

I thought if I could greatly reduce the bass response it might help,
so I replaced the 100nf anode to grid coupling capacitor of the PCL86
sound valve with something in the order of a few hundred pf. It
sounded just like her tranny and she was very pleased.


You tailored the telly to her hearing response!

Bill
 




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