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The future of TV?



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 26th 15, 08:55 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
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Default The future of TV?

Seems to me there is a concerted push at the moment to make all content
transient.
By that I mean, in the beginning it was whatever was on at the time was
what you watched, then came video recording and pre recorded tapes. This
seemed to annoy the content providers as folk bypassed the adverts on time
shifted stuff, but of course the folk selling films liked it as another
revenue stream.
Then came dvds etc, to replace tapes. Arguably, dvd recorders were not as
successful as tapes due to their more complex recording nature, ie needing
to be finalised to play on other players etc.
Next we had PVRs, where the recordings were local and often protected, so
you still needed your dvd or blue ray to play stuff you bought.
However, then with the proliferation of the Internet, and catch up services
etc, things got a whole lot more complicated, meaning that everyone needed
the internet to be connected. In effect making everyone cable users. This
seems to be the time that content providers have begun to make most of the
stuff they used to put on dvds, onto so called boxed sets or paid for
downloads. However apart from Sky, who seem to give you a dvd of your
purchase as well as streaming and local storage, the trend in entertainment
has bypassed the solid state memory version of content you can buy, and is
veering toward people not actually owning anything but a licence to be able
to access content.
However if this goes too quickly, all those really in remote areas with
crap broadband will be very disadvantaged.

How long before content delivered by aerial is replaced by the internet
completely?
I may well be old fashioned, but there is something about owning a product,
rather than just viewing or listening to it .

Brian

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From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active


  #2  
Old May 26th 15, 09:49 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David[_9_]
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Default The future of TV?

Yes agree with you I think the days of UHF transmission of TV is limited, as
more and more taken for mobile phone use.
Regards
David

  #3  
Old May 26th 15, 11:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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Default The future of TV?

On Tue, 26 May 2015 08:55:20 +0100, "Brian-Gaff"
wrote:

How long before content delivered by aerial is replaced by the internet
completely?


Perhaps not long in my house. I probably watch roughly equal amounts
of material on PVR and computer already, and I don't see the
proportion ever swinging back towards TV. Sometimes there are more
programmes broadcast simultaneously than my PVRs can cope with, so I
just watch the extra ones on iPlayer, which raises the inevitable
question, why bother to record any of them locally at all? Perhaps if
I'm honest I'm only using the list of recorded programmes in the PVR
as a reminder of what I meant to watch, but there must be other ways
of doing that.

I've already sold the hi-fi tuner because I simply wasn't using it,
and all the stations it could receive plus thousands more could be
found on the internet. It may only be a matter of time before I end up
doing the same with TV.

All of this depends on the availability of fast enough internet
connections of course, and suitably large (or absent) download
allowances from the providers of it. Most internet provision still
seems to be in areas where infrastructure was already present before
the internet was invented, and even new infrastructure, such as
coaxial cable, seems mostly to have been installed in highly populated
and presumably lucrative areas already well served. For fast internet
to spread further, either the government would have to take over the
responsibility for infrastructure as a public service, or the
companies would have to adopt much more philanthropic business plans.
I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for either of these to happen.

I may well be old fashioned, but there is something about owning a product,
rather than just viewing or listening to it .


Indeed, and if I think something is worth repeated viewing or
listening I sometimes end up buying it on disk, but there's very
little on mainstream TV these days that inspires me to do this.

Rod.
  #4  
Old May 26th 15, 01:03 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
J.B.Treadstone[_4_]
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Default The future of TV?

On Tue, 26 May 2015 08:55:20 +0100, Brian-Gaff wrote:

snipped for brevity

How long before content delivered by aerial is replaced by the internet
completely?
I may well be old fashioned, but there is something about owning a
product, rather than just viewing or listening to it .


X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express
I find that rather ironic. ;-)


  #5  
Old May 26th 15, 01:27 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian-Gaff
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Posts: 566
Default The future of TV?

Its horses for courses. In my world at least, i'd not want to buy a tv
series cos it would not bear multiple showings, but music content is worth
buying as a product as it has more lasting appeal.
Of cours in my current codition the cd version of , say a concert is more
useful and cost effective than a dvd. The problem with dvd players is that
they force you to use their menus which mostly do not talk to the user, so
they won't just play. CDs just play.
Brian

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From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"J.B.Treadstone" wrote in message
news
On Tue, 26 May 2015 08:55:20 +0100, Brian-Gaff wrote:

snipped for brevity

How long before content delivered by aerial is replaced by the internet
completely?
I may well be old fashioned, but there is something about owning a
product, rather than just viewing or listening to it .


X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express
I find that rather ironic. ;-)




  #6  
Old May 26th 15, 11:16 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
J.B.Treadstone[_4_]
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Posts: 12
Default The future of TV?

On Tue, 26 May 2015 13:27:45 +0100, Brian-Gaff wrote:

Its horses for courses. In my world at least, i'd not want to buy a tv
series cos it would not bear multiple showings, but music content is worth
buying as a product as it has more lasting appeal.
Of cours in my current codition the cd version of , say a concert is more
useful and cost effective than a dvd. The problem with dvd players is that
they force you to use their menus which mostly do not talk to the user,
so they won't just play. CDs just play.
Brian


I was actually referring to you saying that you "may well be old
fashioned, but there is something about owning a product, rather than just
viewing or listening to it", & you use MS Windows.
It's surprising, IMO, how many windows users think they actually _own_ the
software.


  #7  
Old May 27th 15, 08:35 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
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Posts: 205
Default The future of TV?

On Tuesday, 26 May 2015 23:16:04 UTC+1, J.B.Treadstone wrote:
I was actually referring to you saying that you "may well be old
fashioned, but there is something about owning a product, rather than just
viewing or listening to it", & you use MS Windows.
It's surprising, IMO, how many windows users think they actually _own_ the
software.


But there's a difference between buying a piece of music for lasting pleasure over the decades to come, and 'buying' MS Windows.

'Lasting' and 'pleasure' being two of them.

Owain

(and yes I use Windows - for some things)
  #8  
Old May 27th 15, 10:19 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
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Posts: 1,241
Default The future of TV?

On 26/05/2015 23:16, J.B.Treadstone wrote:

It's surprising, IMO, how many windows users think they actually _own_ the
software.


I *own* a CD on which Windows XP is recorded. It is not until I
transfer that software onto a PC that it tells me that I won't own that
copy of it.

/pedant

Jim
  #9  
Old May 27th 15, 01:27 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
R. Mark Clayton[_2_]
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Posts: 546
Default The future of TV?

On Wednesday, 27 May 2015 10:19:56 UTC+1, Indy Jess John wrote:
On 26/05/2015 23:16, J.B.Treadstone wrote:

It's surprising, IMO, how many windows users think they actually _own_ the
software.


I *own* a CD on which Windows XP is recorded. It is not until I
transfer that software onto a PC that it tells me that I won't own that
copy of it.

/pedant

Jim


If you own XP on CD then you own the CD and the right to run one copy. You allowed to reinstall or on another machine if you transfer the license (e.g. after equipment failure). OEM pre-installed MS software dies with machine.
  #10  
Old May 27th 15, 09:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Indy Jess John
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Posts: 1,241
Default The future of TV?

On 27/05/2015 13:27, R. Mark Clayton wrote:
On Wednesday, 27 May 2015 10:19:56 UTC+1, Indy Jess John wrote:
On 26/05/2015 23:16, J.B.Treadstone wrote:

It's surprising, IMO, how many windows users think they actually _own_ the
software.


I *own* a CD on which Windows XP is recorded. It is not until I
transfer that software onto a PC that it tells me that I won't own that
copy of it.

/pedant

Jim


If you own XP on CD then you own the CD and the right to run one copy. You allowed to reinstall or on another machine if you transfer the license (e.g. after equipment failure). OEM pre-installed MS software dies with machine.


That is why I ordered a bare PC and a CD.

Jim

 




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