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Got the wind up



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 5th 15, 04:22 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
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Posts: 9,381
Default Got the wind up

Wind power today is working at around one two hundredth of installed
capacity. So what? Installed capacity is only about 10GW, so the
shortfall is easily made up.

But what will happen in 2020 when we will have, by all accounts, 15% of
all our energy (not just electricity) coming from wind? This 15% equates
to around 30% of electricity supply or 20GW. On a still day we will lose
99.5% of that, or nearly a third of our total generating capacity. Then
what? Suppose there's a cold evening?

Bill
  #2  
Old April 5th 15, 04:27 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Woody[_5_]
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Posts: 1,781
Default Got the wind up


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
Wind power today is working at around one two hundredth of installed
capacity. So what? Installed capacity is only about 10GW, so the
shortfall is easily made up.

But what will happen in 2020 when we will have, by all accounts, 15%
of all our energy (not just electricity) coming from wind? This 15%
equates to around 30% of electricity supply or 20GW. On a still day
we will lose 99.5% of that, or nearly a third of our total
generating capacity. Then what? Suppose there's a cold evening?

Er, is that 15% coming from wind, or 15% coming from renewables?

Today being bright and sunny the solar panel farms are probably doing
very well?


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


  #3  
Old April 5th 15, 04:31 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_2_]
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Posts: 2,968
Default Got the wind up

I've never seen the wind contribution so low (0.17GW / 0.55% of 30.6GW
total). With the present high pressure likely to sit over us for the
next few days, when we all get back to work on Tuesday, and the demand
goes up, percentage-wise of the total demand the wind is going to look
even more pathetic than it is at the moment.
http://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk/

In message , Bill Wright
writes
Wind power today is working at around one two hundredth of installed
capacity. So what? Installed capacity is only about 10GW, so the
shortfall is easily made up.

But what will happen in 2020 when we will have, by all accounts, 15% of
all our energy (not just electricity) coming from wind? This 15%
equates to around 30% of electricity supply or 20GW. On a still day we
will lose 99.5% of that, or nearly a third of our total generating
capacity. Then what? Suppose there's a cold evening?

Bill


--
Ian
  #4  
Old April 5th 15, 04:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,894
Default Got the wind up

I offer my garden for a nuclear reactor site. its free.
Actually, all this number stuff worries me. I understand they used the
recent Eclipse in Germany to test the power networks resilience when solar
was reduced. To me this has always sounded daft. You want solar around the
equator, surely not in northern climbs?



As for wind, it seems that they are now seeing that when you put up a lot of
turbines, you actually affect local weather,which often means less wind is
present than before the turbines were there. Surely this is obvious as the
more power you take out of wind the less is left for other turbines. In fact
what happens is more chaotic turbulence so they cannot work very well.

We are doomed!
Brian

--
Brian Gaff....Note, this account does not accept Bcc: email.
graphics are great, but the blind can't hear them
Email:
__________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________


"Woody" wrote in message
...

"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...
Wind power today is working at around one two hundredth of installed
capacity. So what? Installed capacity is only about 10GW, so the
shortfall is easily made up.

But what will happen in 2020 when we will have, by all accounts, 15% of
all our energy (not just electricity) coming from wind? This 15% equates
to around 30% of electricity supply or 20GW. On a still day we will lose
99.5% of that, or nearly a third of our total generating capacity. Then
what? Suppose there's a cold evening?

Er, is that 15% coming from wind, or 15% coming from renewables?

Today being bright and sunny the solar panel farms are probably doing very
well?


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com



  #5  
Old April 5th 15, 04:56 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Brian Gaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,894
Default Got the wind up

Yes tidal power is the way to go. The moon is not going away any time soon
after all. It might have the added benefit of helping tostop storm surges
and flooding.

Or the core of this planet is very worm indeed due to gravitational pulling
and shoving, so can we not simply get some of that heat for generating
power?
Brian

--
Brian Gaff....Note, this account does not accept Bcc: email.
graphics are great, but the blind can't hear them
Email:
__________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________


"Ian Jackson" wrote in message
...
I've never seen the wind contribution so low (0.17GW / 0.55% of 30.6GW
total). With the present high pressure likely to sit over us for the next
few days, when we all get back to work on Tuesday, and the demand goes up,
percentage-wise of the total demand the wind is going to look even more
pathetic than it is at the moment.
http://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk/

In message , Bill Wright
writes
Wind power today is working at around one two hundredth of installed
capacity. So what? Installed capacity is only about 10GW, so the shortfall
is easily made up.

But what will happen in 2020 when we will have, by all accounts, 15% of
all our energy (not just electricity) coming from wind? This 15% equates
to around 30% of electricity supply or 20GW. On a still day we will lose
99.5% of that, or nearly a third of our total generating capacity. Then
what? Suppose there's a cold evening?

Bill


--
Ian



  #6  
Old April 5th 15, 05:20 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,239
Default Got the wind up

On Sun, 05 Apr 2015 16:22:32 +0100, Bill Wright
wrote:

Wind power today is working at around one two hundredth of installed
capacity. So what? Installed capacity is only about 10GW, so the
shortfall is easily made up.

But what will happen in 2020 when we will have, by all accounts, 15% of
all our energy (not just electricity) coming from wind? This 15% equates
to around 30% of electricity supply or 20GW. On a still day we will lose
99.5% of that, or nearly a third of our total generating capacity. Then
what? Suppose there's a cold evening?

Why on *earth* are you still wasting your time calculating energy
requirements?
Wind power is not about generating energy. It's about generating
subsidy payments.
But you knew that didn't you?

  #7  
Old April 5th 15, 08:44 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
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Posts: 9,381
Default Got the wind up

Woody wrote:

Today being bright and sunny the solar panel farms are probably doing
very well?

Yes it was lovely until dusk.

Bill
  #8  
Old April 6th 15, 02:58 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,381
Default Got the wind up

Wolfgang Schwanke wrote:
Bill Wright
wrote in :

But what will happen in 2020 when we will have, by all accounts, 15% of
all our energy (not just electricity) coming from wind? This 15% equates
to around 30% of electricity supply or 20GW. On a still day we will lose
99.5% of that, or nearly a third of our total generating capacity. Then
what? Suppose there's a cold evening?


Of course, conventional power plants go online as if no wind turbines
had been built. Wind and solar cannot replace a single conventional
power plant, regardless how many have been installed. They merely force
them to shut down temporarily.

Yes but will there be enough conventional power plants sitting there,
unused for much of the time?

Bill
  #9  
Old April 6th 15, 08:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Vir Campestris
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Posts: 404
Default Got the wind up

On 05/04/2015 16:27, Woody wrote:
Today being bright and sunny the solar panel farms are probably doing
very well?


B**** all sun over here (Cambs).

But solar wouldn't help the winter teatime peak.

Andy
 




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