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Fwd: OT help my computer is full



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 5th 15, 10:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Gary[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 525
Default Fwd: OT help my computer is full




-------- Original Message --------
Subject: OT help my computer is full
Date: Sat, 03 Jan 2015 13:38:27 +0000
From: Gary
Reply-To:
Organisation: Gary
To: Johny B Good



On 03/01/2015 03:00, Johny B Good wrote:
On Fri, 02 Jan 2015 12:19:00 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

On Fri, 02 Jan 2015 10:16:17 +0000, Java Jive
wrote:

Organise yourself - as Jerome K Jerome once had one of his
characters say in "Three Men In A Boat", you must keep not what you
could do with, but only what you can't do without. One way of
compromising in this respect is to not move things you could do with
directly into the Recycle Bin, but actually create another level of
recycle bin that you, rather than the OS, control. Thus I have on my
NASs a folder called ToBeDeleted for things that I don't think I'm
going to need again, but would rather not delete until I must. When I
run out of disk space, I go through this area to see what can most
painlessly be sacrificed.

My equivalent of this is called a pair of external backup drives, and
a copy of "Second Copy" which automatically backs up all the stuff I
want to keep every morning. On the computer itself, if I decide
something can be deleted, it gets deleted, the recycle bin is
routinely cleared along with a load of other junk by the use of
"CCleaner", and I accept that once it's gone, it's gone, and it's my
own stupid fault if I didn't mean it.

Even then, if it's an "Oops! I didn't meant delete _that_ file, it
was the other one I meant to delete" moment immediately after hitting
the ok button, you can use something like "Handy Recovery 1.0" to undo
the delete action (which _is_ handy for me since I habitually use
shift delete to save cluttering up the recycle bin).

However, if I *really* didn't mean it, whatever was on the computer
yesterday will still be available on the backup drives, and can be
copied back.

Or use "Handy Recovery 1.0" or WHY.
Ultimately though, whatever equipment or software you use, it really
boils down to discipline and knowing what you want to keep. A Windows
7 installation with a few applications installed will typically only
occupy around 40GB itself, so anything more than that will be the
user's own stuff: documents, pictures, videos, music etc. If the OP is
running out of space on a 1TB drive, he's got some serious spring
cleaning to do.

That's for sure! However, if he's describing the typical OEM
inflicted "One Single Huge Partition on The HDD for Everything", there
could be any number of reasons for the disk volume filling up.

The default setting for crash dump files is to save the full ram's
worth to disk which could be 2 or more gigabyes at a time. A few
system crashes could have tied up disk with several tens of GB's worth
of useless data.

IE used to allocate 2% (actually, 2.99999%) of disk space space for
its cache. These days it's a more reasonable, even if still
outrageous, 1024MB. And, of course, there's all those temp files which
just simply keep on accumulating which can account for a GB or two (I
rarely see more than a GB's worth of such temp files on customers'
systems these days though).

Then, of course, there are legitimate consumers of disk space, photo
and movie files. If the OP is a prolific photographer, he could quite
easily generate a few GB's worth of jpegs a year but it's the movie
files that can really burn up disk space and if he's been regularly
shooting movies or recording TV programmes, a TB's worth or more a
year wouldn't be considered an unusually large amount.

If the bulk of the space is being consumed by such user generated
files, it's up to the user to move them onto other disk drive volumes
to free up space. Although cleaning the temp files out along with
redundent crash dump files might clear up several GBs, this usually
only gives a short lived relief if the user carries on producing or
collecting large media files.

It would seem to me that until now the OP has been operating his PC
as a happy go lucky "Consumer", blithely unaware, until now, that the
PC is not a bottomless pit for data storage. He's now asking for
advice that, if taken, should elevate him from "Consumer" to "User"
and take a more active interest in getting the best use out of his PC.

I said it was not the data and photos. And the computer is over 4 years
old . it is program junk. I use separate drives for music photos and the
like.

Sorry that some need to feel superior but I did say that in my first
post. I just thought that I had possibly missed a easy way out of the
problem but obviously I have not.

Real help appreciated.
Thanks

Gary





  #2  
Old January 5th 15, 11:16 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Derek F[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 133
Default Fwd: OT help my computer is full

On 05/01/2015 11:34, Gary wrote:



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: OT help my computer is full
Date: Sat, 03 Jan 2015 13:38:27 +0000
From: Gary
Reply-To:
Organisation: Gary
To: Johny B Good



On 03/01/2015 03:00, Johny B Good wrote:
On Fri, 02 Jan 2015 12:19:00 +0000, Roderick Stewart
wrote:

On Fri, 02 Jan 2015 10:16:17 +0000, Java Jive
wrote:

Organise yourself - as Jerome K Jerome once had one of his
characters say in "Three Men In A Boat", you must keep not what you
could do with, but only what you can't do without. One way of
compromising in this respect is to not move things you could do with
directly into the Recycle Bin, but actually create another level of
recycle bin that you, rather than the OS, control. Thus I have on my
NASs a folder called ToBeDeleted for things that I don't think I'm
going to need again, but would rather not delete until I must. When I
run out of disk space, I go through this area to see what can most
painlessly be sacrificed.
My equivalent of this is called a pair of external backup drives, and
a copy of "Second Copy" which automatically backs up all the stuff I
want to keep every morning. On the computer itself, if I decide
something can be deleted, it gets deleted, the recycle bin is
routinely cleared along with a load of other junk by the use of
"CCleaner", and I accept that once it's gone, it's gone, and it's my
own stupid fault if I didn't mean it.

Even then, if it's an "Oops! I didn't meant delete _that_ file, it
was the other one I meant to delete" moment immediately after hitting
the ok button, you can use something like "Handy Recovery 1.0" to undo
the delete action (which _is_ handy for me since I habitually use
shift delete to save cluttering up the recycle bin).

However, if I *really* didn't mean it, whatever was on the computer
yesterday will still be available on the backup drives, and can be
copied back.

Or use "Handy Recovery 1.0" or WHY.
Ultimately though, whatever equipment or software you use, it really
boils down to discipline and knowing what you want to keep. A Windows
7 installation with a few applications installed will typically only
occupy around 40GB itself, so anything more than that will be the
user's own stuff: documents, pictures, videos, music etc. If the OP is
running out of space on a 1TB drive, he's got some serious spring
cleaning to do.

That's for sure! However, if he's describing the typical OEM
inflicted "One Single Huge Partition on The HDD for Everything", there
could be any number of reasons for the disk volume filling up.

The default setting for crash dump files is to save the full ram's
worth to disk which could be 2 or more gigabyes at a time. A few
system crashes could have tied up disk with several tens of GB's worth
of useless data.

IE used to allocate 2% (actually, 2.99999%) of disk space space for
its cache. These days it's a more reasonable, even if still
outrageous, 1024MB. And, of course, there's all those temp files which
just simply keep on accumulating which can account for a GB or two (I
rarely see more than a GB's worth of such temp files on customers'
systems these days though).

Then, of course, there are legitimate consumers of disk space, photo
and movie files. If the OP is a prolific photographer, he could quite
easily generate a few GB's worth of jpegs a year but it's the movie
files that can really burn up disk space and if he's been regularly
shooting movies or recording TV programmes, a TB's worth or more a
year wouldn't be considered an unusually large amount.

If the bulk of the space is being consumed by such user generated
files, it's up to the user to move them onto other disk drive volumes
to free up space. Although cleaning the temp files out along with
redundent crash dump files might clear up several GBs, this usually
only gives a short lived relief if the user carries on producing or
collecting large media files.

It would seem to me that until now the OP has been operating his PC
as a happy go lucky "Consumer", blithely unaware, until now, that the
PC is not a bottomless pit for data storage. He's now asking for
advice that, if taken, should elevate him from "Consumer" to "User"
and take a more active interest in getting the best use out of his PC.

I said it was not the data and photos. And the computer is over 4 years
old . it is program junk. I use separate drives for music photos and the
like.

Sorry that some need to feel superior but I did say that in my first
post. I just thought that I had possibly missed a easy way out of the
problem but obviously I have not.

Real help appreciated.
Thanks

Gary





Try ccleaner, it works wonders
https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner
Derek
  #3  
Old January 5th 15, 12:53 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jim Lesurf[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,130
Default Fwd: OT help my computer is full

In article , Martin
wrote:
On Mon, 05 Jan 2015 11:34:40 +0000, Gary
wrote:



Sorry that some need to feel superior but I did say that in my first
post. I just thought that I had possibly missed a easy way out of the
problem but obviously I have not.

Real help appreciated.


My old WinXP PC C disk filled up with Windows hidden files of backups


I recall once getting a project report from a student which came in the
form of a Word doc on a CDROM.

....or more specifically, it came as a large number of files with very
similar names, filling the CDROM. i.e. all the 'hidden backups' he had no
idea his computer had been filling every available space with.

Jim

--
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scot...o/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

 




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