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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets



 
 
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  #31  
Old January 4th 15, 03:49 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
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Posts: 4,016
Default Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets

In article , Geoff Pearson
wrote:

wrote in message
...
Just come back from trying to fit a satellite dish to my parent's new
house, which was fitted with TV cables and sockets by the sparkies but
no dish. Didn't install the dish, by the way, but that's another story.

What surprised me was that where I expected to see sockets for F-plugs
in the wall, with their sticking out screw barrel, the sockets were
flush like a Belling-Lee (which they definitely weren't). In the
centre was a pin, i.e. it was male, which was quite thin but hollow.
The inside of the barrel might have had very fine threads, but I don't
think so.

Seeing as they wouldn't take my F-plugs, even a push fit one, the best
solution was to whip it off and fit another socket, but I an curious to
know what those sockets are called and whether they are reckoned to be
better than F-plugs or not.

Cheers.


I still want to know what these mysterious sockets are. Can we get back
to the OP question. please?


If they were already F-plugs, you'd have needed an F socket to connect to
them. Can you find something on-line that looks the same and give us the
reference?

--
From KT24

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18

  #32  
Old January 4th 15, 06:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
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Posts: 9,381
Default Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets

Brian Gaff wrote:
Off on another tangent. When I was younger and before we had colour tv
officially in the UK our labs had imported some American TVs and had
modified the decoders for Pal etc. I was rether mystified to see that the
aerial connectors were just two in pins, ie balanced 300 ohm connector type
fittings.
Do they still use this standard over there or are they all coaxial now?
I can recall many uk tvs like battery portables had this as well and usally
supplied a balun for use here.
Brian


During the colour boom of the 70s the UK industry couldn't make enough
sets, and Jap imports were restricted to small sizes. As a result we had
tellys coming in from Scandinavia and Germany, and some of those had 300
ohm balanced aerial sockets. I used to use those little baluns meant for
FM. They worked OK at UHF.

Bill
  #33  
Old January 4th 15, 06:52 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
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Posts: 9,381
Default Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets

Ian Jackson wrote:

I think that, because of their use in the cable TV industry, all US TVs
have had (only) F-connectors for ages.


Some BI tellys on the early 50s had two terminals, aerial and earth. You
could attach coax, but many people treated the thing like shortwave and
installed a long wire aerial.

Bill
  #34  
Old January 4th 15, 07:05 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
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Posts: 9,381
Default Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets

Graham. wrote:

When we got our first BBC2 set, it seemed very experimental
bleeding-edge technology to me.


Bleeding hell!

And the aerial reminded me of the
ladder in the budgie's cage.


Was the budgie feeling a bit seedy? (C/D, geddit?)

Winter Hill BBC2 was the only signal receivable in the entire UHF
range, but that was due to the insensitivity of the valve tuner.


And the seedy aerial and the cable loss would reduce reception of owt
much else.

Bill
  #35  
Old January 4th 15, 08:34 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Jaffna Dog
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Posts: 17
Default Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets

There are UHF radio mics at around 800MHz, you could try listening later on Sunday mornings, a lot of churches use them, Asians in particular seem keen on handheld radio mics. I did come across one, imported from India, that operated in the UHF airband!
  #36  
Old January 4th 15, 09:15 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Ratcliffe
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Posts: 2,426
Default Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets

On Sat, 03 Jan 2015 21:36:58 +0000, Bill Wright wrote:

What gets me is the amount of UHF radio kit (mainly for
amateur use) that has a SO259 for its aerial socket.
PL/SO259 is only rated to 200MHz!


Yes, it's odd. They are also colloquially known as UHF plugs!


We called them F&E.
  #38  
Old January 4th 15, 09:43 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
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Posts: 4,016
Default Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets

In article , Dickie mint
wrote:
On 02/01/2015 18:01, wrote:
Just come back from trying to fit a satellite dish to my parent's new
house, which was fitted with TV cables and sockets by the sparkies but
no dish. Didn't install the dish, by the way, but that's another story.

What surprised me was that where I expected to see sockets for F-plugs
in the wall, with their sticking out screw barrel, the sockets were
flush like a Belling-Lee (which they definitely weren't). In the centre
was a pin, i.e. it was male, which was quite thin but hollow. The
inside of the barrel might have had very fine threads, but I don't
think so.

Seeing as they wouldn't take my F-plugs, even a push fit one, the best
solution was to whip it off and fit another socket, but I an curious to
know what those sockets are called and whether they are reckoned to be
better than F-plugs or not.

Cheers.

Naive question maybe. Was there a manufacturer's name and type number
on the socket?



If you google for aerial sockets and then click on images, you will see a
few hundred pictures. Does any one of them look like the one you found?

But I've just noticed you said "fitted by the sparkies" - so it could be
anything.

--
From KT24

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18

  #39  
Old January 5th 15, 08:07 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,016
Default Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets

In article ,
Paul Ratcliffe wrote:
On Sat, 03 Jan 2015 21:36:58 +0000, Bill Wright wrote:


What gets me is the amount of UHF radio kit (mainly for
amateur use) that has a SO259 for its aerial socket.
PL/SO259 is only rated to 200MHz!


Yes, it's odd. They are also colloquially known as UHF plugs!


We called them F&E.


they used to be fitted to Tektronix 'scopes (early '60s), but were replaced
with BNCs (B***** nasty connectors) (to make up, at least)

--
From KT24

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18

  #40  
Old January 5th 15, 12:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
george
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Posts: 4
Default Satellite sockets that aren't F-plug sockets

On 04/01/2015 16:14, Geoff Pearson wrote:

wrote in message
...
Just come back from trying to fit a satellite dish to my parent's new
house, which was fitted with TV cables and sockets by the sparkies but
no dish. Didn't install the dish, by the way, but that's another story.

What surprised me was that where I expected to see sockets for F-plugs
in the wall, with their sticking out screw barrel, the sockets were
flush like a Belling-Lee (which they definitely weren't). In the
centre was a pin, i.e. it was male, which was quite thin but hollow.
The inside of the barrel might have had very fine threads, but I don't
think so.

Seeing as they wouldn't take my F-plugs, even a push fit one, the best
solution was to whip it off and fit another socket, but I an curious
to know what those sockets are called and whether they are reckoned to
be better than F-plugs or not.

Cheers.


I still want to know what these mysterious sockets are. Can we get back
to the OP question. please?



You must be joking! They "like the sound of their own voice" too much.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com

 




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