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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker



 
 
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  #21  
Old May 24th 13, 09:56 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Andy[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker

On 23/05/2013 12:06, Sara wrote:
In article ,
Bill Wright wrote:

Sara wrote:

For anyone who prefers an electric one, mine's so old it isn't listed
any more, but it's pretty much this jobbie:
http://www.arrowstaples.co.uk/arret5...ectric-t50-sta
ple-gun.html


Do you use it to staple Rog's ears to the floor if he says 'lady'?

Bill


Only in a situation where he wouldn't say 'gentleman' to man ;-)

Oops. I just sent this directlty to Sara rather then the group. Sorry Sara.

I've just got around to looking up lady in my dictionary (Concise
Oxford). One of the meanings of lady is a woman.

If I look up woman, one of the meanings is wife. Does than mean I can
refer to my wife as my woman?

One of the usage examples they give for lady is "ask that lady over
there", which I totally agree with. It sounds so wrong telling someone
to "ask that woman over there". "Ask that man over there", however,
sounds fine.

Bring back gentlewoman, that's what I say
  #22  
Old May 24th 13, 10:07 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,003
Default Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker

On Fri, 24 May 2013 10:56:39 +0100, Andy
wrote:

Sara wrote:

For anyone who prefers an electric one, mine's so old it isn't listed
any more, but it's pretty much this jobbie:
http://www.arrowstaples.co.uk/arret5...ectric-t50-sta
ple-gun.html


Do you use it to staple Rog's ears to the floor if he says 'lady'?

Bill


Only in a situation where he wouldn't say 'gentleman' to man ;-)

Oops. I just sent this directlty to Sara rather then the group. Sorry Sara.

I've just got around to looking up lady in my dictionary (Concise
Oxford). One of the meanings of lady is a woman.

If I look up woman, one of the meanings is wife. Does than mean I can
refer to my wife as my woman?

One of the usage examples they give for lady is "ask that lady over
there", which I totally agree with. It sounds so wrong telling someone
to "ask that woman over there". "Ask that man over there", however,
sounds fine.

Bring back gentlewoman, that's what I say


One of the police officers involved in the tragic events in Woolwich
the other day was referred to in the newspapers as a "female
marksman". To avoid causing offence, should they have referred to her
instead as a marksperson, markswoman, or markslady?

Rod.
  #23  
Old May 24th 13, 10:17 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,968
Default Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker

In message , Roderick
Stewart writes
On Fri, 24 May 2013 10:56:39 +0100, Andy
wrote:

Sara wrote:

For anyone who prefers an electric one, mine's so old it isn't listed
any more, but it's pretty much this jobbie:
http://www.arrowstaples.co.uk/arret5...ectric-t50-sta
ple-gun.html


Do you use it to staple Rog's ears to the floor if he says 'lady'?

Bill

Only in a situation where he wouldn't say 'gentleman' to man ;-)

Oops. I just sent this directlty to Sara rather then the group. Sorry Sara.

I've just got around to looking up lady in my dictionary (Concise
Oxford). One of the meanings of lady is a woman.

If I look up woman, one of the meanings is wife. Does than mean I can
refer to my wife as my woman?

One of the usage examples they give for lady is "ask that lady over
there", which I totally agree with. It sounds so wrong telling someone
to "ask that woman over there". "Ask that man over there", however,
sounds fine.

Bring back gentlewoman, that's what I say


One of the police officers involved in the tragic events in Woolwich
the other day was referred to in the newspapers as a "female
marksman". To avoid causing offence, should they have referred to her
instead as a marksperson, markswoman, or markslady?

This is one of those occasions when 'The Chair'* needs to rule on such
matters.
*Yeuch!
--
Ian
  #24  
Old May 24th 13, 10:34 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,381
Default Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker

Andy wrote:

Bring back gentlewoman, that's what I say

Absolutely. And in many years' time when Sara is old enough to have
incontinence problems, will she go to the shop and ask for a packet of
TennaWoman?

Bill
  #25  
Old May 24th 13, 11:21 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,707
Default Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker

In message , Roderick
Stewart writes
On Fri, 24 May 2013 10:56:39 +0100, Andy
wrote:

Sara wrote:

For anyone who prefers an electric one, mine's so old it isn't listed
any more, but it's pretty much this jobbie:
http://www.arrowstaples.co.uk/arret5...ectric-t50-sta
ple-gun.html


Do you use it to staple Rog's ears to the floor if he says 'lady'?

Bill

Only in a situation where he wouldn't say 'gentleman' to man ;-)

Oops. I just sent this directlty to Sara rather then the group. Sorry Sara.

I've just got around to looking up lady in my dictionary (Concise
Oxford). One of the meanings of lady is a woman.

If I look up woman, one of the meanings is wife. Does than mean I can
refer to my wife as my woman?

One of the usage examples they give for lady is "ask that lady over
there", which I totally agree with. It sounds so wrong telling someone
to "ask that woman over there". "Ask that man over there", however,
sounds fine.

Bring back gentlewoman, that's what I say


One of the police officers involved in the tragic events in Woolwich
the other day was referred to in the newspapers as a "female
marksman". To avoid causing offence, should they have referred to her
instead as a marksperson, markswoman, or markslady?

Rod.


They should have said "armed police officer", but that doesn't fit
because she was being singled out as a woman.
--
Ian
  #26  
Old May 24th 13, 11:53 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Sara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 56
Default Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker

In article ,
Andy wrote:

On 23/05/2013 12:06, Sara wrote:
In article ,
Bill Wright wrote:

Sara wrote:

For anyone who prefers an electric one, mine's so old it isn't listed
any more, but it's pretty much this jobbie:
http://www.arrowstaples.co.uk/arret5...ectric-t50-sta
ple-gun.html


Do you use it to staple Rog's ears to the floor if he says 'lady'?

Bill


Only in a situation where he wouldn't say 'gentleman' to man ;-)

Oops. I just sent this directlty to Sara rather then the group. Sorry Sara.

I've just got around to looking up lady in my dictionary (Concise
Oxford). One of the meanings of lady is a woman.

If I look up woman, one of the meanings is wife. Does than mean I can
refer to my wife as my woman?

One of the usage examples they give for lady is "ask that lady over
there", which I totally agree with. It sounds so wrong telling someone
to "ask that woman over there". "Ask that man over there", however,
sounds fine.

Bring back gentlewoman, that's what I say


No probs - I saw the email and assumed it was a whoops moment.

--
Sara

cats cats cats cats cats
  #27  
Old May 24th 13, 12:42 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
S Viemeister[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 130
Default Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker

On 5/24/2013 6:07 AM, Roderick Stewart wrote:

One of the police officers involved in the tragic events in Woolwich
the other day was referred to in the newspapers as a "female
marksman". To avoid causing offence, should they have referred to her
instead as a marksperson, markswoman, or markslady?

Female sharpshooter?

  #28  
Old May 24th 13, 06:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
mully
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker

S Viemeister wrote:
On 5/24/2013 6:07 AM, Roderick Stewart wrote:

One of the police officers involved in the tragic events in Woolwich
the other day was referred to in the newspapers as a "female
marksman". To avoid causing offence, should they have referred to her
instead as a marksperson, markswoman, or markslady?

Female sharpshooter?

Or female sniper
Some years ago in a discussion on R4'Woman's Hour, the presenter was
struggling with batsm.. Um bat.. Um batswoman and never came close to
batter.

John


--
jtm from his iPad
  #29  
Old May 24th 13, 07:50 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,003
Default Such a thing as a CT100 coax tacker

On Fri, 24 May 2013 13:28:23 +0100, brightside S9
wrote:

I think that in some situations womyn is preferable to woman. :-)


No it isn't. It's a linguistic abomination.

Rod.
 




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