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Thousands hit by HD TV chaos



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 12th 06, 12:52 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NO One
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

Thousands hit by HD TV chaos.

(From The Sunday Times)

Many of the high-definition televisions sold prior to the World Cup
still cannot receive the right signals and consumers face months of
hassle to get the technology.

THOUSANDS of consumers who rushed to buy expensive high-definition
televisions ahead of last summer’s World Cup may have been left
short-changed because their sets cannot receive a signal.

It is estimated that about 5% of the 2m or so TV sets that were sold
as “HD ready” by retailers, such as Dixons and Currys, until this year
came without the current industry standard sockets, according to NTL
Telewest. This meant they could not be connected with the set-top
boxes supplied by Sky and Telewest, the two main HD providers, and
consumers could not receive the high-definition pictures they had been
promised.

Their TVs, which typically cost £1,000, are therefore virtually
redundant unless they spend more money on new equipment or months of
wrangling with engineers.

The problems arose because some older “HD ready” TVs came only with
what is known as a digital visual interface (DVI) socket, rather than
the current industry standard called high-definition multimedia
interface (HDMI). The latter incorporates certain copy-protection
features needed to decode the latest HD programmes.

Set-top boxes from Telewest and Sky, however, connect only with HDMI
sockets.

Aizad Hussain, a former group director of NTL, who was involved in
introducing broadband to Britain, spent £7,000 on a 51in Fujitsu
plasma television set in 2003. However, it did not have an HDMI input
and Hussain was forced to bin the equipment because it was redundant.

Hussain said: “Why was I sold a TV for £7,000 that doesn’t accept
HDMI? Now you can’t even buy an HD-ready TV without HMDI. I thought I
was getting something future-proof when it said HD TV, but clearly I
wasn’t.”

Fujitsu was unable to respond to requests made by The Sunday Times.

Cerian Whiting, a teacher from London, bought a Philips 32in HD-ready
TV in December for £1,000. When she got it home, she realised the TV
only had a DVI socket, so she bought a £60 cable to convert the HDMI
signal from her Telewest set-top box to DVI — but this did not work.

Whiting said: “A Telewest engineer came to see if I was doing anything
wrong and checked all the equipment, but he told me he couldn’t fix
the problem.”

Whiting complained to Philips, but it was unable to solve the matter —
until the intervention of The Sunday Times last week. A Philips
engineer suddenly offered a solution by using an analogue “component”
cable and a digital converter. However, this reduced the quality of
the HD signal she received. “It’s a compromise, and I didn’t spend
that much money to compromise. The TV was in no way HD-ready despite
being billed as such.”

Philips said a converter cable would not automatically be provided by
the manufacturer but if there were problems with the connection, an
engineer would be sent to investigate.

Tony Graziano, a spokesman for the European Information,
Communications and Consumer Electronics Technology Industry
Associations (Ecita), the European body that grants the HD-ready logo,
said there had been problems across Europe with TVs not being
compatible with HD signal boxes.

He said it was an Ecita requirement that manufacturers provide both an
analogue and a digital connection for high definition. “If
manufacturers provide only one physical connector they should provide
either a connector and converter with the television, or they should
inform the consumer that in order to receive HD content, they need to
have additional components which should not be too expensive,” he
said.

Since this year, HDMI labels have featured alongside the HD-ready logo
on most new TVs. Major retailers such as Dixons and Currys have
stopped selling DVI-only sets.

Philips said Whiting’s case was an isolated one, and that there were
examples of successful connections between HDMI and DVI. The company
admitted, however, that Whiting would not be able to receive the
highest-quality HD signal by using an analogue cable.

Last year, 10% of Philips HD-ready TVs did not have HDMI sockets but
now all new HD-ready Philips TVs have HDMI.

Richard Bourne from NTL Telewest said a number of people had had
compatibility problems with Philips TVs.

Philips said that its customer helpline service should be able to
resolve any compatibility problems with old TV sets.



  #2  
Old November 12th 06, 02:55 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
housetrained
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 150
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

"NO One" wrote in message
...
Thousands hit by HD TV chaos.

(From The Sunday Times)

Many of the high-definition televisions sold prior to the World Cup
still cannot receive the right signals and consumers face months of
hassle to get the technology.

THOUSANDS of consumers who rushed to buy expensive high-definition
televisions ahead of last summer's World Cup may have been left
short-changed because their sets cannot receive a signal.

It is estimated that about 5% of the 2m or so TV sets that were sold
as "HD ready" by retailers, such as Dixons and Currys, until this year
came without the current industry standard sockets, according to NTL
Telewest. This meant they could not be connected with the set-top
boxes supplied by Sky and Telewest, the two main HD providers, and
consumers could not receive the high-definition pictures they had been
promised.

Their TVs, which typically cost £1,000, are therefore virtually
redundant unless they spend more money on new equipment or months of
wrangling with engineers.

The problems arose because some older "HD ready" TVs came only with
what is known as a digital visual interface (DVI) socket, rather than
the current industry standard called high-definition multimedia
interface (HDMI). The latter incorporates certain copy-protection
features needed to decode the latest HD programmes.

Set-top boxes from Telewest and Sky, however, connect only with HDMI
sockets.

Aizad Hussain, a former group director of NTL, who was involved in
introducing broadband to Britain, spent £7,000 on a 51in Fujitsu
plasma television set in 2003. However, it did not have an HDMI input
and Hussain was forced to bin the equipment because it was redundant.

Hussain said: "Why was I sold a TV for £7,000 that doesn't accept
HDMI? Now you can't even buy an HD-ready TV without HMDI. I thought I
was getting something future-proof when it said HD TV, but clearly I
wasn't."

Fujitsu was unable to respond to requests made by The Sunday Times.

Cerian Whiting, a teacher from London, bought a Philips 32in HD-ready
TV in December for £1,000. When she got it home, she realised the TV
only had a DVI socket, so she bought a £60 cable to convert the HDMI
signal from her Telewest set-top box to DVI - but this did not work.

Whiting said: "A Telewest engineer came to see if I was doing anything
wrong and checked all the equipment, but he told me he couldn't fix
the problem."

Whiting complained to Philips, but it was unable to solve the matter -
until the intervention of The Sunday Times last week. A Philips
engineer suddenly offered a solution by using an analogue "component"
cable and a digital converter. However, this reduced the quality of
the HD signal she received. "It's a compromise, and I didn't spend
that much money to compromise. The TV was in no way HD-ready despite
being billed as such."

Philips said a converter cable would not automatically be provided by
the manufacturer but if there were problems with the connection, an
engineer would be sent to investigate.

Tony Graziano, a spokesman for the European Information,
Communications and Consumer Electronics Technology Industry
Associations (Ecita), the European body that grants the HD-ready logo,
said there had been problems across Europe with TVs not being
compatible with HD signal boxes.

He said it was an Ecita requirement that manufacturers provide both an
analogue and a digital connection for high definition. "If
manufacturers provide only one physical connector they should provide
either a connector and converter with the television, or they should
inform the consumer that in order to receive HD content, they need to
have additional components which should not be too expensive," he
said.

Since this year, HDMI labels have featured alongside the HD-ready logo
on most new TVs. Major retailers such as Dixons and Currys have
stopped selling DVI-only sets.

Philips said Whiting's case was an isolated one, and that there were
examples of successful connections between HDMI and DVI. The company
admitted, however, that Whiting would not be able to receive the
highest-quality HD signal by using an analogue cable.

Last year, 10% of Philips HD-ready TVs did not have HDMI sockets but
now all new HD-ready Philips TVs have HDMI.

Richard Bourne from NTL Telewest said a number of people had had
compatibility problems with Philips TVs.

Philips said that its customer helpline service should be able to
resolve any compatibility problems with old TV sets.



We had the same problems when the first Zeppelins came out!

--
John the West Ham fan




  #3  
Old November 12th 06, 06:26 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,418
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos


"NO One" wrote in message
...

It is estimated that about 5% of the 2m or so TV sets that were sold
as "HD ready" by retailers, such as Dixons and Currys, until this year
came without the current industry standard sockets, according to NTL
Telewest. This meant they could not be connected with the set-top
boxes supplied by Sky and Telewest, the two main HD providers, and
consumers could not receive the high-definition pictures they had been
promised.



Yes that is often the case when the cart is before the horse.

I'm waiting untill the main broadcasters have started terrestrial
transmissions of HD before I buy, been burnt a few times before myself with
other products being out of date a year or so old.

--
Regards,
David

Please reply to News Group


  #4  
Old November 12th 06, 08:07 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,568
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

NO One wrote:

Aizad Hussain, a former group director of NTL, who was involved in
introducing broadband to Britain, spent £7,000 on a 51in Fujitsu
plasma television set in 2003. However, it did not have an HDMI input
and Hussain was forced to bin the equipment because it was redundant.

Hussain said: “Why was I sold a TV for £7,000 that doesn’t accept
HDMI? Now you can’t even buy an HD-ready TV without HMDI. I thought I
was getting something future-proof when it said HD TV, but clearly I
wasn’t.”


Not very clued up about his own industry then was he ?


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #5  
Old November 12th 06, 08:28 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Fraser (News)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 79
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

In article ,
NO One wrote:


[Snip]

The problems arose because some older 'HD ready' TVs came only with what
is known as a digital visual interface (DVI) socket, rather than the
current industry standard called high-definition multimedia interface
(HDMI). The latter incorporates certain copy-protection features needed
to decode the latest HD programmes.


Am I the only one who hates the phrase 'Industry Standard'? What industry?
It means absolutely nothing.

--
___________________________________________
|\ /| ark Fraser
| \/ | Somerset /www.mfraz.freeserve.co.uk
| |__________/Acorn SA RISC PC You know what the sig means!
  #6  
Old November 12th 06, 08:54 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dr Zoidberg
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 114
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

NO One wrote:
Thousands hit by HD TV chaos.

Aizad Hussain, a former group director of NTL, who was involved in
introducing broadband to Britain, spent £7,000 on a 51in Fujitsu
plasma television set in 2003. However, it did not have an HDMI input
and Hussain was forced to bin the equipment because it was redundant.

Hussain said: "Why was I sold a TV for £7,000 that doesn't accept
HDMI? Now you can't even buy an HD-ready TV without HMDI. I thought I
was getting something future-proof when it said HD TV, but clearly I
wasn't."


When was the HD Ready standard that includes HDMI inputs established?

You can hardly blame Fujitsu for making sets without if it was before this
was a definite requirement
--
Alex

"I laugh in the face of danger. Then I hide until it goes away"

www.drzoidberg.co.uk www.ebayfaq.co.uk


  #7  
Old November 12th 06, 08:59 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,418
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos


"Dr Zoidberg" wrote in message
...

You can hardly blame Fujitsu for making sets without if it was before this
was a definite requirement


If not them, Currys/Comet for selling them to the unsuspecting UK public?

--
Regards,
David

Please reply to News Group


  #8  
Old November 12th 06, 09:30 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dr Zoidberg
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 114
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

David wrote:
"Dr Zoidberg" wrote in message
...

You can hardly blame Fujitsu for making sets without if it was
before this was a definite requirement


If not them, Currys/Comet for selling them to the unsuspecting UK
public?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HD-ready
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HDMI

Ok , it seems that HDMI interfaces weren't introduced until 2004 and weren't
included as part of the HD ready standard until 2005.
It's difficult to see how manufacturers and retailers can have been at fault
for selling a set without HDMI in 2003.

I totally agree that they shouldn't be selling sets now without HDMI unless
they make the limitations abundantly clear but that's not always been the
case

--
Alex

"I laugh in the face of danger. Then I hide until it goes away"

www.drzoidberg.co.uk www.ebayfaq.co.uk


  #9  
Old November 12th 06, 10:27 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham Murray
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 225
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

"Dr Zoidberg" writes:

Ok , it seems that HDMI interfaces weren't introduced until 2004 and weren't
included as part of the HD ready standard until 2005.
It's difficult to see how manufacturers and retailers can have been at fault
for selling a set without HDMI in 2003.


But it is easy to see how the blame can be attached to whoever
re-defined the HD standard so as to make it incompatible with sets
build to the existing 'HD Ready' standard.
  #10  
Old November 12th 06, 12:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Farrance
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,551
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

Graham Murray wrote:

"Dr Zoidberg" writes:

Ok , it seems that HDMI interfaces weren't introduced until 2004 and weren't
included as part of the HD ready standard until 2005.
It's difficult to see how manufacturers and retailers can have been at fault
for selling a set without HDMI in 2003.


But it is easy to see how the blame can be attached to whoever
re-defined the HD standard so as to make it incompatible with sets
build to the existing 'HD Ready' standard.


In principle, a DVI socket should have been perfectly acceptable since
all you should need is an HDMI-to-DVI adaptor plug and a separate
connection for the audio. I guess that many those DVI inputs turned out
to be partially dysfunctional, or that there was a bug in the HDCP
decoding. Maybe ECITA realised that those manufacturers that couldn't be
arsed to put in HDMI sockets also tended to be slack in other aspects of
their implementation, so ECITA decided to disallow the DVI socket to
force them to pull their socks up.

--
Dave Farrance
 




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