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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

Thousands hit by HD TV chaos



 
 
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  #21  
Old November 12th 06, 05:07 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
John Howells
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Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos


"Mark Carver" wrote

DAB sounds worse than FM wrote:

There will be enough bandwidth after analogue switch-off to provide a

few HD
channels on Freeview - total DTT capacity is going from 120 Mbps to 192
Mbps, so some of that could be used for HD channels.


I think you mean from 144 (6 x 24) to 192 (8 x 24) ?


No, he meant what he said. 120 ( 4 x 18 + 2 x 24 ) to 192 ( 8 x 24 ), as
only two of the MPXs are currently QAM64, carrying 24Mb/s, while the other
four are QAM16, and carry only 18Mb/s.

John Howells


  #22  
Old November 12th 06, 05:17 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

John Howells wrote:
"Mark Carver" wrote

DAB sounds worse than FM wrote:

There will be enough bandwidth after analogue switch-off to provide a

few HD
channels on Freeview - total DTT capacity is going from 120 Mbps to 192
Mbps, so some of that could be used for HD channels.

I think you mean from 144 (6 x 24) to 192 (8 x 24) ?


No, he meant what he said. 120 ( 4 x 18 + 2 x 24 ) to 192 ( 8 x 24 ), as
only two of the MPXs are currently QAM64, carrying 24Mb/s, while the other
four are QAM16, and carry only 18Mb/s.


Ah yes, my mistake.


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #23  
Old November 12th 06, 05:21 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Thack
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Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

Sky do not own a single satellite. Anyone who wants to launch an SD or HD
service can by renting transponders from Astra or Eurobird.


OK, but you know what I meant! My point was that HD TV isn't going to be
cheap for the broadcasters, and therefore realistically it will have to be
funded by subscriptions, rather than Freeview or Freesat.

Thack


  #24  
Old November 12th 06, 05:22 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Thack
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Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

There will be enough bandwidth after analogue switch-off to provide a few
HD channels on Freeview - total DTT capacity is going from 120 Mbps to 192
Mbps, so some of that could be used for HD channels.


A few. But bandwidth costs the broadcasters money, which is why I think all
HD content will be subscription-only for the forseeable future.

Thack


  #25  
Old November 12th 06, 05:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Thack
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Posts: 27
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

The BBC are unlikely to become subscription based.

I agree, and therefore I suspect they'll put out very little, if any, HD
content other than trials. Bandwidth costs money.

Thack


  #26  
Old November 12th 06, 05:40 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

Thack wrote:
Sky do not own a single satellite. Anyone who wants to launch an SD or HD
service can by renting transponders from Astra or Eurobird.


OK, but you know what I meant!


Fair enough but there are plenty of people (some who should know better)
that seem to imagine any domestic satellite transmission must fully involve
Sky, and that even the satellites at 28E are theirs. While it's true to say
that the vast majority of satellite receivers in the UK are Sky Digiboxes
running Sky's propriety EPG, it is certainly not the case that Sky have to
handle uplink facilities for any broadcaster on Sky's EPG. Any self
respecting broadcaster (BBC, ITV, C4, Viacom, Discovery) make their own
arrangements.

My point was that HD TV isn't going to be
cheap for the broadcasters, and therefore realistically it will have to be
funded by subscriptions, rather than Freeview or Freesat.


Bear in mind that the BBC hope to produce nearly all of their programming in
HD by 2011. Studio 1 (Come Dancing, Children in Need, Red Nose Day etc) at
TV Centre is now HD equipped, and AIUI the other studios there are following
suit.


--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #27  
Old November 12th 06, 06:21 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ben
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Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

Mark Carver wrote:
NO One wrote:

Aizad Hussain, a former group director of NTL, who was involved in
introducing broadband to Britain, spent £7,000 on a 51in Fujitsu
plasma television set in 2003. However, it did not have an HDMI input
and Hussain was forced to bin the equipment because it was redundant.
Hussain said: “Why was I sold a TV for £7,000 that doesn’t accept
HDMI? Now you can’t even buy an HD-ready TV without HMDI. I thought I
was getting something future-proof when it said HD TV, but clearly I
wasn’t.”


Not very clued up about his own industry then was he ?


Are we surprised though? I've worked in enough technical organisations
to know that the managers / board members know less than the average man
in the street about the technical aspects of what the organisation does
and don't consider it their job to know. Its a real kick in the teeth
for the employees when these idiots make bad decisions and you know its
from a position of utter ignorance.
  #28  
Old November 12th 06, 06:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Farrance
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Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

Toshiba's "second generation" HD-DVD player, the HD-XA2, going on sale
in the US shortly, is going to feature 1080p (1080-lines, progressive
encoding). So with the competition between formats being as strong as it
is, I expect that'll become a standard feature in fairly short order.
Which probably means that the first HD players to hit the UK will be
1080i/720p followed just a few months later by 1080p. Then all those
people that bought 1080i/720p "HD-ready" tellys will have something else
to complain about.

--
Dave Farrance
  #29  
Old November 12th 06, 08:04 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Michael Chare
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Posts: 856
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

"DAB sounds worse than FM" wrote in message
...
Dr Zoidberg wrote:
David wrote:
"Dr Zoidberg" wrote in message
...

You can hardly blame Fujitsu for making sets without if it was
before this was a definite requirement

If not them, Currys/Comet for selling them to the unsuspecting UK
public?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HD-ready
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HDMI

Ok , it seems that HDMI interfaces weren't introduced until 2004 and
weren't included as part of the HD ready standard until 2005.



And it says on the Wiki page that term 'HD-Ready' only became officially
recognised by Jan 2005, so the TV sets that these people are saying were
claimed to be "HD-Ready" almost certainly didn't have a label on saying so.

IMO, it's Sky and NTL's fault for forcing people to have HDMI - not the
retailers' nor the manufacturers' fault.


But is that in fact the case? Have Sky stopped supply HD STBs with component
connections


From the Sky HD FAQ:

"How will the Sky HD box connect to my TV?

Your Sky HD box comes with an HDMI cable, which delivers the best possible
picture quality by maintaining an all-digital connection. Most new HD ready TVs
come with HDMI connectors, but if yours only has a DVI connection, you can
connect it to the Sky HD box using a suitable adapter connector. Initial Sky HD
boxes will also have analogue component connections to support older TVs".


--

Michael Chare







  #30  
Old November 12th 06, 08:37 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Sanddancer
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Posts: 4
Default Thousands hit by HD TV chaos

On Sun, 12 Nov 2006 07:26:27 GMT, "David"
wrote:


"NO One" wrote in message
.. .

It is estimated that about 5% of the 2m or so TV sets that were sold
as "HD ready" by retailers, such as Dixons and Currys, until this year
came without the current industry standard sockets, according to NTL
Telewest. This meant they could not be connected with the set-top
boxes supplied by Sky and Telewest, the two main HD providers, and
consumers could not receive the high-definition pictures they had been
promised.



Yes that is often the case when the cart is before the horse.

I'm waiting untill the main broadcasters have started terrestrial
transmissions of HD before I buy, been burnt a few times before myself with
other products being out of date a year or so old.


I'm still seeing new stuff broadcasted that's not even in widescreen!
The only reasons I'm tempted to buy a HD TV is for my Xbox 360, to
free up a little space & get a bigger screen than I have now. Most of
the stuff on TV is rubbish at the moment and HD isn't going to make
that any better.
 




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