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uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

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  #21  
Old October 8th 06, 10:58 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Rod L.
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Posts: 32
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"Scott" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 06 Oct 2006 16:37:41 GMT, "Rod L."
wrote:

Has anyone else noticed stronger colours on BBC1 than any other channel
(Analogue). The Blues and Reds are very strong. I'm receiving from Sandy
Heath and notice this on all our TV's in the house. DVB-T is fine.

Rod.

I find BBC News 24 very red on Freeview, particularly the skin tones
of the studio presenters. Has anyone else noticed this?

Scott

Yes I've noticed this. The background set on the J.Ross show is another
example. This colour scheme appears to change from show to show. The
lip-sync problem associated with the BBC is much the same. I watching the
England post match discussion and noticed some really bad lip-sync however
as soon as Robin Hood started the problem went away.


  #22  
Old October 8th 06, 11:04 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
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Posts: 7,576
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Rod L. wrote:

Yes I've noticed this. The background set on the J.Ross show is another
example. This colour scheme appears to change from show to show. The
lip-sync problem associated with the BBC is much the same. I watching the
England post match discussion and noticed some really bad lip-sync however
as soon as Robin Hood started the problem went away.


For you it might have done, but.........

http://groups.google.co.uk/group/uk.tech.broadcast/browse_frm/thread/7ff973072c261111/96eb18e94871a0fb?hl=en#96eb18e94871a0fb

:-)

--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #23  
Old October 8th 06, 03:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
DB
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Posts: 168
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I believe there to be an argument that the plural of an abbreviation
should contain an apostrophe. The argument is that the apostrophe
represents missing letters. In the above example the apostrophe would
therefore represent the missing letters 'ision'.


but to carry out your belief to the full, you need to use T'V's.

The first apostophe standing for "ele".


Of course I noticed that as I wrote. The point I was making related
to the representation of the plural form rather than the contraction
of television to TV. I have heard it argued that this is a legitimate
use of an apostrophe and I wondered what Mr P thought.

Scott


It's quite simple really; the apostrophe should never be used with plurals,
even when there is an abbreviation. The only cases where an apostrophe
should be used are where a letter, or letters, are omitted (can't, don't,
it's etc) or where possession is denoted (Fred's TVs, the dog's bone, etc,
or in the case of there being more than one dog, the dogs' bone). The
possessive form of 'it' does not contain and apostrophe - i.e. it's 'its'.


  #24  
Old October 8th 06, 04:54 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Scott
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On Sun, 8 Oct 2006 15:41:34 +0100, "dB" wrote:

I believe there to be an argument that the plural of an abbreviation
should contain an apostrophe. The argument is that the apostrophe
represents missing letters. In the above example the apostrophe would
therefore represent the missing letters 'ision'.

but to carry out your belief to the full, you need to use T'V's.

The first apostophe standing for "ele".


Of course I noticed that as I wrote. The point I was making related
to the representation of the plural form rather than the contraction
of television to TV. I have heard it argued that this is a legitimate
use of an apostrophe and I wondered what Mr P thought.

Scott


It's quite simple really; the apostrophe should never be used with plurals,
even when there is an abbreviation. The only cases where an apostrophe
should be used are where a letter, or letters, are omitted (can't, don't,
it's etc) or where possession is denoted (Fred's TVs, the dog's bone, etc,
or in the case of there being more than one dog, the dogs' bone). The
possessive form of 'it' does not contain and apostrophe - i.e. it's 'its'.

What about dot your i's and cross your t's? Should this be dot your
is?

Generally I agree with you though

Scott
  #25  
Old October 8th 06, 05:46 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Farrance
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Posts: 1,551
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"dB" wrote:

It's quite simple really; the apostrophe should never be used with plurals,
even when there is an abbreviation.


In the UK, in *recent* years, it has become common practice not to use
apostrophes with the plurals of capitalised abbreviations, but in the
USA, it still seems to be accepted practice to add an apostrophe.

By the way, the apostrophe can be used for the following as well:

To indicate time or quantity. e.g. "In one week's time".

In the USA, plural dates usually have apostrophes. e.g. "1980's"

Plurals of letters. e.g. "How many B's in Britain?".

--
Dave Farrance





  #26  
Old October 8th 06, 10:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
DB
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Posts: 168
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What about dot your i's and cross your t's? Should this be dot your
is?


Of course, every rule has an exception, and this is one of them. In this
case, having an apostrophe makes the meaning clear.


  #27  
Old October 8th 06, 10:45 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
DB
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Posts: 168
Default BBC1 Colour


In the UK, in *recent* years, it has become common practice not to use
apostrophes with the plurals of capitalised abbreviations, but in the
USA, it still seems to be accepted practice to add an apostrophe.


Define recent. It's certainly never been correct to use an apostrophe on
plurals in this situation in my lifetime.


By the way, the apostrophe can be used for the following as well:

To indicate time or quantity. e.g. "In one week's time".


This comes under the possessive category; the amount of time belonging to a
week.


In the USA, plural dates usually have apostrophes. e.g. "1980's"

Plurals of letters. e.g. "How many B's in Britain?".


In this case, yes an apostrophe is acceptable in order to make the meaning
unambiguous.


  #28  
Old October 9th 06, 09:47 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Paul Schofield
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Posts: 85
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"dB" wrote in message
...

In the UK, in *recent* years, it has become common practice not to use
apostrophes with the plurals of capitalised abbreviations, but in the
USA, it still seems to be accepted practice to add an apostrophe.


Define recent. It's certainly never been correct to use an apostrophe on
plurals in this situation in my lifetime.


I was taught at school to use an apostrophe for plurals of words derived
from initial letters e.g. MP's, CD's etc. This usage is not considered the
norm nowadays, but is still technically correct - as is the usage without
the apostrophe. Pure supposition follows - perhaps the use of these type of
initials originally had full stops between the letters i.e. M.P. so the
plural becomes M.P's with the apostrophe showing the missing full stop?

Incidentally the use in American shows that this is the traditional form as
much of their version of the language has evolved less quickly than ours.

--
Paul Schofield



  #29  
Old October 9th 06, 02:02 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Dave Farrance
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Posts: 1,551
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"dB" wrote:

To indicate time or quantity. e.g. "In one week's time".


This comes under the possessive category; the amount of time belonging to a
week.


The sentence structure might lead you to assume that - but you'll find
that idea is a bit shaky if you think about the permutations of the
above. Actually, the "week" is the unit by which the time is measured.
By the same rule, apostrophes should also be used in the following:
"Four yards' worth" or "Two weeks' notice".

--
Dave Farrance
 




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