A Sky, cable and digital tv forum. Digital TV Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Digital TV Banter forum » Digital TV Newsgroups » uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.tech.digital-tv (Digital TV - General) (uk.tech.digital-tv) Discussion of all matters technical in origin related to the reception of digital television transmissions, be they via satellite, terrestrial or cable. Advertising is forbidden, with no exceptions.

BBC1 Colour



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old October 7th 06, 02:00 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Ian Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 260
Default BBC1 Colour

In message , Dickie mint
writes
Mark Carver wrote:
Rod L. wrote:

Has anyone else noticed stronger colours on BBC1 than any other
channel (Analogue). The Blues and Reds are very strong. I'm receiving
from Sandy Heath and notice this on all our TV's in the house. DVB-T

Yes, last week on a visit to the Sudbury area. It me prompted to
post the following in uk.tech.broadcast:-
I've just returned from a couple of days deep inside Sudbury's
service area.
I was only watching on a hotel TV, but the RF system feeding it
certainly seemed to be well set up. All four main channels were noise
free and clean.
However there was something wrong with network BBC 1 pictures. The
chroma level was too high, or the luminance was too low, or the chroma
level was normal, but the burst was too low. I'd have assumed it was
was a reception fault, had it not been for the fact that local opts
from Norwich were fine.
Well, not quite a clean sheet because the audio was distorted, but
network audio was fine.
Sudbury AIUI is RBL fed from Taccy, so I assume Taccy will be
affected too (but perhaps not Sandy Heath 'coz there's some
jiggery-pokery there for the Cambridge opt ?)
Anyway, none of my business really, but if I were BBC Norwich I'd
get some test kit out and do some measurements :-)
(BBC 2, ITV, and 4 were all fine)

I did email my Narrwitch contacts, with no reply. They may well have
been made redundant now!

The transmitter AFR should report out of limit chrominance and
luminance of course!


Perhaps it's an attempt to make up for the poor colour quality of the
latest-and-greatest flat screen TV sets.
Ian.
--

  #12  
Old October 7th 06, 02:23 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default BBC1 Colour

On Sat, 7 Oct 2006 14:00:43 +0100, Ian Jackson
wrote:

Perhaps it's an attempt to make up for the poor colour quality of the
latest-and-greatest flat screen TV sets.


No, it makes them look even worse.

--
Steve Wolstenholme Neural Planner Software

EasyNN-plus. The easy way to build neural networks.
http://www.easynn.com
  #13  
Old October 7th 06, 03:41 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mark Carver
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,578
Default BBC1 Colour

Dickie mint wrote:
Mark Carver wrote:



Anyway, none of my business really, but if I were BBC Norwich I'd get
some test kit out and do some measurements :-)

(BBC 2, ITV, and 4 were all fine)

I did email my Narrwitch contacts, with no reply. They may well have
been made redundant now!

The transmitter AFR should report out of limit chrominance and luminance
of course!


Thanks Dickie.

There does seem to be an on going problem in that region. ISTR last Easter
watching Sandy Heath up there, analogue satellite style 'sparklies' on
saturated reds on BBC 1 analogue. That, according to posts in u.t.b, was
down to a poorly aligned codec in the chain somewhere.

--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  #14  
Old October 7th 06, 07:11 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Mizter T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 192
Default BBC1 Colour

Rod L. wrote:

Has anyone else noticed stronger colours on BBC1 than any other channel
(Analogue). The Blues and Reds are very strong. I'm receiving from Sandy
Heath and notice this on all our TV's in the house. DVB-T is fine.

Rod.


From the subject line I thought I'd enetered a timewarp - I was

expecting some question along the lines of when the BBC1 on colour was
coming to Cumbria or something!

  #15  
Old October 7th 06, 07:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 867
Default BBC1 Colour

On Fri, 6 Oct 2006 18:52:26 +0100, "John Porcella"
wrote:

I'm receiving from Sandy
Heath and notice this on all our TV's in the house.


All your TV's what?


I believe there to be an argument that the plural of an abbreviation
should contain an apostrophe. The argument is that the apostrophe
represents missing letters. In the above example the apostrophe would
therefore represent the missing letters 'ision'. As you are clearly a
linguistic expert, I would be interested to know whether there is much
support for this argument in academic circles. Indeed, a short thesis
on the role and function of the apostrophe in the contemporary English
language would no doubt inform us all.

Scott
  #16  
Old October 7th 06, 07:30 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 867
Default BBC1 Colour

On Fri, 06 Oct 2006 16:37:41 GMT, "Rod L."
wrote:

Has anyone else noticed stronger colours on BBC1 than any other channel
(Analogue). The Blues and Reds are very strong. I'm receiving from Sandy
Heath and notice this on all our TV's in the house. DVB-T is fine.

Rod.

I find BBC News 24 very red on Freeview, particularly the skin tones
of the studio presenters. Has anyone else noticed this?

Scott
  #17  
Old October 7th 06, 07:38 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
charles
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,016
Default BBC1 Colour

In article ,
Scott wrote:
On Fri, 6 Oct 2006 18:52:26 +0100, "John Porcella"
wrote:


I'm receiving from Sandy
Heath and notice this on all our TV's in the house.


All your TV's what?


I believe there to be an argument that the plural of an abbreviation
should contain an apostrophe. The argument is that the apostrophe
represents missing letters. In the above example the apostrophe would
therefore represent the missing letters 'ision'.


but to carry out your belief to the full, you need to use T'V's.

The first apostophe standing for "ele".

--
From KT24 - in "Leafy Surrey"

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.11

  #18  
Old October 8th 06, 12:31 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 867
Default BBC1 Colour

On Sat, 07 Oct 2006 19:38:30 +0100, charles
wrote:

In article ,
Scott wrote:
On Fri, 6 Oct 2006 18:52:26 +0100, "John Porcella"
wrote:


I'm receiving from Sandy
Heath and notice this on all our TV's in the house.

All your TV's what?


I believe there to be an argument that the plural of an abbreviation
should contain an apostrophe. The argument is that the apostrophe
represents missing letters. In the above example the apostrophe would
therefore represent the missing letters 'ision'.


but to carry out your belief to the full, you need to use T'V's.

The first apostophe standing for "ele".


Of course I noticed that as I wrote. The point I was making related
to the representation of the plural form rather than the contraction
of television to TV. I have heard it argued that this is a legitimate
use of an apostrophe and I wondered what Mr P thought.

Scott
  #19  
Old October 8th 06, 01:45 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Bill Wright
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,408
Default BBC1 Colour


"Scott" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 6 Oct 2006 18:52:26 +0100, "John Porcella"
wrote:

I'm receiving from Sandy
Heath and notice this on all our TV's in the house.


All your TV's what?


I believe there to be an argument that the plural of an abbreviation
should contain an apostrophe. The argument is that the apostrophe
represents missing letters. In the above example the apostrophe would
therefore represent the missing letters 'ision'. As you are clearly a
linguistic expert, I would be interested to know whether there is much
support for this argument in academic circles. Indeed, a short thesis
on the role and function of the apostrophe in the contemporary English
language would no doubt inform us all.


Yeah, go for it Johnny Boy! Let's hear the real intellectual full dog's
******** from you! You must be bustin' out all over wiv your erudition!

Bill


  #20  
Old October 8th 06, 10:08 AM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
harrogate3
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 219
Default BBC1 Colour


"Bill Wright" wrote in message
...

"Scott" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 6 Oct 2006 18:52:26 +0100, "John Porcella"
wrote:

I'm receiving from Sandy
Heath and notice this on all our TV's in the house.

All your TV's what?


I believe there to be an argument that the plural of an

abbreviation
should contain an apostrophe. The argument is that the apostrophe
represents missing letters. In the above example the apostrophe

would
therefore represent the missing letters 'ision'. As you are

clearly a
linguistic expert, I would be interested to know whether there is

much
support for this argument in academic circles. Indeed, a short

thesis
on the role and function of the apostrophe in the contemporary

English
language would no doubt inform us all.


Yeah, go for it Johnny Boy! Let's hear the real intellectual full

dog's
******** from you! You must be bustin' out all over wiv your

erudition!

Bill




You done it now Bill - at least we all know who to blame!


--
Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2017 Digital TV Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.