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Old October 12th 17, 10:29 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Graham.[_12_]
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Default Timecode on programme-as-broadcast archive material

On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 21:13:18 +0100, "NY" coalesced
the vapors of human experience into a viable and meaningful
comprehension...

Brian, what I was meaning is that the timecode - or at least, the burnt-in
timecode that is displayed on-screen in examples such as the in-house
version of an episode of Blue Peter that I mentioned - starts at 10:00:00.00
(ie 10 hours, zero minutes etc), I was expecting it to start at zero hours,
but now people have talked about needing a time code for the run-up
stabilisation time before the start of the programme, I can see why a
pre-zero time of 23:59:30 would be a bad thing.

And I can see why they chose 10 rather 01 as the starting hour, because it
allows you to mentally or literally mask off the leading digit and get a
time which at any instant is the true elapsed time since the start.


By the way, were there ever times when a programme spanned more than one
tape? Did they have a means of the first VTR (when it reached a designated
TC) triggering the run-up of a second VTR and then seamlessly switching
transmission from one to the other at the correct frame?



I don't know how often they *did* do it, but they certainly had the
technology *to* do it as that is how editing was done.

I'll tell you about something that was routinely done at Granada in
the mid '80s, because I saw it for myself. When Coronation St was to
be played out from VTR they cued up a pair of C format machines, the
second one carrying a copy that was called "the guard", so should
anything go wrong, like a head clog, the operator could very quickly
switch to the other machine.

--

Graham.
%Profound_observation%