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Old October 12th 17, 08:13 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
NY
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Default Timecode on programme-as-broadcast archive material

Brian, what I was meaning is that the timecode - or at least, the burnt-in
timecode that is displayed on-screen in examples such as the in-house
version of an episode of Blue Peter that I mentioned - starts at 10:00:00.00
(ie 10 hours, zero minutes etc), I was expecting it to start at zero hours,
but now people have talked about needing a time code for the run-up
stabilisation time before the start of the programme, I can see why a
pre-zero time of 23:59:30 would be a bad thing.

And I can see why they chose 10 rather 01 as the starting hour, because it
allows you to mentally or literally mask off the leading digit and get a
time which at any instant is the true elapsed time since the start.


By the way, were there ever times when a programme spanned more than one
tape? Did they have a means of the first VTR (when it reached a designated
TC) triggering the run-up of a second VTR and then seamlessly switching
transmission from one to the other at the correct frame?




"Brian Gaff" wrote in message
news
I'm not sure what you mean, but on old video tape there was always time
allowed for everything to stabilise, I seem to recall.
Brian

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"NY" wrote in message
o.uk...
This is probably a weird, obsessive question...

I've noticed that if you see a programme from a tape archive (eg BBC's
Windmill Road) with burnt-in timecode, the TC often begins at 10:00:00
rather than 00:00:00. An example is
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yf3zE0x_dkI Is there a reason why they
chose to begin the TC at a "zero" of 10:00:00?