View Single Post
  #2  
Old July 30th 17, 11:49 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband,uk.tech.digital-tv,alt.satellite.tv.europe
NY
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,135
Default BBC News Blunder

"Java Jive" wrote in message
...
"Powys man gets broadband via satellite over Africa"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-mid-wales-40745533

"[It is the same satellite companies like Sky use to broadcast their
TV signal and] they are positioned above the equator to maximise
coverage."

Oh dear! Actually, they are positioned over the equator because that
is the only place you can obtain a geo-stationary orbit, enabling
fixed dishes to work. Satellites that aren't in geo-stationary orbit
require movable dishes that can track an orbit to communicate with
them ...


Could you not have a satellite in a geostationary orbit above another line
of latitude than the equator, as long as it still rotates in a line parallel
to the equator and rotates around the earth at the same rate as the earth
spins? Or would there be a nett force dragging it towards the nearer of the
two poles - is the equator the only place for geostationary because there is
no nett force towards either pole?