Thread: Radio 2
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Old February 6th 17, 04:48 PM posted to uk.tech.digital-tv
Roderick Stewart[_3_]
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On Mon, 06 Feb 2017 18:32:08 +0100, Martin wrote:

If you had ever done a labouring job requiring little brain power, you would
know that only the music keeps people awake in the middle of the night.


I've spent my working life as a steelworker, merchant seaman, soldier,
and for the last 25 years running a taxi company.
All of these involved shift work and/or being on call 24hrs a day
Falling asleep on the job means your employer will supply a P45 not a
radio to amuse you.

You never spent your days doing a totally moronic job like making a dent in a
tin lid with a press several times day.


A long time ago as a student I once did a labouring job at a steel
rolling mill, where we had to use 3ft long tongs to manhandle RSJs
still glowing cherry red from the rollers. We had to wear 2 inch thick
wooden clogs so we could walk about on these things. We didn't require
any threats from our employers to take extreme care not to fall asleep
doing that. I don't recall the provision of any music, but if there
was any we wouldn't have heard it anyway above the din.


I worked in a steel works too. You had one of the worst jobs.

When I was student I worked in a tin box factory, shoveled sand in a waterworks
and sorted mail and parcels at Xmas. Music provided in the GPO made the sorting
shifts go faster. Music While You Work was provided because it was thought to
help productivity.
The music in the tin box factory was only useful to check at the end of a shift
when the machinery stopped that your hearing wasn't totally destroyed. The
regulars claimed they could hear the music, whilst working, but most of them
were near certifiable; with hindsight I think caused by lead poisoning from
unventilated open solder baths.


I've often thought that the main purpose of a student job such as
described above was to give you a really strong incentive to be a good
student in the hope of acquiring enough qualifications to ensure that
the job will only be a student job and not what you end up doing for
the rest of your life.

I'm glad I did it, but even more glad I'm not still doing it.

Rod.